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Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Bruce Klein

  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 09 September 2002 - 03:42 AM


Found this article in Science. The following is the supplementary material to the Main Article.

I wanted to post the graph as a nice visual.. pretty cool ehh?
To clarify, the data is compiled mainly from a few European Countries, although the trend is indicative of what's happening in most every country of the world today...


[>] Link


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#2 Bruce Klein Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 09 September 2002 - 05:11 AM

Life expectancy is consistently underestimated, say researchers

http://bmj.com/cgi/c...324/7347/1173/a

But they say that increases of just a few years in life expectancy can have an enormous impact on health and social services. Increasing prosperity, better nutrition, improvements in public health, and technological advances have fuelled increases in economic output and population size, including a large increase in the number of elderly people. Global life expectancy has more than doubled over the past two centuries.

But forecasts have been based on US projections made in 1928, which predicted that biological and practical impediments would curtail maximum longevity to 65 for both sexes. Non-Maori New Zealand women were already living longer than this in 1921, and by 1996 Japanese women had outlived the revised projection of 85 made in 1990 and 2001.

Women in Japan, followed closely by their French and Swiss peers, now have a 1 in 20 chance of reaching 100



#3 Mind Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:Wausau, WI
  • yes

Posted 09 September 2002 - 04:59 PM

These graphs tend to remind me of all the predictions made, about how long people can live. 100 years ago some scientists were "certain" that life expectancy could not surpass 65 years. Now it is said that the maximum lifespan is about 120 years, "no getting around it". Judging by the graphs above I wouldn't want to place any bets on how far our ingenuity can take us. Much farther than most people think.

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#4 Bruce Klein Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 09 September 2002 - 11:55 PM

Average Life Expectancy:
United States Total Pop

1999 = 76.7
1950 = 68.2
1900 = 47.3 Years

[>] Link

#5 Bruce Klein Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 12 September 2002 - 07:44 PM

Yahoo News Of Interest [>] Link

"In 2000, Americans enjoyed the longest life expectancy in U.S. history -- almost 77 years, based on preliminary figures," said the report

#6 Guest_Ted_* Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

Posted 19 September 2002 - 09:45 PM

How much of this is based on infant mortality going down as opposed to people living longer? I tend to think that people are not really living longer, meaning people are not dying of old age a lot later. For example Socrates was executed at the age of 70. He seemed to have all his mental faculties at that age, I would assume that 70 was not that unusual of an age back then and that people lived much older.

#7 Bruce Klein Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 September 2002 - 06:37 AM

Ted,
Thanks for your observation, your point about infant mortality is valid... I remember seeing somewhere that decreasing infant deaths is a large part of the increase in average life expectancy.

However, I do not think this accounts fully for the drastic and considerable increase in average lifespan.


Info On Infant Death:

The infant mortality rate in the United States has dramatically decreased from a level of 47 per 1000 live births in 1940 to 7.7 deaths per 1000 live births in 1996. This reduction is due to advances in prenatal care, care during delivery, and management of complications existing after delivery. Also, many infectious diseases that used to claim the lives of many infants have been eradicated or controlled. The education of women of childbearing age concerning pregnancy and the widening availability of health care in this country have also played a role in this statistic.

http://www.uky.edu/C...PHI/350/cod.htm



Of Interest:
BobDrake has posted this article in the following topic link.

----From the moment of birth, we begin the battle against the inevitable. Statistics say that a newborn child can expect to live an average of 76 years. But averages may not be what they use to be.
In 1796, life expectancy was 24 years. A hundred years later it doubled to 48. Right now, it's 76. "Over half the baby boomers here in America are going to see their hundredth birthday and beyond in excellent health," says Dr. Ronald Klatz of the American Academy of Anti-Aging. "We're looking at life spans for the baby boomers and the generation after the baby boomers of 120 to 150 years of age."

#8 Lazarus Long Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:Northern, Western Hemisphere of Earth, Usually of late, New York

Posted 28 September 2002 - 02:29 PM

The leading cause of death for all history over all the Earth has been, and still is, birth.

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#9 Bruce Klein Re: Graph Of Increasing Average Lifespan :: Science

  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 19 December 2002 - 10:12 AM

Ted Asked:

How much of this is based on infant mortality going down as opposed to people living longer?


The following quote speeks to the heart of the issue.


Until recently it was believed that people in the European Middle Ages, if they survived the hazards of infancy and childhood, lived 'as long as people do today'. Only palaeodemographic studies of large samples of skeletons representing the general population can contribute to the thorough rejection of such false assumptions (Gejvall 1960, Boldsen and Vellev 1981, Boldsen 1984 and 1988, and Boldsen, Kieffer-Olsen and Pentz 1985).

The Evolution of Human Longevity
by Jesper L. Boldsen & Richard R. Paine




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