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Resveratrol successfully fights cancer in two dogs


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#31 free

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 09:27 AM

Thanks. I am sure resveratrol will help your animals. A friend of mine whose ChowChow was limping for
almost two years started him on Resveratrol and he limps no more. The response was immediate. She saw an improvement the first day
and by the end of the week, the difference was dramatic. It would probably help your horse's glaucoma too according to the study below.


Antioxidant experiment

The final phase of the experiment evaluated the benefits of antioxidant treatment. Having designed a model to show how IOP elevation can induce oxidative stress and cell death, Dr. Liu and his colleagues wanted to see if they could reverse that process.The RGC-5 cell cultures were pretreated with the antioxidants resveratrol and quercetin (20 µm or 40 µm in dimethyl sulfoxide) for 30 minutes before undergoing 2 hours of elevated pressure (60 mm Hg). Results showed that pretreatment with resveratrol reduced the level of HNE adducts in the cell cultures by 70%, whereas quercetin pretreatment resulted in a 30% reduction in oxidative stress.Resveratrol is a compound found largely in the skin of red grapes and has been studied as a possible explanation for the "French paradox," the relatively low incidence of heart disease among the French, despite their high-fat diet. In addition, resveratrol is a compound that can mimic the effect of caloric restriction, which is the only proven method to elongate the life span of mammals. Quercetin is a flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.Although elevated pressure is a major risk factor for glaucoma, so, too, is aging. Since resveratrol appears to have some anti-aging properties in addition to other protective mechanisms, it might be beneficial in multiple ways, including reduction of oxidative stress levels, Dr. Liu said.Following that preliminary screening process, which showed that resveratrol was more effective than quercetin for reducing oxidative stress levels in cell cultures, Dr. Liu and his colleagues are following up by conducting further experiments in a mouse model of glaucoma. The mice are receiving these compounds in their food; scientists will subsequently study them to determine the presence of any protective effects on the RGC cells.Dr. Liu and his colleagues are conducting other studies to determine the potential role of oxidative stress in the chronic pattern of glaucoma pathology by studying different chronic animal models of glaucoma and even some patient samples. They are exploring the possibility of preventive methods or therapies developed from antioxidants or similar compounds for glaucoma patients.Findings from the three experiments appeared in the October issue of Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (2007;48:4580-4589).


Well, I received my resveratrol today. Do you think starting the dog (50lbs) with 500 mg (99%) and gradually increasing is a good plan? The dosage for the horse (1100 lbs), however, is going to be a bit more difficult for me to determine.

Thanks, missminni, for this article and info.

Edited by free, 13 July 2008 - 09:30 AM.


#32 missminni

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 03:49 PM

Well, I received my resveratrol today. Do you think starting the dog (50lbs) with 500 mg (99%) and gradually increasing is a good plan? The dosage for the horse (1100 lbs), however, is going to be a bit more difficult for me to determine.

Thanks, missminni, for this article and info.


Hi Free
I think starting the dog at 500 mg is a good idea.
The horse I would start at 11 grams and see how he does.
That's figuring 1 g for every 100 pounds of body weight.
My dog minni is 94lbs. If she hadn't been diagnosed with cancer, I would have given her 1 gr.
Being that she was and the prognosis was dire, I tried to flood her system with it by giving
her 6 to 7 times that amount....with great success!
I've been giving her 3 g for a month now, after 5 months of taking higher doses, and will see how that progresses.
So far, everything is great.
Please keep us posted on your experience with it.


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#33 free

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 08:54 PM

Hi Free
I think starting the dog at 500 mg is a good idea.
The horse I would start at 11 grams and see how he does.
That's figuring 1 g for every 100 pounds of body weight.
My dog minni is 94lbs. If she hadn't been diagnosed with cancer, I would have given her 1 gr.
Being that she was and the prognosis was dire, I tried to flood her system with it by giving
her 6 to 7 times that amount....with great success!
I've been giving her 3 g for a month now, after 5 months of taking higher doses, and will see how that progresses.
So far, everything is great.
Please keep us posted on your experience with it.



Don't know how to explain this, but I can already feel the results of the single 500mg dose taken last night. Immediately, I did not feel as achy/stiff in my joints. Old sports injuries/overtraining. A noticeable improvement!

The dog this morning got up and walked around a lot more than usual. Amazing! He usually stumbles around, has considerable muscle atrophy in the hind, neurological damage per the vet. (There was one extra BM last night - no surprise, given all the testimony of looser stools.)

I'm thinking of buying some applesauce or mashing up a banana to mix the resvertatrol for the horse. Or I can add it to a bit of hot bran mash. 11 grams a day will add up quickly. I should have purchased a kilo sized bag! ;)

Edited by free, 13 July 2008 - 09:46 PM.


#34 missminni

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Posted 13 July 2008 - 09:07 PM

Don't know how to explain this, but I can already feel the results of the single 500mg dose taken last night. Immediately, I did not feel as achy/stiff in my joints. A noticeable improvement!

I know exactly what you mean.


The dog this morning got up and walked around a lot more than usual. (There was one extra BM last night - no surprise, given all the testimony of looser stools.)

I'm thinking I'll have to buy some applesauce or mash up a banana to mix the resvertatrol for the horse.

It's basically tasteless. If you can mix it with some olive oil first, and then mix in the applesauce or banana it would be better dispersed. It dissolves real well in milk too. You could always dissolve it in milk, and then mash in the banana.

Or I can add it to a bit of hot bran mash. 11 grams a day will add up quickly. I should have purchased a kilo sized bag! ;)

Try not to use much heat with it. It will degrade it. And yes the grams add up quickly. I bought a few kilos when I found out Minni had
Cancer because I was also using it for my other dog, my dad, and myself. At the time the price was higher so the multiple kilo price was a really
great deal. Now the 100g price has dropped to the point that it is the same as if I bought a kilo. Maybe they have cheaper kilo prices now too. I haven't checked.



#35 free

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 06:20 AM

Try not to use much heat with it. It will degrade it. And yes the grams add up quickly. I bought a few kilos when I found out Minni had
Cancer because I was also using it for my other dog, my dad, and myself. At the time the price was higher so the multiple kilo price was a really
great deal. Now the 100g price has dropped to the point that it is the same as if I bought a kilo. Maybe they have cheaper kilo prices now too. I haven't checked.



Good point about the heat. I wound up using molasses to mix the resveratrol into the horse's feed. A slice of turkey cold cut for the dog.
For me, (lactose intolerant), I use a small amount of chocolate soy milk. Then stir with one of those battery operated whiskers.

The good news is my stamina and strength are going through the roof! Then, I'm wondering, what if I stop, will the results go away as quickly? (hmmm, probably some threads on this already, I'll search...)

Edited by free, 16 July 2008 - 06:47 AM.


#36 missminni

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 12:45 PM

Try not to use much heat with it. It will degrade it. And yes the grams add up quickly. I bought a few kilos when I found out Minni had
Cancer because I was also using it for my other dog, my dad, and myself. At the time the price was higher so the multiple kilo price was a really
great deal. Now the 100g price has dropped to the point that it is the same as if I bought a kilo. Maybe they have cheaper kilo prices now too. I haven't checked.



Good point about the heat. I wound up using molasses to mix the resveratrol into the horse's feed. A slice of turkey cold cut for the dog.
For me, (lactose intolerant), I use a small amount of chocolate soy milk. Then stir with one of those battery operated whiskers.

The good news is my stamina and strength are going through the roof! Then, I'm wondering, what if I stop, will the results go away as quickly? (hmmm, probably some threads on this already, I'll search...)

I stopped for 3 months and the improvements that I had previously....mainly the elimination of MOrtons Nueroms on both my feet which was really debilitating...did not come back. I don't know about the energy thing, because my energy is over the top anyway....but I do know that when I take it before I work out, I am much stronger than if I don't. I think some improvements remain, whether you stop or not, and others, like energy level might require continuing it. Keep me posted on the horse and dog....and you too!

#37 steelheader

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 03:10 PM

I've posted about my nine year old American Bulldog Minni's success fighting cancer with Resveratrol in a few different threads on Imminst. I also posted about the success my friend had with Resveratrol shrinking a malignant tumor on her 11 year old Golden Retriever.
I wanted to start a thread about it so as not to be off topic on other threads and to let everyone know about our success story.
Minni's biopsy report and progress to date are posted on Resveratrol for Dogs and the pinned forum Resveratrol Flunks Vs. Real-World Cancer.

Her biopsy was taken on Jan 8th 2008. She was given 6 months at the most to live.
We are 5 months into it and she is showing no signs of cancer and is healthier than ever as I have happily reported on the other threads.

I also wanted to point out that her surgical scar, which was over 8" long and very ugly, keloid-like and bulging at the time of her surgery,
which was on Jan 8th, can hardly be found. The vet at Bobst was truly amazed at how incredibly well she healed.
That examination was on May 1. At that time, the vet also said that if the cancer was advancing, we would see some signs of
deterioration. There were none. In fact, on the contrary she looked better than ever.

I just took a look at the scar and I honestly couldn't find it. I had to really look close to see a slight hair of a line where the incision was
and if I didn't know there once was an incision there, I would never have found it. I can hardly believe it. Her scar was so gross and bulging, even the vet who performed the surgery apologized saying he had to remove so much more than he planned that he couldn't help the horrible scar. Her 4th and 5th mammary glands and adjacent lymph gland were removed.
Might the Resveratrol be responsible for this amazing healing or do dogs just heal like that?

I wish I'd taken before pictures. It's quite amazing.


Missminni, thanks for your reports. As a result of your success I started my old retriever, Tasha, on resveratrol about a month ago working up to one gram/day. She is about 12 1/2 years old and weighs 50 pounds. She was a hard charging field dog in her youth and has arthritis and calcium deposits in both shoulders. She has been limping for several years and had become old in appearance and demeanor. Tasha's response to resveratrol has exceeded my expectations. She has become active again, demanded to have bumpers (dummies) thrown for her several times per day. She can't run because of the calcium deposits in her shoulders but she walks briskly to retrieve with joy and enthusiasm. The limp is gone. Her coat has become shiny and beautiful, like it was when she was young. Her quality of life has been greatly improved.

#38 missminni

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 03:59 PM

I've posted about my nine year old American Bulldog Minni's success fighting cancer with Resveratrol in a few different threads on Imminst. I also posted about the success my friend had with Resveratrol shrinking a malignant tumor on her 11 year old Golden Retriever.
I wanted to start a thread about it so as not to be off topic on other threads and to let everyone know about our success story.
Minni's biopsy report and progress to date are posted on Resveratrol for Dogs and the pinned forum Resveratrol Flunks Vs. Real-World Cancer.

Her biopsy was taken on Jan 8th 2008. She was given 6 months at the most to live.
We are 5 months into it and she is showing no signs of cancer and is healthier than ever as I have happily reported on the other threads.

I also wanted to point out that her surgical scar, which was over 8" long and very ugly, keloid-like and bulging at the time of her surgery,
which was on Jan 8th, can hardly be found. The vet at Bobst was truly amazed at how incredibly well she healed.
That examination was on May 1. At that time, the vet also said that if the cancer was advancing, we would see some signs of
deterioration. There were none. In fact, on the contrary she looked better than ever.

I just took a look at the scar and I honestly couldn't find it. I had to really look close to see a slight hair of a line where the incision was
and if I didn't know there once was an incision there, I would never have found it. I can hardly believe it. Her scar was so gross and bulging, even the vet who performed the surgery apologized saying he had to remove so much more than he planned that he couldn't help the horrible scar. Her 4th and 5th mammary glands and adjacent lymph gland were removed.
Might the Resveratrol be responsible for this amazing healing or do dogs just heal like that?

I wish I'd taken before pictures. It's quite amazing.


Missminni, thanks for your reports. As a result of your success I started my old retriever, Tasha, on resveratrol about a month ago working up to one gram/day. She is about 12 1/2 years old and weighs 50 pounds. She was a hard charging field dog in her youth and has arthritis and calcium deposits in both shoulders. She has been limping for several years and had become old in appearance and demeanor. Tasha's response to resveratrol has exceeded my expectations. She has become active again, demanded to have bumpers (dummies) thrown for her several times per day. She can't run because of the calcium deposits in her shoulders but she walks briskly to retrieve with joy and enthusiasm. The limp is gone. Her coat has become shiny and beautiful, like it was when she was young. Her quality of life has been greatly improved.

Thanks so much for this post. The only thing better than my own dogs triumph over cancer is to hear how
others benefit from her experience. I actually teared up when I read this. You made my day.
I think there might be something that breaks
up calcium deposits. I'll do little research later and let you know. I have to run now.


#39 missminni

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 06:50 PM

I found this very promising treatment for Calcium deposits

http://www.medscape....warticle/566794
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Shoulder Tendonitis Quickly, Permanently Repaired With
2-Needle Procedure CME

News Author: Martha Kerr
CME Author: Laurie Barclay, MD
Disclosures
Release Date: December 3, 2007; Valid for credit through December 3, 2008
Credits Available

Physicians - maximum of 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for physicians;
Family Physicians - up to 0.25 AAFP Prescribed credit(s) for physicians


From Medscape Conference Coverage of RSNA 2007

December 3, 2007 (Chicago) — Italian surgeons have developed a method of liquefying the hard, painful calcium deposits of calcific tendonitis of the shoulder, removing them nonsurgically and, apparently, permanently.

The technique was described here at the Radiological Association of North America (RSNA) 93rd Scientific Assembly by Luca M. Sconfienza, MD, from the Department of Radiology at AO Ospedale Santa Corona in Pietra Ligure and the Department of Experimental Medicine at the University of Genova, Italy.

Dr. Sconfienza and colleagues have developed a method using ultrasound guidance to inject saline solution directly into the encapsulated calcium deposit through a 14- to 16-gauge needle, which is inserted into the bursa and directed into the nucleus of the calcium deposit. The saline "washes" the tendon, causing the calcium deposit to break up and liquefy and allowing its complete extraction. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons inject a small dose of steroid in the subacromion-subdeltoid bursa.

The entire procedure takes approximately 15 minutes.

Dr. Sconfienza says the procedure is showing a durable response, with no recurrence of tendonitis at 1-year follow-up.

Calcific shoulder tendonitis typically occurs in relatively young adults. Dr. Sconfienza's team has performed the procedure on 2788 patients, ranging in age from 29 to 73 years, with peak occurrence between 30 and 40 years of age. There is a prevalence ratio of 3:2 for women to men.

Dr. Sconfienza told meeting attendees that his team was able to completely extract the calcium deposit from 70.1% of shoulders, with more than 50% successful extraction from another 23.5%, for a good-to-excellent success rate of 93.6%.

There was a success rate of less than 50% in 4.1% and no improvement in only 2.1% of patients, "which may reflect multiple calcifications." Multiple calcifications are less amenable to this treatment approach, Dr. Sconfienza said.

The total cost of this procedure is approximately $100, compared with a cost of more than $500 for conventional shock-wave therapy, which has the added disadvantage of being extremely painful, Dr. Sconfienza noted.

"This is the first time that this 2-needle procedure has been used," he commented. "There was a fear that the larger needle that we used would cause tears, and that the pressure of the saline injection would cause the bursa to rupture. This did not happen. Precise guidance with ultrasound reduces this risk."

Dr. Sconfienza told Medscape Radiology, "We have a smaller experience with the technique in other joints, such as the knee, but it has promise."

Calcific tendonitis infringes on the blood and nerve supply in the shoulder and can cause permanent damage to the joint and limb if untreated, the Italian investigator noted.

Philip O. Alderson, MD, chairman of the Department of Radiology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City and vice chairman of the RSNA Public Information Committee, told Medscape Radiology, "The 2-needle procedure is very interesting and probably the key to its success."

Dr. Alderson, who was the moderator of the session at which Dr. Sconfienza presented his technique, continued: "However, I suspect that the calcium in these joints wasn't hard, crystallized calcium but had a more gelatinous matrix that could be liquefied.

"I think the knee would be amenable to this approach," he added. "Especially the knee with early osteoarthritis.... This [procedure] is very intriguing."

Dr. Sconfienza and Dr. Alderson have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Radiological Association of North America 93rd Scientific Assembly: Abstract SST15-09. Presented November 28, 2007.
Pearls for Practice

* Percutaneous treatment of calcific tendonitis of the rotator cuff had a good-to-excellent success rate of 93.6%. It achieved complete extraction of the calcium deposit from 70.1% of shoulders; more than 50% extraction from an additional 23.5%; less than 50% in 4.1%; and no improvement in only 2.1% of patients.
* This treatment is less successful when there are multiple calcifications. The total cost of this procedure, which takes about 15 minutes, is approximately $100. Improvement is maintained with no recurrence of tendonitis at 1-year follow-up.

CME/CE Test



#40 missminni

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 01:55 AM

I am posting Minni's biopsy report so that it is on this thread instead of just having a link to it in the opening post.
As you can see, it was about as bad as it gets.

Antech Diagnostics 1111 Marcus Avenue Lake Success NY 11042 Phone: 800-872-1001

Eastside Animal Hospital Client # 4132

321 E 52nd St Chart #

New York, NY 10022

Tel: 212-751-5176

Fax: 212-980-3494

Accession No. Doctor Owner Pet Name Received

NYBA01538411 M CARSON MINNIE 01/08/2008

Species Breed Sex Pet Age Reported

Canine Bulldog SF 11Y 01/17/2008 03:37 PM

Test Requested Results Reference Range Units

Biopsy

Biopsy

Microscopic Description: Sections of the 4th and 5th mammary gland

are examined on 3 slides. There is a discrete, partially

encapsulated neoplasm composed of epithelial cells that form

papillary fronds within dilated ducts. The cells have abundant

eosinophilic polyhedral cytoplasm with distinct cell margins. The

nuclei are hyperchromatic with marginated, coarsely clumped

chromatin. Most cells have prominent nucleoli. There is a moderate

mitotic index. The neoplasm is infiltrating the surrounding

connective tissue. Tumor emboli can be seen within lymphatic

vessels. The samples include lymph node. There are nests of

neoplastic cells within the subcapsular sinusoids.



Microscopic Findings: Mammary adenocarcinoma, high grade.



Comment: Survival time and disease free interval of patients with

mammary adenocarcinoma is best correlated with tumor size, degree of

local invasion, nodal or distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis

[1,2]. While this neoplasm is discrete, there is local tissue and

lymphatic vascular invasion. The lymphatic vascular invasion is a

portent of metastatic disease. The prognosis is poor.

[1] Misdorp, W, et al. Prognostic factors in canine mammary cancer.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 56:779-86, 1976.

[2] Yamagami, T, et al. Prognosis for canine malignant mammary

tumors based on TNM and histologic classification. J Vet Med Sci.

58:1079-83, 1996.



David A. Gamble, DVM, PhD, DACVP


Report Notes:

R MAMMARY 4 AND 5



#41 missminni

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Posted 25 July 2008 - 02:06 AM

Update on my friends dog Dolly the golden retriever with malignant tumor on groin.
I saw Dolly today. The tumor is gone. It was first biopsied the last week in Dec. 2007. She found
out the biopsy result at the end of jan. They told her it was huge and malignanat and required chemo
or she would die,
She declined the chemo and started Res, 1 tablespoon a day, which I now think was more like 5 gms
than the 3 we first thought it was. The tumor is totally gone. Totally. The dog is 10 1/2 years old - looks amazing...
playful, healthy and tumor free. I just hope it works this well with people.


#42 missminni

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 02:50 PM

Update
It is now one and half years since they told me Minni would die from un-treatable cancer and 11 months since
her deadline of June 2008.
At 10 and half, she is healthy and happy, with no health issues at all.
Dolly, my friends dog who was also diagnosed with terminal cancer a year and half ago. is also alive and well...healthy and happy.
She is 11 and half years old. Her grapefruit size tumor
disappeared within a couple of months of taking resveratrol, and has not re-appeaered.
Anybody with a dog diagnosed with cancer, I suggest you hi-dose with resveratrol.


#43 caston

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 03:12 PM

Thank you missminni. I have a dog called Chelsea. We used to have a second dog called Zac. Unfortunately we had to get Zac put down because he was getting to old and was in a lot of pain. Perhaps if I had of started him on resveratrol a few years ago he'd be quite spritely to this day. I'm considering giving resveratrol to Chelsea as she too is quite old and perhaps I we can get a few more years of faithful service from her.

A friend of my mums has had some serious trouble with cancer. I tried to suggest resveratrol to her at a dinner meal but her attitude "was well I'll just get it from red wine" I tried explaining that there isn't high enough quantities in red wine but she didn't want to continue the discussion. She was trying to laugh off the subject in a sociable way.

Edited by caston, 05 May 2009 - 03:16 PM.


#44 imarobot

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 05:08 PM

Update
It is now one and half years since they told me Minni would die from un-treatable cancer and 11 months since
her deadline of June 2008.
At 10 and half, she is healthy and happy, with no health issues at all.
Dolly, my friends dog who was also diagnosed with terminal cancer a year and half ago. is also alive and well...healthy and happy.
She is 11 and half years old. Her grapefruit size tumor
disappeared within a couple of months of taking resveratrol, and has not re-appeaered.
Anybody with a dog diagnosed with cancer, I suggest you hi-dose with resveratrol.


That's amazing. I'll keep this in mind for my dogs and for the dogs of friends.

What do you think the cost of this treatment is compared to traditional cancer treatment for dogs? We can work out the cost of 1 gram of res per 100 lbs over N months. But what's the cost of chemo and whatever else is given dogs?

Edited by imarobot, 05 May 2009 - 05:10 PM.


#45 missminni

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 05:37 PM

Update
It is now one and half years since they told me Minni would die from un-treatable cancer and 11 months since
her deadline of June 2008.
At 10 and half, she is healthy and happy, with no health issues at all.
Dolly, my friends dog who was also diagnosed with terminal cancer a year and half ago. is also alive and well...healthy and happy.
She is 11 and half years old. Her grapefruit size tumor
disappeared within a couple of months of taking resveratrol, and has not re-appeaered.
Anybody with a dog diagnosed with cancer, I suggest you hi-dose with resveratrol.


That's amazing. I'll keep this in mind for my dogs and for the dogs of friends.

What do you think the cost of this treatment is compared to traditional cancer treatment for dogs? We can work out the cost of 1 gram of res per 100 lbs over N months. But what's the cost of chemo and whatever else is given dogs?

Chemo and other cancer treatments are much more expensive...and will kill your dog.
Considering you can get resveratrol 98% pure for about 85 cents a gram and a 50 lb dog would need about 4 to 5 grams a day to beat cancer....Resveratrol is a bargain! BTW, it cures them in a couple of months although I would keep giving the Res for at least 6 months at a gradually reduced amount.


#46 missminni

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 05:41 PM

Thank you missminni. I have a dog called Chelsea. We used to have a second dog called Zac. Unfortunately we had to get Zac put down because he was getting to old and was in a lot of pain. Perhaps if I had of started him on resveratrol a few years ago he'd be quite spritely to this day. I'm considering giving resveratrol to Chelsea as she too is quite old and perhaps I we can get a few more years of faithful service from her.

A friend of my mums has had some serious trouble with cancer. I tried to suggest resveratrol to her at a dinner meal but her attitude "was well I'll just get it from red wine" I tried explaining that there isn't high enough quantities in red wine but she didn't want to continue the discussion. She was trying to laugh off the subject in a sociable way.

"You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink." Maybe forward her some scholarly articles about it,

As for your dog Chelsea...start giving her res in her food. You will see the improvement right away. I would start with 1 gram a day if she
is between 50 and 100 lbs.


#47 itrekalot

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 11:47 PM

MissMinni: Please tell me where you obtain your resveratrol. You have had such blessings with it. I thank you for this critical information. I have an older (13-15year-old) border collie mix who had a very large tumor removed along with her spleen last week. I've been told this cancer is not treatable with chemo, and it's a wait and see if it has spread scenario. I want to try the resveratrol after hearing your success stories with it. But, I fear the quality of the many options out there. It sounds like your source works! Thank you for your next post.

#48 missminni

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 12:44 PM

MissMinni: Please tell me where you obtain your resveratrol. You have had such blessings with it. I thank you for this critical information. I have an older (13-15year-old) border collie mix who had a very large tumor removed along with her spleen last week. I've been told this cancer is not treatable with chemo, and it's a wait and see if it has spread scenario. I want to try the resveratrol after hearing your success stories with it. But, I fear the quality of the many options out there. It sounds like your source works! Thank you for your next post.

The person I get it from doesn't advertise or promote.
It's excellent quality and reasonably priced.
You can order or ask for information at www.kingherbs.com.

Good idea to get her on resveratrol. I would figure her dose at 162mg
per kilogram (or 74 mg a lb).
Start her on about a fourth of that amount and work up to the full dose
in the course of a week. Good
luck and please keep us posted.


#49 itrekalot

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 03:29 AM

The person I get it from doesn't advertise or promote.
It's excellent quality and reasonably priced.
You can order or ask for information at www.kingherbs.com.

Good idea to get her on resveratrol. I would figure her dose at 162mg
per kilogram (or 74 mg a lb).
Start her on about a fourth of that amount and work up to the full dose
in the course of a week. Good
luck and please keep us posted.


Thank you for the info, msminni. Unfortunately I had to go elsewhere for the resveratrol micro powder. But, have been giving it to my dog, Clair since 5/25. Sadly, her cancer appears too advanced for benefit. I am not giving up, tho. After tumor removal (identified as a liposarcoma) on 5/7, her energy and eating improved for a couple weeks. Then, it became obvious something was wrong. She all but completely stopped eating and appeared to be in pain. I took her to my vet again, on 5/26, he ran blood work, and her lipase and amylase were very high, along with high white cells and a few other numbers. He determined she had an infection in her pancreas (pancreatitis). He gave me baytril to help the infection. On 5/29, blood work showed infection improvement, with other numbers good except lipase and amylase. He basically said he felt the cancer had spread to the pancreas, inferring, of course, that's it. By late 5/31, Clair appeared to be going downhill, particularly as she had not eaten anything and drank very little all weekend (dehydration). Late Sunday evening, I decided to call Oklahoma State University Veterinary Medical Hospital (This, I SHOULD HAVE DONE instead of my vet on 5/5!). I drove the 120 miles to Stillwater, arriving around 3am. Clair was examined and admitted to Intensive Care, put on IV fluids/nutrition, until morning when diagnostics were run. Result: advanced angiosarcoma (highly metastatic), with the liver completely infiltrated. The pancreas is just responding as tho' it is being invaded because it is so close to the liver. The normal liver enzymes my vet saw, essentially, just means the liver is still functioning. I talked the doctor into administering the resveratrol, and she did (tho' she had never heard of it before), by mixing with water and putting in a large syringe, then forcing it orally. She dosed 3,000mg/day. Her condition did not improve much at all, as it well might have had this been pancreatitis. She was released 6/3 with instructions to consider euthanasia if condition worsened by the end of the week. So far, her condition seems stable. Getting the resveratrol down Clair has been a real challenge. She refuses it orally, with her and me both taking a resveratrol bath and much too little going into her. I bo't "00" gel caps from a local pharmacy, fill them, and now administer it rectally. She doesn't like this much either, but at least it's all going in. She has been drinking enough and consuming some jerky and nutritious dog treats... but not eating anything else. She goes for blood work tomorrow, 6/6. I'll know more then. As Paul Harvey once said, "There is one thing worse than false hope; and that is, false hopelessness". We are "on a wing and a prayer". Stay tuned …

Edited by itrekalot, 06 June 2009 - 03:38 AM.


#50 missminni

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 01:15 PM

The person I get it from doesn't advertise or promote.
It's excellent quality and reasonably priced.
You can order or ask for information at www.kingherbs.com.

Good idea to get her on resveratrol. I would figure her dose at 162mg
per kilogram (or 74 mg a lb).
Start her on about a fourth of that amount and work up to the full dose
in the course of a week. Good
luck and please keep us posted.


Thank you for the info, msminni. Unfortunately I had to go elsewhere for the resveratrol micro powder. But, have been giving it to my dog, Clair since 5/25. Sadly, her cancer appears too advanced for benefit. I am not giving up, tho. After tumor removal (identified as a liposarcoma) on 5/7, her energy and eating improved for a couple weeks. Then, it became obvious something was wrong. She all but completely stopped eating and appeared to be in pain. I took her to my vet again, on 5/26, he ran blood work, and her lipase and amylase were very high, along with high white cells and a few other numbers. He determined she had an infection in her pancreas (pancreatitis). He gave me baytril to help the infection. On 5/29, blood work showed infection improvement, with other numbers good except lipase and amylase. He basically said he felt the cancer had spread to the pancreas, inferring, of course, that's it. By late 5/31, Clair appeared to be going downhill, particularly as she had not eaten anything and drank very little all weekend (dehydration). Late Sunday evening, I decided to call Oklahoma State University Veterinary Medical Hospital (This, I SHOULD HAVE DONE instead of my vet on 5/5!). I drove the 120 miles to Stillwater, arriving around 3am. Clair was examined and admitted to Intensive Care, put on IV fluids/nutrition, until morning when diagnostics were run. Result: advanced angiosarcoma (highly metastatic), with the liver completely infiltrated. The pancreas is just responding as tho' it is being invaded because it is so close to the liver. The normal liver enzymes my vet saw, essentially, just means the liver is still functioning. I talked the doctor into administering the resveratrol, and she did (tho' she had never heard of it before), by mixing with water and putting in a large syringe, then forcing it orally. She dosed 3,000mg/day. Her condition did not improve much at all, as it well might have had this been pancreatitis. She was released 6/3 with instructions to consider euthanasia if condition worsened by the end of the week. So far, her condition seems stable. Getting the resveratrol down Clair has been a real challenge. She refuses it orally, with her and me both taking a resveratrol bath and much too little going into her. I bo't "00" gel caps from a local pharmacy, fill them, and now administer it rectally. She doesn't like this much either, but at least it's all going in. She has been drinking enough and consuming some jerky and nutritious dog treats... but not eating anything else. She goes for blood work tomorrow, 6/6. I'll know more then. As Paul Harvey once said, "There is one thing worse than false hope; and that is, false hopelessness". We are "on a wing and a prayer". Stay tuned …

A couple of things. First, I am so sorry about Clair and hope she will be able to pull through. Also,
remember they had no hope for Minni either and basically told me the same thing after her biopsy, suggesting euthanasia.
Boy am I glad I didn't listen.
1. how much are you giving her. The success is totally dose dependent. You should be giving her at least 5 gms (5000mg) a day...if not more. The more you give, the better her chances. If you can do more than 5 gms a day that would be even better.
2. Res does not mix in water. You should put it in oil. Does Clair like sardines? It mixes very well with sardines and the oil they come in. It also mixes well in yogurt and is enhanced by the whey protein. Try one of those foods, or any wet food she likes, as vehicle and give her at least 5 grams. My dogs love it mixed in canned salmon.
BTW, forcing it down her throat in a syringe would be stressful for her. It has no taste and can be easily mixed in her favorite wet food. If there is no way to mix it in food she will eat try wrapping the capsules in butter and holding her mouth closed gently until she swallows it. Try to place it back on her tongue, and then gently hold her mouth closed and upward with one hand and gently massage under her chin towards her throat...she should swallow it. Actually if you give it both orally and rectally it would be even better. I don't know of anyone giving it rectally, but you would have both "ends" covered. I am on that wing and a prayer with you. Even if the blood work looks bad, keep trying. Where's there's life, there's hope. keep us posted.

.

Edited by missminni, 06 June 2009 - 01:20 PM.


#51 ilanso

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 07:39 AM


Getting the resveratrol down Clair has been a real challenge. She refuses it orally, with her and me both taking a resveratrol bath and much too little going into her. I bo't "00" gel caps from a local pharmacy, fill them, and now administer it rectally. She doesn't like this much either, but at least it's all going in.

2. Res does not mix in water. You should put it in oil. Does Clair like sardines? It mixes very well with sardines and the oil they come in. It also mixes well in yogurt and is enhanced by the whey protein. Try one of those foods, or any wet food she likes, as vehicle and give her at least 5 grams. My dogs love it mixed in canned salmon.
BTW, forcing it down her throat in a syringe would be stressful for her. It has no taste and can be easily mixed in her favorite wet food. If there is no way to mix it in food she will eat try wrapping the capsules in butter and holding her mouth closed gently until she swallows it. Try to place it back on her tongue, and then gently hold her mouth closed and upward with one hand and gently massage under her chin towards her throat...she should swallow it. Actually if you give it both orally and rectally it would be even better. I don't know of anyone giving it rectally, but you would have both "ends" covered. I am on that wing and a prayer with you. Even if the blood work looks bad, keep trying. Where's there's life, there's hope. keep us posted.[/size]
.


Or buy some chicken livers (around $1/lb in Spanish bodegas), boil / steam and chop them finely in a blender. Bury the pill in a small dollop and finger-feed. No dog can resist pâté de foie. In guise of thanks, your finger will be thoroughly licked.

#52 missminni

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 11:51 AM


Getting the resveratrol down Clair has been a real challenge. She refuses it orally, with her and me both taking a resveratrol bath and much too little going into her. I bo't "00" gel caps from a local pharmacy, fill them, and now administer it rectally. She doesn't like this much either, but at least it's all going in.

2. Res does not mix in water. You should put it in oil. Does Clair like sardines? It mixes very well with sardines and the oil they come in. It also mixes well in yogurt and is enhanced by the whey protein. Try one of those foods, or any wet food she likes, as vehicle and give her at least 5 grams. My dogs love it mixed in canned salmon.
BTW, forcing it down her throat in a syringe would be stressful for her. It has no taste and can be easily mixed in her favorite wet food. If there is no way to mix it in food she will eat try wrapping the capsules in butter and holding her mouth closed gently until she swallows it. Try to place it back on her tongue, and then gently hold her mouth closed and upward with one hand and gently massage under her chin towards her throat...she should swallow it. Actually if you give it both orally and rectally it would be even better. I don't know of anyone giving it rectally, but you would have both "ends" covered. I am on that wing and a prayer with you. Even if the blood work looks bad, keep trying. Where's there's life, there's hope. keep us posted.[/size]
.


Or buy some chicken livers (around $1/lb in Spanish bodegas), boil / steam and chop them finely in a blender. Bury the pill in a small dollop and finger-feed. No dog can resist pâté de foie. In guise of thanks, your finger will be thoroughly licked.

So true about chicken liver. No dog can resist. But when I tried the pill in the chicken liver with Minni, she managed to spit the pill out. I suggest you just mix the res powder with the chicken liver pate style. Instead of boiling them...just a light saute in a pan or a few minutes under the broiler leaving them rare and then either chop/mash them by hand, or in the blender.

#53 steelheader

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 02:29 PM


Getting the resveratrol down Clair has been a real challenge. She refuses it orally, with her and me both taking a resveratrol bath and much too little going into her. I bo't "00" gel caps from a local pharmacy, fill them, and now administer it rectally. She doesn't like this much either, but at least it's all going in.

2. Res does not mix in water. You should put it in oil. Does Clair like sardines? It mixes very well with sardines and the oil they come in. It also mixes well in yogurt and is enhanced by the whey protein. Try one of those foods, or any wet food she likes, as vehicle and give her at least 5 grams. My dogs love it mixed in canned salmon.
BTW, forcing it down her throat in a syringe would be stressful for her. It has no taste and can be easily mixed in her favorite wet food. If there is no way to mix it in food she will eat try wrapping the capsules in butter and holding her mouth closed gently until she swallows it. Try to place it back on her tongue, and then gently hold her mouth closed and upward with one hand and gently massage under her chin towards her throat...she should swallow it. Actually if you give it both orally and rectally it would be even better. I don't know of anyone giving it rectally, but you would have both "ends" covered. I am on that wing and a prayer with you. Even if the blood work looks bad, keep trying. Where's there's life, there's hope. keep us posted.[/size]
.


Or buy some chicken livers (around $1/lb in Spanish bodegas), boil / steam and chop them finely in a blender. Bury the pill in a small dollop and finger-feed. No dog can resist pâté de foie. In guise of thanks, your finger will be thoroughly licked.

So true about chicken liver. No dog can resist. But when I tried the pill in the chicken liver with Minni, she managed to spit the pill out. I suggest you just mix the res powder with the chicken liver pate style. Instead of boiling them...just a light saute in a pan or a few minutes under the broiler leaving them rare and then either chop/mash them by hand, or in the blender.


I like to have a process for feeding (and dosing at the same time) my 13 year old Lab which is not time consuming. As her appetite has waned I've started buying large fat chickens (5 poundish fryers). Quarter, cover with a generous amount of water and simmer till chicken is tender and the broth is rich. Separate chicken and broth and de-bone chicken, saving fatty skin and all that good doggy stuff. Refrigerate broth and chicken. At feeding and dosing time, mix the resveratrol in chicken broth and pour over mixed de-boned chicken and the regular food. You might want to warm the broth. I don't bother. My old girl eats it cold with plenty of enthusiam.

#54 itrekalot

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 07:28 PM

[/quote]
A couple of things. First, I am so sorry about Clair and hope she will be able to pull through. Also,
remember they had no hope for Minni either and basically told me the same thing after her biopsy, suggesting euthanasia.
Boy am I glad I didn't listen.
1. how much are you giving her. The success is totally dose dependent. You should be giving her at least 5 gms (5000mg) a day...if not more. The more you give, the better her chances. If you can do more than 5 gms a day that would be even better.
2. Res does not mix in water. You should put it in oil. Does Clair like sardines? It mixes very well with sardines and the oil they come in. It also mixes well in yogurt and is enhanced by the whey protein. Try one of those foods, or any wet food she likes, as vehicle and give her at least 5 grams. My dogs love it mixed in canned salmon.
BTW, forcing it down her throat in a syringe would be stressful for her. It has no taste and can be easily mixed in her favorite wet food. If there is no way to mix it in food she will eat try wrapping the capsules in butter and holding her mouth closed gently until she swallows it. Try to place it back on her tongue, and then gently hold her mouth closed and upward with one hand and gently massage under her chin towards her throat...she should swallow it. Actually if you give it both orally and rectally it would be even better. I don't know of anyone giving it rectally, but you would have both "ends" covered. I am on that wing and a prayer with you. Even if the blood work looks bad, keep trying. Where's there's life, there's hope. keep us posted.

.
[/quote]
UPDATE ON CLAIR. First, thank you all for the various, excellent suggestions to help Clair. Clair is still with us, but her condition has appeared very precarious with this horrible advanced metestatic hemangiosarcoma liver cancer. After my last post, her liver enzymes have continued to rise. She went back to OSU vet school last night, prompted by a nose bleed and "rough" lung sounds. But, her exam/xrays showed nothing of metasteses or pneumonia or "DIC"-a lethal blood coagulation situation, which under her circumstances is likely to develop. But, her liver is very enlarged and pushing on stomach/intestines. I believe the res can take credit for the good report on metasteses and DIC. She will be released today. There have been problems with getting the resveratrol into her: Since my last post on 6/6, she continues to eat VERY little, 1/4 cup or less of pork fat with some lean meat a day, refusing all beef meat/fat. She refuses everything else save on occasion a strip of chicken jerkey. She refuses everything, one could possibly hide medication in, she refuses to swallow when liquid medication is put in her mouth (even when mixed with liver pate), and skillfully manages to spit out medication that has been pushed down her throat! Thinking it went down, 5 minutes later you'll find it laying next to her. In my 35+ years of dog ownership, there has been no other canine even remotely close to Clair's medication-avoidance skill level. It is truly amazing! I have tried freshly and partially cooked beef, the chicken liver, freshly steamed both straight and pureed. Some of which she ate the first couple times then refused. I tried beef liver, which she ate a couple times and then refused. I tried the sardines and other fish, which she wouldn't come close to. I tried yogurt, cottage cheese, block cheeses, milk, cream, butter, eggs, pinto beans, peas, carrots....nothing. Needless to say her care has been difficult. And, getting the res down her has been very difficult. But, I have managed get her to swallow 1,000 or more/day since my last post. As she is showing no apparent metasteses at this point, I do believe the res may take credit. I have been communicating with doctors at Johns-Hopkins re an experimental drug that is very promising, 3-bromo-pyruvate. But, more on that in my next post. Please say a prayer and wish us both allotta luck. Thanks, everyone.

Edited by itrekalot, 18 June 2009 - 07:32 PM.


#55 maxwatt

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 11:13 PM

Perhaps milk-thistle extract, silymarin, would help the liver conditions? I believe its effects overlap resveratrol, it also is a P53 deacetlyase. It may provide additional benefit in liver conditions. Very few studies, bt it seems at least non-toxic in dogs.

#56 missminni

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 11:51 AM

UPDATE ON CLAIR. First, thank you all for the various, excellent suggestions to help Clair. Clair is still with us, but her condition has appeared very precarious with this horrible advanced metestatic hemangiosarcoma liver cancer. After my last post, her liver enzymes have continued to rise. She went back to OSU vet school last night, prompted by a nose bleed and "rough" lung sounds. But, her exam/xrays showed nothing of metasteses or pneumonia or "DIC"-a lethal blood coagulation situation, which under her circumstances is likely to develop. But, her liver is very enlarged and pushing on stomach/intestines. I believe the res can take credit for the good report on metasteses and DIC. She will be released today. There have been problems with getting the resveratrol into her: Since my last post on 6/6, she continues to eat VERY little, 1/4 cup or less of pork fat with some lean meat a day, refusing all beef meat/fat. She refuses everything else save on occasion a strip of chicken jerkey. She refuses everything, one could possibly hide medication in, she refuses to swallow when liquid medication is put in her mouth (even when mixed with liver pate), and skillfully manages to spit out medication that has been pushed down her throat! Thinking it went down, 5 minutes later you'll find it laying next to her. In my 35+ years of dog ownership, there has been no other canine even remotely close to Clair's medication-avoidance skill level. It is truly amazing! I have tried freshly and partially cooked beef, the chicken liver, freshly steamed both straight and pureed. Some of which she ate the first couple times then refused. I tried beef liver, which she ate a couple times and then refused. I tried the sardines and other fish, which she wouldn't come close to. I tried yogurt, cottage cheese, block cheeses, milk, cream, butter, eggs, pinto beans, peas, carrots....nothing. Needless to say her care has been difficult. And, getting the res down her has been very difficult. But, I have managed get her to swallow 1,000 or more/day since my last post. As she is showing no apparent metasteses at this point, I do believe the res may take credit. I have been communicating with doctors at Johns-Hopkins re an experimental drug that is very promising, 3-bromo-pyruvate. But, more on that in my next post. Please say a prayer and wish us both allotta luck. Thanks, everyone.

Will say many prayers for Claire. She probably is so uncomfortable with her enlarged liver pressing on her a stomach and that would make her feel full and not want to eat. What a terrible predicament. Are you still doing resveratrol suppositories? The res is probably responsible for keeping DIC at bay too, since it does thin the blood a bit. Minni was the same way with pills...I would think she swallowed them and would find them a few hours later on the floor. Keep us posted.

#57 Athena

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 10:31 PM

I love reading the success stories of giving resv to dogs and was so impressed with miss minnie. I am wondering if anyone has heard of using resv with cats. The cat's digestive system works differently than dogs or humans. They are obligatory carnivores. They do not have all the enzymes to process carbs like grains, fruit or vegetables. I am not sure if it would be beneficial or potentially harmful to a cat. I would love to hear from anyone who has tried resv with their cats. Thanks!! :)

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#58 maxwatt

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 04:56 AM

I love reading the success stories of giving resv to dogs and was so impressed with miss minnie. I am wondering if anyone has heard of using resv with cats. The cat's digestive system works differently than dogs or humans. They are obligatory carnivores. They do not have all the enzymes to process carbs like grains, fruit or vegetables. I am not sure if it would be beneficial or potentially harmful to a cat. I would love to hear from anyone who has tried resv with their cats. Thanks!! :)

While I've not used resveratrol ona cat, Ibelieve that being carnivores they would need less resv than omnivores like primates that have extensive enzymatic systems for dealing with phytochemicals. They will achieve higher serum levelsw with lower doses as they don't glucornicate or sulfonate resveratrol with anywhere near the efficiency of humans.

#59 itrekalot

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 06:25 AM

[/quote]
Will say many prayers for Claire. She probably is so uncomfortable with her enlarged liver pressing on her a stomach and that would make her feel full and not want to eat. What a terrible predicament. Are you still doing resveratrol suppositories? The res is probably responsible for keeping DIC at bay too, since it does thin the blood a bit. Minni was the same way with pills...I would think she swallowed them and would find them a few hours later on the floor. Keep us posted.
[/quote]

Thank you for your posts and prayers for Clair. Altho' I continued with the resveratrol, her deterioration in behavior and liver bloodwork were dramatic. I managed to find an experimental drug and make the needed arrangements for it to be tried with her. I was able to locate a very progressive veterinary oncologist at a Missouri university who agreed to try this having the necessary willingness, skill and equipment. The chemical intermediates were mixed by the reseacher and FedExed to the hospital in Missouri where they were combined (to satisfy FDA regulations), while Clair and I drove to MO. It was infused intraarterially directly to the liver. Clair came thru' the procedure very well on Monday. This promising drug, in the laboratory, has actually eradicated, not simply reduced, liver cancer in 100% of a group of laboratory animals. Unfortunately, by the time she was treated, the hemangiosarcoma had consumed so much of her liver that it was no longer able to support her body's needs. Still, we tried...with hope of a miracle. Sadly, this swift and vicious cancer had its way, and she went to the Rainbow Bridge at 4:30 Wednesday morning, June 24th. The developers had never tried the new drug on a canine, so both the reseacher and Oncology Foundation have praised Clair for having made a meaningful contribution to the future of cancer treatment. Post mortem showed additional masses in the kidney and one in the pancreas. More will be known in a few weeks when the histopath on her treatment comes back. Clair was a trooper until the very end, but obviously depressed and tired of fighting. She is dearly missed, and will be remembered always.

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#60 missminni

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 11:56 AM

I love reading the success stories of giving resv to dogs and was so impressed with miss minnie. I am wondering if anyone has heard of using resv with cats. The cat's digestive system works differently than dogs or humans. They are obligatory carnivores. They do not have all the enzymes to process carbs like grains, fruit or vegetables. I am not sure if it would be beneficial or potentially harmful to a cat. I would love to hear from anyone who has tried resv with their cats. Thanks!! :)

What a beautiful cat!




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