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PQQ(Pyrroloquinoline Quinone) for sale


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#1 leon

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 09:25 AM


PQQ have been considered as a first new vitamin in 55 years.(Kasahara, T. & Kato, T. Nature 422, 832 2003).Though some scientists doubt this conclusion. they think PQQ is just a nutritional material. Some nutraceutical companies have added PQQ in their product for sale. For example: AMADORI A.G.E. SHIELD and Ortho-Core. Thanks you for your consideration!

Removed some naugthy commercial references. This is an old post that resulted in a positive contribution otherwise.

Edited by brainbox, 17 July 2007 - 09:39 PM.


#2 xanadu

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 10:00 PM

How about some info including links to studies? We frown on spamming here particularly by brand new names. Besides that, no one will buy it without a lot more info.

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#3 leon

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 05:27 AM

How about some info including links to studies? We frown on spamming here particularly by brand new names. Besides that, no one will buy it without a lot more info.

:) Thanks for reminding me.These are some info
a brief view about PQQ:
http://www.aor.ca/ma...Quinone_PQQ.pdf

PQQ as a neuroprotectant:
http://www.blackwell...journalCode=ejn

PQQ and Parkinson's disease :
http://lib.bioinfo.pl/pmid:16962995

PQQ and growth:
http://jn.nutrition....tract/136/2/390
http://www.ebmonline...tract/228/2/160

The nutrition product including PQQ:
http://www.uniquenut...id=204&catid=33

#4 leon

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 05:28 AM

and some more papers about Pqq
[1] RIKEN Brain Science Institute. PQQ is the First New Vitamin in 55 Years. Available at http://www.brain.rik...qq/index-e.html

[2] Kasahara T, Kato T. Nutritional biochemistry: A new redox-cofactor vitamin for mammals. Nature. 2003 Apr 24;422(6934):832.

[3] Gelernt MD, Herbert V. Mutagenicity of diisopropylamine dichloroacetate, the "active constituent" of vitamin B15 (pangamic acid). Nutr Cancer. 1982;3(3):129-33.

[4] Colman N, Herbert V, Gardner A, Gelernt M. Mutagenicity of dimethylglycine when mixed with nitrite: possible significance in human use of pangamates. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1980 May;164(1):9-12.

[5] American Cancer Society. Unproven methods of cancer management. Laetrile. CA Cancer J Clin. 1991 May-Jun;41(3):187-92.

[6] Killgore J, Smidt C, Duich L, et al. Nutritional importance of pyrroloquinoline quinone. Science. 1989 Aug 25;245(4920):850-2.

[7] Steinberg FM, Gershwin ME, Rucker RB. Dietary pyrroloquinoline quinone: growth and immune response in BALB/c mice. J Nutr. 1994 May;124(5):744-53.

[8] Steinberg F, Stites TE, Anderson P, et al. Pyrroloquinoline quinone improves growth and reproductive performance in mice fed chemically defined diets. Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2003 Feb;228(2):160-6.

[9] Stites TE, Mah J, Fluckiger R, et al. Dietary deficiency of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) alters mitochondrial function in young mice. FASEB J. 1996 Mar;10(3):A800(Abs4622).

[10] Stites TE, Mitchell AE, Rucker RB. Physiological importance of quinoenzymes and the O-quinone family of cofactors. J Nutr. 2000 Apr;130(4):719-27.

[11] Smidt CR, Steinberg FM, Rucker RB. Physiologic importance of pyrroloquinoline quinone. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1991 May;197(1):19-26.

[12] Gibbons W. Vitamin or just vital? Cryptic molecule leads scientists in circles - pyrroloquinoline quinone may help vitamin B6 control the body's levels of amines. Science News. 1991 May 25; available online at http://www.findartic..._10839659/print

[13] National Center for Biotechnology Information. NCBI Sequence Viewer v2.0. Entry: Homo sapiens 2-aminoadipic 6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (NRPS998), mRNA. NB 181806. Online at
http://www.ncbi.nlm....de&val=45580729

[14] Hamagishi Y, Murata S, Kamei H, et al. New biological properties of pyrroloquinoline quinone and its related compounds: inhibition of chemiluminescence, lipid peroxidation and rat paw edema. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1990 Dec;255(3):980-5.

[15] Jensen FE, Gardner GJ, Williams AP, et al. The putative essential nutrient pyrroloquinoline quinone is neuroprotective in a rodent model of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury. Neuroscience. 1994 Sep;62(2):399-406.

[16] Sanchez RM, Wang C, Gardner G, et al. Novel role for the NMDA receptor redox modulatory site in the pathophysiology of seizures. J Neurosci. 2000 Mar 15;20(6):2409-17.

[17] Aizenman E, Jensen FE, Gallop PM, et al. Further evidence that pyrroloquinoline quinone interacts with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor redox site in rat cortical neurons in vitro. Neurosci Lett. 1994 Feb 28;168(1-2):189-92.

[18] Aizenman E, Hartnett KA, Zhong C, et al. Interaction of the putative essential nutrient pyrroloquinoline quinone with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor redox modulatory site. J Neurosci. 1992 Jun;12(6):2362-9.

[19] Yamaguchi K, Sasano A, Urakami T, et al. Stimulation of nerve growth factor production by pyrroloquinoline quinone and its derivatives in vitro and in vivo. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 1993 Jul;57(7):1231-3.

[20] Iswantini D, Kano K, Ikeda T. Kinetics and thermodynamics of activation of quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase apoenzyme in vivo and catalytic activity of the activated enzyme in Escherichia coli cells. Biochem J. 2000 Sep 15;350 Pt 3:917-23.

[21] Mitchell AE, Jones AD, Mercer RS, Rucker RB. Characterization of pyrroloquinoline quinone amino acid derivatives by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and detection in human milk. Anal Biochem. 1999 May 1;269(2):317-25.

[22] Mah J, Paz MA, Fluckiger R, Gallop PM. Aging, mitochondria and superoxide: cofactor PQQ in NADH:Co-Q reductase (ND1), a mtDNA-encoded subunit in Complex I. J Gerontol. 1993;

[23] Mah J, Paz MA, Rosen JF. Lead toxicity targets to pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in mitochondrial Complex I and in red cells. Toxicologist. 1995;15:11.

#5 leon

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 05:33 AM

some papers study the function of PQQ for protecting lead poisoning
I forget the website of these papers,I will paste it later

#6 leon

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 06:49 AM

PQQ and myocardial infarct :http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=16785498

#7 curious_sle

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 08:37 PM

plus, it's already in my ortho-core :-). Now if someone had an idea what makes kiwi-fruit tick in respect with dna repair i'd add that to my stack too...

#8 health_nutty

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 08:48 PM

plus, it's already in my ortho-core :-). Now if someone had an idea what makes kiwi-fruit tick in respect with dna repair i'd add that to my stack too...


Do you have any more info on that?

#9 curious_sle

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 07:53 PM

unfortunatedly no.
you might want to see my brief fling with it at sci.life-extension for some links etc or this other post however to the best of my knowledge it is as of yet unknow what causes the effect. Could be folate though.


Kiwifruit consumption reduces DNA fragility: a randomized controlled pilot study in volunteers.

Nutrition Research, Volume 26, Issue 5, Pages 197-201
E. Rush, L. Ferguson, M. Cumin, V. Thakur, N. Karunasinghe, L. Plank


-
Kiwis could protect DNA from damage, says pilot study

By Stephen Daniells

26/07/2006 - Two to three kiwis a day could keep cancer at bay by helping to repair damaged DNA, suggests a pilot study from the home of the fruit.

A pilot study from New Zealand has reported that a daily "prescribed" kiwifruit, in tandem with dietary advice and improved physical activity, led to a significant increase in repair of damaged DNA.

""Prescription" of daily kiwifruit may provide a sustainable population intervention that could reduce some of the risk factors associated with cancer," wrote lead author Elaine Rush from AUT University in Auckland.

Studies from the same university have reported that kiwifruit have laxative effects and could help combat serious cases of constipation, while studies from the University of Oslo have reported that two to three kiwifruit a day significantly reduced blood clotting in human volunteers and could offer protection from strokes and deep vein thrombosis.

The new randomised controlled trial recruited 12 healthy volunteers (six men, six women, average age 43, average BMI 27.5 kg per sq. m). For the first three weeks the subjects were left to live 'normally' with no dietary intervention. After week 3, all subjects were given lifestyle advice, including eating habits and physical activity.

After week 6, the subjects were randomly assigned to either the control (no kiwifruit) group, or to receive a daily dose of kiwifruit equivalent to one kiwi for every 30 kg of body weight.

Blood samples were taken at the start and at subsequent three week intervals to measure blood lipid levels (cholesterol, triglycerides) and to assess DNA damage markers.

No significant changes were observed for weight, blood pressure, or blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels for either of the groups.

This last result is at odds with the Oslo research that reported a drop of 15 per cent for triglyceride levels, although the intervention times are not the same, which limits the ability to directly compare.

Interestingly, when the cells of the subjects were challenged with peroxide (to induce damage) it was found that cells of people supplemented with kiwis "showed an improved ability of the DNA to repair itself after the peroxide challenge."

This protective effect was also found to persist for up to 24 hours.

No mechanism is proposed by the researchers but they do hint towards the antioxidant content of the fruit that could protect against the oxidising challenge of the peroxide, which in turn reduce the presence of damaged DNA and potential subsequent cancer formation.

The fruit are a rich source of polyphenols, vitamins C and E, and folate.

"We have provided the evidence that would endorse the provision of free or easily accessible fruit and vegetables to populations at risk because of poor diet; children, for example, should be beneficial in the long-term prevention of cancer and other "lifestyle" diseases," concluded the researchers.

New Zealand's largest kiwi supply company, Seeka Kiwifruit Industries, reportedly handles more than 27 per cent of NZ's crop, which totals about 23 million trays of Green, Gold and Organic fruit. The company recently announced it was extending its business portfolio into the nutraceutical world by marketing a kiwi supplement.

The company are aiming to market the supplement on the strength of its laxative benefits.

#10 health_nutty

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 10:04 PM

unfortunatedly no.


You are curious! You say you have no info, then proceed to give a good amount of info including links :)

#11 curious_sle

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 05:44 PM

well, i have no info on what makes kiwi tick :-) but i have encountered some on PQQ :-)

#12 neogenic

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 05:42 PM

Has any further info on PQQ been unearthed?

#13 caston

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 06:37 AM

http://en.wikipedia....inoline_quinone

#14 Fredrik

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 06:16 PM

In the wikipedia article there is a link with a FAQ on PQQ:

http://www.brain.rik...q/faq-e.html#03

#15 leon

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Posted 03 November 2007 - 02:35 AM

well, i have no info on what makes kiwi tick :-) but i have encountered some on PQQ :-)

As I know, free radical can induce the DNA damage. And PQQ is a strong free radical scavenger.Maybe is a reason.

Edited by shepard, 09 November 2007 - 10:25 PM.


#16 curious_sle

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 09:51 PM

uh huh, from the future even :-) (found in sciu.life-extension, by courtesy of rs1000)

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2007 Nov 16;363(2):257-62.

Pyrroloquinoline quinone preserves mitochondrial function and prevents
oxidative injury in adult rat cardiac myocytes.

Tao R, Karliner JS, Simonis U, Zheng J, Zhang J, Honbo N, Alano CC.

Cardiology Section, San Francisco VA Medical Center and UCSF, San
Francisco, CA, USA.

We investigated the ability of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) to
confer resistance to acute oxidative stress in freshly isolated adult
male rat cardiomyocytes. Fluorescence microscopy was used to detect
generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane
potential (Deltapsi(m)) depolarization induced by hydrogen peroxide.
H(2)O(2) caused substantial cell death, which was significantly
reduced by preincubation with PQQ. H(2)O(2) also caused an increase in
cellular ROS levels as detected by the fluorescent indicators CM-
H2XRos and dihydroethidium. ROS levels were significantly reduced by a
superoxide dismutase mimetic Mn (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid)
porphyrin chloride (MnTBAP) or by PQQ treatment. Cyclosporine-A, which
inhibits mitochondrial permeability transition, prevented H(2)O(2)-
induced Deltapsi(m) depolarization, as did PQQ and MnTBAP. Our results
provide direct evidence that PQQ reduces oxidative stress,
mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death in isolated adult rat
cardiomyocytes. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms
of PQQ action in the heart.

PMID: 17880922 [PubMed - in process]

#17 leon

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 02:02 AM

in fact,I think the paper cited by curious_sle is inspired by the result of USA Proffessor Robert B Rucker.Rucker's team has pressed a paper in journal FASEB J as below in April.
NUTRIENT-GENE INTERACTIONS II:
Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis
Winyoo Chowanadisai, Kathryn Bauerly, Eskouhie Tchaparian, and Robert B Rucker
FASEB J, Apr 2007; 21: A1104.

2007 (Part II) Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis Winyoo...One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, 95616 PQQ is found in numerous foods. Oxidative metabolism...diets fed to mice and rats are devoid of PQQ. Gene array and QRTPCR studies indicate
BIOCHEMISTRY OF VITAMINS AND MINERALS:
Pyrroloquinoline quinone nutritional status and parameters important to mitochondrial function
Katie Bauerly, Calliandra Harris, Eskouhie Tchaparian, James J. Graham, Peter Havel, Michael Satre, Sheila Eghbali, Winsoo Chowanadisai, Mary Sun, and Robert Rucker
FASEB J, Mar 2007; 21: LB57.
Find more like this

Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) deficiency influences the mitochondrial...metabolism, we investigated the effect of PQQ deficiency on mitochondriogenesis. Herein...rats fed amino-acid based diets with (2 mg PQQ/Kg diet) or devoid of PQQ for 3-5 weeks

#18 CuriousGeorge

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Posted 11 January 2008 - 07:33 PM

So does anyone know where to get PQQ as a stand alone product. The two mentioned above have very little in them. (5mcg-30mcg) What is the recommended daily intake?

#19 lynx

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 04:52 AM

http://www.drpasswat...ibrary/PQQ.html -- has a list of natural sources, he neglects to mention that chick embryos are probably the best source.

#20 piet3r

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 05:51 PM

Did anyone stop and notice that the PQQ is not in ortho core anymore? When I called AOR they told me they can't get a source of PQQ anymore so they can't put it in. They said there was a problem with getting it worldwide. From this source that would seem like bs....

Just figured people should know in case they don't already.

#21 neogenic

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 06:30 PM

Did anyone stop and notice that the PQQ is not in ortho core anymore? When I called AOR they told me they can't get a source of PQQ anymore so they can't put it in. They said there was a problem with getting it worldwide. From this source that would seem like bs....

Just figured people should know in case they don't already.

I noticed this. I've been looking for a supplemental version of this and saw that there was a patented version, VitaPQQ, from a company called MAYPRO. Anyone seen this ingredient in anything?

#22 Jacovis

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 03:00 AM

Yes PQQ looks to now be available now on a few sites. For example: http://www.lifesvigo...-life-labs.html and http://www.supervits...caps-P3720.aspx

Interestingly, PQQ has been demonstrated to oxidize the redox modulatory site of NMDA receptors. From the Wikipedia entry on the NMDA receptor:
"NMDA receptor function is also strongly regulated by chemical reduction and oxidation, via the so-called "redox modulatory site." Through this site, reductants dramatically enhance NMDA channel activity, whereas oxidants either reverse the effects of reductants or depress native responses. It is generally believed that NMDA receptors are modulated by endogenous redox agents such as glutathione, lipoic acid, and the essential nutrient pyrroloquinoline quinone."

Quite a bit of research on it but the below abstract seems to question its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier in the 'whole animal' as opposed to cultured cells...

Nutrition Reviews
Volume 56 Issue 10, Pages 287 - 293
Published Online: 27 Apr 2009

Pyrroloquinoline Quinone: A Novel Vitamin?
Amy Bishop Ph.D.1, Paul M. Gallop Ph.D.2 Manfred L. Karnovsky Ph.D.3
1Department of Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Harvard School of Public Health 2Laboratory of Human Biochemistry, Children's Hospital 3Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

ABSTRACT
Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), otherwise known as methoxatin, is a water-soluble, redox-cycling orthoquinone that was initially isolated from cultures of methylotropic bacteria. It has been found to be a cofactor of some bacterial alcohol dehydrogenases, and is present in many animal tissues. It may be a novel vitamin because it has been shown to be essential for normal growth and development. The redox-cycling ability of PQQ enables it to scavenge or generate superoxide. When fed to animals as a supplement, PQQ prevents oxidative changes that would ordinarily occur. It has been reported to inhibit glutamate decarboxylase activity and protect against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in the brain. It appears that in the whole animal, however, PQQ does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, it increases nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis in mouse astroglial cells, but has to be bound to glycine to penetrate and exert this effect in whole brain. It may therefore be regarded as a "Janus faced" molecule, with its potential for a therapeutic role in the brain still in question.



#23 stephen_b

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Posted 21 November 2010 - 06:05 AM

LEF just launched a PQQ product providing 10 mg/capsule. Like resveratrol, PQQ is said to support mitochondrial biogenesis.

#24 curious_sle

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Posted 21 November 2010 - 01:55 PM

LEF just launched a PQQ product providing 10 mg/capsule. Like resveratrol, PQQ is said to support mitochondrial biogenesis.


Check out http://www.pulsenutr...4&products_id=9 :-)

#25 stephen_b

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Posted 22 November 2010 - 04:03 AM

Thanks. I'm wondering if people think this is worth taking. Many of us are already taking supplements like ALCAR and ubiquinol for mitochondrial health.

#26 smithx

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 05:30 AM

New mitochondria sounds great, but I'm concerned about their quality. If there has already been DNA damage, might the new ones be no better or possibly worse than the existing ones?

More efficient mitochondria is a big reason why younger people have more energy. Older mitochondria create more reactive compounds which can further damage cellular mechanisms.

So: more new efficient ones would be a plus, but more old poorly functioning ones could be worse than keeping the ones you have already.

Anyone have any thoughts or data?

#27 Mortuorum

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Posted 04 December 2010 - 03:19 AM

I just located this research paper which seems to concur, in an in vivo animal model, PQQ’s ability to support and enhance cognitive function though its antioxidant and mitochondrial protective, possibly even rejuvenating metabolism as is being asserted through ad hype from LEF and some other companies recently offering it in supplemental form. What interested me in relation to products currently available/being offered, such as by LEF, was the dosage given the test animals in order to determine and actuate these results and how these dosage sizes relate to what is contained within and suggested to be used by manufacturers such as LEF as the products seem within their potency to be grossly inadequate, offering a token amount of PQQ for a premium price.

Take a look: The rats and mice used in this study were fed 20mg of PQQ per kg. of body weight. This undoubtedly translates into much less, but, on the other hand, given that human beings weigh considerably more than a single kilogram, does that not indicate that the dose of your supplement, at 10mg to 20mg suggested per day. is grossly inadequate an amount to achieve any real benefit? Can you show me any in vivo animal/human studies supporting that all the benefits the product purports to impart, can be achieved at this low dose? This concerns me as I certainly wouldn't want to spend my money on this supplement if the dosage is far too low to impart any real benefit. 20mg per kilogram of body weight translated to an average weight human model would be more in the range of 1500mg to 2000mg of supplemental PQQ necessary per day. I think this merits due consideration and research as well as an erudite, substantive response on the part of LEF and any other manufacturer offering this substance for sale such as MGC in Japan, who seem to be the ones who’ve patented it as “BioPQQ”. I think this should be addressed to these entities by as many sources as possible before people are gulled into shelling out a lot of money for something that might well be ineffectual at the dosage available, not to mention affordable.

Here is a link to the study:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2212345/

I'll attach another paper as well which had resultant effects of promise, but in this case, the test animal models were administered the PQQ via intravenous/parenteral injections, which we all know is very disparate from oral dosing. This research also called into question the adequacy with which the PQQ could efficaciously pass the blood brain barrier in order to actualize specific actions/mechanisms of therapeutic value, however.

Attached Files


Edited by Mortuorum, 04 December 2010 - 03:26 AM.

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#28 saxiephon

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Posted 04 December 2010 - 03:32 PM

The following is a very complete review of PQQ:
http://www.thorne.co...xt/14/3/268.pdf
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#29 Mortuorum

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Posted 04 December 2010 - 05:39 PM

The following is a very complete review of PQQ:
http://www.thorne.co...xt/14/3/268.pdf


Yes, that paper was funded in part by Mitsubishi Gas, the entity patenting PQQ in Japan. The question of efficacious dosage in order to impart and actuate specific effects in human models is still not clarified by this paper, either and, what does seem apparent is that benefit to be achieved, if at all through supplementation, would be required at a MUCH larger dose than the existent available supplements on the market supply. Unless you have an exorbitant disposable income to spend upon it, that is..........
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#30 K Complex

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Posted 04 December 2010 - 06:02 PM

It would be nice to have some anecdotal reports at least.

Edited by rwac, 04 December 2010 - 06:03 PM.





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