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#1 boilerroom

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 09:39 PM


I shop at IHERB exclusively and want to avoid expedited shipping costs, so I'm looking for a stabilized probiotic. Is Jarrow's product any good?

http://www.papanatur...s&pid=JRW-03020

#2 hmaxim

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 02:35 PM

I have used Jarrow. I seem to have had better results with more expensive products like one of the pro-biotic pearls that are out there. They are all the same, but marketed under different brand names. A lot more money, but you can tell the difference. Jarrow is inexpensive, and definetly better than some of the junk out there..but I would go for a pearl product.

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#3 zoolander

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 10:11 PM

I use Theralac. The next best thing IMO would be Nature's Way Primadophilus

#4 doug123

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 10:26 PM

I have used Jarrow.  I seem to have had better results with more expensive products like one of the pro-biotic pearls that are out there.  They are all the same, but marketed under different brand names.  A lot more money, but you can tell the difference.  Jarrow is inexpensive, and definetly better than some of the junk out there..but I would go for a pearl product.


A 2002 Bastyr University study of 20 probiotic supplements found that 16 contained bacteria not listed on the label, 6 contained organisms that can make people sick, and 4 contained no live organisms.

When the FDA announced in 2003 a proposed rule to establish good manufacturing practices for supplements, the FDA cited data that 5 of 18 soy and/or red clover supplements contained only 50-80% of the quantity of isoflavones stated on the label, and 8 of 25 probiotic products contained less than 1% of the live bacteria claimed on the label.

http://www.acsu.buff...etyefficacy.htm

http://www.consumerlab.com/ has tested many different supplements from several different companies, and Jarrow is one of the few that can always match their label claims.

Edited by nootropikamil, 06 June 2006 - 11:06 PM.


#5 narbotic

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 10:33 AM

I can attest to jarro-dophilus' ability to return regularity during my parasite cleanse.
But I may be impartial because of love for their label designs. :)

#6 sentrysnipe

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 12:39 PM

during my parasite cleanse.

Which one did you take for this?

#7 ajnast4r

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 04:06 PM

I use Theralac. The next best thing IMO would be Nature's Way Primadophilus


yup... i use nature's way primadophilus bifidus (blue label). 15$ for 3 months worth...
i like to take a probiotic every day... if i didnt mind taking it once a week, ide be using theralac.

jarrow is OK... they get all their culture from instutit rosel in canada(so do all other reputable companies). they only thing they DONT do is guarentee the potency through expiration, which is important imo. ive used it before, theres nothing wrong with it... but ima primadophilus is superior

adam, ive seen the studies out of bastyr & a few other tests... jarrow was not one that was tested or failed.

#8 kottke

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 12:56 AM

Damn, are you guys saying Natures way is better then theralac?

#9 ajnast4r

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 12:58 AM

Damn, are you guys saying Natures way is better then theralac?


nope, just preference

#10 doug123

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 02:28 AM

I was not commenting on Jarrow's Probiotic products. My point was that Jarrow's products are among the few that can always match their label claims.

#11 zoolander

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 02:55 AM

I not sure if Natures Way is better than Theralac. Natures Way is a solid brand. Alot of medical research uses the Natures way brand. I have read peer reviewed papers that used Natures way Hawthorn berry, Ginkgo et.al

#12 ajnast4r

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 03:06 AM

natures way is a solid brand for sure... but just so you know zoo, their pro line stuff (ginkgold, heart care hawthorn, etc etc) is bought from european pharm companies... they are using pre-proven ingredients.

#13 kottke

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 05:46 AM

Well theralac is great but on my budget natures way seems the way for the...future..way. Jarrow look narrow.

I guess as long as Natures Way gets its products of high quality and sells them for good prices, with their name, its all gravy.
I always thought they were borderline.I guess i was wrong

#14 narbotic

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 09:16 AM

Sentrysnipe - I'm using Renew Life's Paragone for the parasite cleanse, and it's definitely clearing my nasal passages and reducing leg fatigue. (tho I am experiencing some odd mood swings)

I'm curious to know how Theralac compares to GHT's Threelac for yeast/candida control. anyone?

#15 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 02:51 PM

I've experimented with quite a few different probiotics in my effort to control IBS-type symptoms. Custom Probiotics, Theralac, Nature's Way Primadophilus, Jarrow EPS, Kyo-Dophilus, and more. While I think Theralac is still the best option for many people, the optimal product and dose can vary greatly from individual to individual depending on the unique state and composition of their gut flora.

I was very surprised to find the most effective probiotic I've ever used to be a common product, available in any supermarket, and unfortunately, not very healthy: Dannon Activia yogurt. This stuff has single-handedly improved the condition and function of my digestive system to nearly normal.

The good thing about big companies is that they have the money to do real research. The strain of bacteria in there (they call it Bifidus Regularis, but its a specific Bifidus Animalis strain) has been shown to survive in the stomach for over 90 minutes, as well as passage through the entire GI tract. That alone separates it from the majority of probiotics on the market. They also performed three different studies, each demonstrating a dramatic improvement in transit time in various groups (healthy adults, women, and elderly subjects). Sluggish transit produces conditions ripe for the overgrowth of undesirable flora, and I think its an underlying culprit behind many people's digestive issues.

I attached a PDF with more details.

I'm not happy with the added sugar, but its working so well that frankly I do not care at the moment.

Attached Files



#16 ajnast4r

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 05:30 PM

funk, now THAT is interesting...

ive found that my digestion is better when i take my primadophilus(which is enteric coated), with a meal... as opposed to on an empty stomach. makes sense that food would act as a carrier... protecting, feeding, and distributing the bacteria throught the GI tract.

those tests were done eating 1 container, 3x per days... thats 60G of simple sugar [:o] although if i had IBS, i doubt i would really care lol

have you looked into ayurvedic methods of spicing food to provoke digestive enzyme production/release? ive found this to be -extremely- effective

#17 kottke

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 05:42 PM

Yea, Funk, you tottaly came out of left feild with the activia thing. Thats f*cking crazy

#18 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 05:47 PM

I know! Who would have thought? This stuff is no joke.

#19 boilerroom

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 09:02 PM

I love Activia, and I typically eat 8 per week. It's probobly the best tasting yogurt I've ever had as well. Thanks for posting that Funk.

#20 ahnenerbe

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 04:10 AM

Why even Theralac has only 5 differents probiotic strains, when there are around 30 proven probiotic strains, plus others like Bacillus Laterosporus ? Isn't there a real multi-probiotic formula on the market ?

Edited by shepard, 04 October 2008 - 03:10 PM.
Removed Product Link


#21 woly

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 02:49 AM

I've experimented with quite a few different probiotics in my effort to control IBS-type symptoms. Custom Probiotics, Theralac, Nature's Way Primadophilus, Jarrow EPS, Kyo-Dophilus, and more. While I think Theralac is still the best option for many people, the optimal product and dose can vary greatly from individual to individual depending on the unique state and composition of their gut flora.

I was very surprised to find the most effective probiotic I've ever used to be a common product, available in any supermarket, and unfortunately, not very healthy: Dannon Activia yogurt. This stuff has single-handedly improved the condition and function of my digestive system to nearly normal.

The good thing about big companies is that they have the money to do real research. The strain of bacteria in there (they call it Bifidus Regularis, but its a specific Bifidus Animalis strain) has been shown to survive in the stomach for over 90 minutes, as well as passage through the entire GI tract. That alone separates it from the majority of probiotics on the market. They also performed three different studies, each demonstrating a dramatic improvement in transit time in various groups (healthy adults, women, and elderly subjects). Sluggish transit produces conditions ripe for the overgrowth of undesirable flora, and I think its an underlying culprit behind many people's digestive issues.

I attached a PDF with more details.

I'm not happy with the added sugar, but its working so well that frankly I do not care at the moment.


I have had a similair expereince to funk. I have found amazing results from a probiotic that my sister bought from a supermarket. It only contains 2 strains (lacto acidophilus and bifid lactis) but ive found it to be far more effective than jarrow dophilus that contains a much wider variety of strains. I now take 1 capsule of jarro dophilus and 1 capsule of the supermarket brand and ive never felt better!

#22 amanda

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 03:34 AM

Natures Way is great, they have the coating that survives the acidic stomach to get to the gut, and the capsules contain food for the bacteria inside. You need to keep probiotics refrigerated though to keep the potency.

If you want to kill the bad bacteria and other pathogens in your stomach to give your probiotics more room for growth, try taking colloidal silver under the tounge 2x a day for a week first. Soverign Silver is the best I have used!

#23 balance

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 10:56 AM

Funk,

I'm wondering what you as probiotic expert think of the following new jarrow product:

http://www.jarrow.co..._Jarro_Dophilus

#24 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 03:17 PM

Depending on what philosophical school of probiotic supplementation you belong to, that looks to be a good product. Its probably comparable to and a better value than theralac.

I personally am not into the dozen strains thing, or lactobacillus-heavy formulas. Bifidobacteria are the primary probiotic bacteria in the gut in terms of quantity*, and a shift toward predominately lactobacilli is a hallmark of the aging process, occuring only in the elderly. I prefer to load up on a handful of select, thoroughly-researched strains. My regimen includes 10 billion CFU L. plantarum 299v, 10 billion CFU B. lactis/animalis, 10 billion CFU Lactobacillus GG, 10 billion CFU B. infantis 35264. None of these strains need any protection from stomach acid and the studies exist to prove they survive transit and colonize the gut.

*lactobacilli are the major probiotic bacteria in the small intestine even in young healthy adults but their absolute numbers are tiny compared to the bifidobacteria in the colon which are greater by orders of magnitude.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 25 February 2009 - 03:31 PM.


#25 balance

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 04:38 PM

Hey Funk,

Thanks for the reply. The strains you mention, are they all found in 1 product? Regardless, can you list the product(s) that include those strains?

What is your opinion of this probiotic: Garden of Life Primal defense ULTRA

#26 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 04:46 PM

That looks pretty good, and includes saccharomyces boulardii which, although not a normal inhabitant of the human gut, has alot of positive research. It is particularly effective for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and most other infectious causes of diarrhea.

The products I use include Culturelle, Align, and Goodbelly. This costs about $75 monthly so I would not necessarily recommend it for others with good digestive and overall health unless you have money to burn.

#27 stephen_b

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 05:40 PM

Funk, what do you think about prebiotics? The goodbelly product you mention contains oligosaccharides.

In "Introducing inulin-type fructans" (PMID 15877886):

Inulin is a generic term to cover all beta(2-->1) linear fructans. Chicory inulin is a linear beta(2-->1) fructan (degree of polymerisation (DP) 2 to 60; DPav=12), its partial enzymatic hydrolysis product is oligofructose (DP 2 to 8; DPav=4), and by applying specific separation technologies a long-chain inulin known as inulin HP (DP 10 to 60; DPav=25) can be produced. Finally, a specific product known as oligofructose-enriched inulin is obtained by combining chicory long-chain inulin and oligofructose. Because of the beta-configuration of the anomeric C2 in their fructose monomers, inulin-type fructans resist hydrolysis by intestinal digestive enzymes, they classify as 'non-digestible' carbohydrates, and they are dietary fibres. By increasing faecal biomass and water content of the stools, they improve bowel habits, but they have characteristic features different from other fibres. They affect gastrointestinal functions not because of their physico-chemical properties but rather because of their biochemical and physiological attributes. In the colon, they are rapidly fermented to produce SCFA that are good candidates to explain some of the systemic effects of inulin-type fructans. Fermentation of inulin-type fructans in the large bowel is a selective process; bifidobacteria (and possibly a few other genera) are preferentially stimulated to grow, thus causing significant changes in the composition of the gut microflora by increasing the number of potentially health-promoting bacteria and reducing the number of potentially harmful species. Both oligofructose and inulin are prebiotic. They also induce changes in colonic epithelium stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the concentration of polyamines, changing the profile of mucins, and modulating endocrine as well as immune functions. From a nutrition labelling perspective, inulin-type fructans are not only prebiotic dietary fibres; they are also low-calorie carbohydrates [6.3 kJ/g (1.5 kcal/g)]. Supported by the results of a large number of animal studies and human nutrition intervention trials, the claim 'inulin-type fructans enhance calcium and magnesium absorption' is scientifically substantiated, but different inulin-type fructans have probably a different efficacy (in terms of effective daily dose), the most active product being the oligofructose-enriched inulin. A series of animal studies demonstrate that inulin-type fructans affect the metabolism of lipids primarily by decreasing triglyceridaemia because of a reduction in the number of plasma VLDL particles. The human data largely confirm the animal experiments. They demonstrate mainly a reduction in triglyceridaemia and only a relatively slight decrease in cholesterolaemia mostly in (slightly) hypertriglyceridaemic conditions. Inulin appears thus eligible for an enhanced function claim related to normalization of blood triacylglycerols. A large number of animal data convincingly show that inulin-type fructans reduce the risk of colon carcinogenesis and nutrition intervention trials are now performed to test that hypothesis in human subjects known to be at risk for polyps and cancer development in the large bowel.

For me, inulin is a top 10 supplement. The Jarrow product is oligofructose-enriched inulin.

StephenB

#28 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 05:51 PM

I am pretty certain they are a good idea to maintain and enhance probiotic populations in healthy people. I'm not as certain they are good idea in combination with antibiotics, because I remain skeptical to the idea that they strictly, without exception, support the growth of only beneficial bacteria.

#29 StrangeAeons

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 06:16 PM

Ah, glad to see we've got a thread here. My regularity is usually alright, although I intermittently have various issues with gas and sour stomach. I've been on Metagenics Ultra Flora Plus DF for a few months, and upped it to twice a day two weeks ago. I haven't really noticed much in the way of improvement, and recently had some bad cramping and diarrhea after I did some cardio a few days ago. I'm not entirely sure what's going on in my gut, but the doc believes I have malabsorption. I also have a history of peptic ulcer some 9 years ago, and that was presumed to have disappeared. I recently tested negative for H. pylori.
Any ideas on what pre/probiotic I should augment the Metegenics with?

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#30 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 06:37 PM

Response to various probiotics is very individualistic but I can recommend what has worked for me. Individually or in combination, I would try adding (one at a time though to gauge effectiveness) culturelle, align, or goodbelly. If I had to choose one as a "most likely to be helpful" candidate, probably goodbelly. Also I would recommend increasing your dose of glutamine higher than the typically recommended 2-4g range because IMO that isn't enough to make a dent.




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