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#1 nameless

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 09:25 PM


Although I eat blueberries, I probably don't eat them often enough. I also tend to suffer from 'blue mouth' disease if I eat them too often (meaning my teeth turn all blue).

I looked over some of the blueberry supplements out there, and am not sure which to choose, if any.

LEF's is a bit expensive, for the anthocyanins per capsule (12.5), assuming their newer product contains the same as their old one did. It's a bit hard to tell now, as they seem to purposely not mention the amount of anthocyanins in their extract. They now include Aurora Blue, but at 50mg I'm not sure it's really enough to do much. They also don't mention how much Pterostilbene is in their product, although they mention it in the product description.

Natural Factors has their BlueRich extract, which appears similar to LEF's in terms of anthocyanin content (12.5), but with less variety of extracts included. They are a lot cheaper though. There seems to be anecdotal reports of it lowering blood sugar + triglycerides (at iHerb anyway), possibly due to Alpha-glucosidase inhibition? This may be a good or bad thing, depending on a person's glucose levels.

FruitFast has a gel extract with 40mg of anthocyanins. But they are the most expensive, not available anywhere besides directly ordering from them, and I'm not sure how good a company they really are. They also claim powdered extracts have no health benefit, which doesn't seem so believable to me (sounds like a marketing ploy).

And then there are also bilberry extracts, usually at 25% anthocyanins. Their benefits should be similar, if not the same, as North American blueberries, so I have been considering them instead. They also have that whole 'vision benefit' thing going for them, but I'm not sure if the studies back that up so well. Jarrow and LEF have reasonably priced bilberry extracts.

So... are any of these worth supplementing with? Anybody out there ever notice vision improvement from using bilberry? Or should I just try to eat more blueberries and save my money?

#2 bgwithadd

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 10:31 PM

There've been some pretty good studies with bilberry and people don't usually notice a supplement's action like with bilberry. I don't really know why you'd even want to supplement blueberries, to be honest. Bilberries are almost certainly more bang for the buck. You probably don't need an extract, either, to get good benefits (though I would probably get one just for extra potency). I have been thinking of getting some myself from kalyx.com but I have not seen too many reviews of their products.

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#3 sUper GeNius

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 11:04 PM

There've been some pretty good studies with bilberry and people don't usually notice a supplement's action like with bilberry. I don't really know why you'd even want to supplement blueberries, to be honest. Bilberries are almost certainly more bang for the buck. You probably don't need an extract, either, to get good benefits (though I would probably get one just for extra potency). I have been thinking of getting some myself from kalyx.com but I have not seen too many reviews of their products.


Why blueberries? There have been some impressive studies with senescent mice regaining youthful motor skills.

#4 sUper GeNius

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 11:15 PM

Although I eat blueberries, I probably don't eat them often enough. I also tend to suffer from 'blue mouth' disease if I eat them too often (meaning my teeth turn all blue).

I looked over some of the blueberry supplements out there, and am not sure which to choose, if any.

LEF's is a bit expensive, for the anthocyanins per capsule (12.5), assuming their newer product contains the same as their old one did. It's a bit hard to tell now, as they seem to purposely not mention the amount of anthocyanins in their extract. They now include Aurora Blue, but at 50mg I'm not sure it's really enough to do much. They also don't mention how much Pterostilbene is in their product, although they mention it in the product description.

Natural Factors has their BlueRich extract, which appears similar to LEF's in terms of anthocyanin content (12.5), but with less variety of extracts included. They are a lot cheaper though. There seems to be anecdotal reports of it lowering blood sugar + triglycerides (at iHerb anyway), possibly due to Alpha-glucosidase inhibition? This may be a good or bad thing, depending on a person's glucose levels.

FruitFast has a gel extract with 40mg of anthocyanins. But they are the most expensive, not available anywhere besides directly ordering from them, and I'm not sure how good a company they really are. They also claim powdered extracts have no health benefit, which doesn't seem so believable to me (sounds like a marketing ploy).

And then there are also bilberry extracts, usually at 25% anthocyanins. Their benefits should be similar, if not the same, as North American blueberries, so I have been considering them instead. They also have that whole 'vision benefit' thing going for them, but I'm not sure if the studies back that up so well. Jarrow and LEF have reasonably priced bilberry extracts.

So... are any of these worth supplementing with? Anybody out there ever notice vision improvement from using bilberry? Or should I just try to eat more blueberries and save my money?


How does this look? If I did the math correctly, looks like 24.5 mg anthocyanins, with some other good stuff.

#5 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 05:51 PM

I prescribe 1 cup of Wyman's frozen wild blueberries per day, available in stores everywhere, $7 for a three pound bag. :p Probably has 500mg of anthocyanin's or some similarly ridiculous large number compared with the supplement form.

edit: I wasn't far off, average blueberries (not even wild blueberries) have roughly 100-300mg anthocyanins per 100g. A 1 cup serving is 140g, so I'm getting at least 140-420mg of anthocyanin's, and possibly much more because they are wild blueberries. Can you afford to take 10+ capsules of blueberry extract a day?

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 08 February 2009 - 05:58 PM.


#6 nameless

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:03 PM

I prescribe 1 cup of Wyman's frozen wild blueberries per day, available in stores everywhere, $7 for a three pound bag. :p Probably has 500mg of anthocyanin's or some similarly ridiculous large number compared with the supplement form.

It's funny you mention that, but that's exactly what I used to do. I'd take Wyman's frozen blueberries, purchased in a giant bag at Costco, blend them with water and just drink it down. I'd sometimes add oats or other berries.

Then one day my blender broke, so I just ended up eating them instead, and contracted the deadly blue mouth disease. They are also sort of annoying to eat frozen all the time, but drinking them isn't too bad.

I probably should just go buy a new blender, shouldn't I? :)

As for bilberries, are there any differences between them and blueberries? Are they worth supplementing, or would it be a waste if you eat blueberries already?

#7 sUper GeNius

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:14 PM

I prescribe 1 cup of Wyman's frozen wild blueberries per day, available in stores everywhere, $7 for a three pound bag. :p Probably has 500mg of anthocyanin's or some similarly ridiculous large number compared with the supplement form.

edit: I wasn't far off, average blueberries (not even wild blueberries) have roughly 100-300mg anthocyanins per 100g. A 1 cup serving is 140g, so I'm getting at least 140-420mg of anthocyanin's, and possibly much more because they are wild blueberries. Can you afford to take 10+ capsules of blueberry extract a day?


Is that 100-300mg per 100g of fresh or dried blueberry? And you say 1 cup is 140g. Is that fresh or dried? If you are correct, than some of the labeling on the extracts I've read are grossly incorrect, as many equate their one dose to anywhere from 1/4 to 1 cup of fressh bluberries.

Do you have a link?

#8 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:24 PM

The 1 cup = 140g figure is for frozen (basically fresh) blueberries. Anthocyanin content per 100g given below should be for fresh blueberries, not for dried blueberries. I can only assume dried blueberries would be much higher. Here's one authoritative sounding source I found:

http://www.blueberry...ntioxidants.htm

The results presented in this presentation represent the first data on the total antioxidant capacity in blueberries. On a fresh weight basis, blueberries have the highest antioxidant capacity of all the fresh fruits and vegetables tested to date. However, considerable variability seemed to exist among the initial analyses that were performed on blueberry samples obtained from the commercial supermarket, suggesting that variation exists in the antioxidant capacity of different varieties of the Vaccinium species. We have previously analyzed the antioxidant capacity of anthocyanins (Wang et al., 1997) and other flavonoids (Cao et al., 1997) and found them to have 2 to 6 times the activity found in common antioxidants such as ascorbate, glutathione, etc. Thus, in our current studies, we also determined the anthocyanin and total phenolic concentrations in the different blueberry samples. Previous reports of anthocyanin content in blueberries have also indicated a large variation (Mazza and Miniati, 1993). Highbush blueberries have been reported to have an anthocyanin content of 25-495 mg/100 g (Mazza and Miniati, 1993). Highbush blueberry (V. cormbosum L.) and lowbush blueberry (Vacccinium angustifolium Ait.) are the primary species of blueberries used by the food industry in the United States. Rabbiteye blueberries (Vacccinium ashei Reade) grown in the southern U.S., have been reported to have an anthocyanin content of 210- (Tifblue) to 272- (Bluegem) mg/100 g (Gao and Mazza, 1994). Gao and Mazza (1994) reported, using HPLC techniques to measure anthocyanins, that most lowbush blueberry cultivars contained 150-200 mg anthocyanins/100 g and highbush blueberry samples contained about 100 mg anthocyanins/100 g. Bilberry (Vacccinium myrtillus L.), native to parts of Europe and northern regions of Asia, has been reported to have the highest anthocyanin content (300-698 mg anthocyanin/100 g)(Mazza and Miniata, 1993). Lowbush blueberries (V. angustifolium Ait.), which are grown in Maine and Eastern Canada, are reported to have about 138 mg anthocyanins per 100 g (Kalt and McDonald, 1996). We observed anthocyanin concentrations in the range of 62 mg/100 g for "Reveille" blueberries to 300 mg/100 g for bilberries (V. myrtillus L.). Our results in general seem to be a little lower than some of the other reports; however, the particular anthocyanin compound used as a standard and its associated molar absorption coefficient can influence the absolute amounts calculated. The 3-glucoside(s) and 3-galactoside(s) of delphinidin, malvidin, petunidin, cyanidin and peonidin are the primary anthocyanins that have been identified in blueberries (Mazza and Miniati, 1993; Gao and Mazza, 1994). Bilyk and Sapers (1986) found that 4 varieties of highbush blueberry ("Earliblue", "Weymouth", "Coville" and "Bluetta") had total anthocyanin concentrations that varied by about 15%. Anthocyanin content of the different blueberry samples was linearly related to the ORAC measurement (rxy = 0.77; p<0.01) (Fig. 2), however, the agreement as indicated by the correlation coefficient was not as high as between total phenolics and ORAC (rxy = 0.85; p<0.01) (Fig. 3) although both were significant.


They say anthocyanin content of blueberries is linearly related to the ORAC content, and we know wild blueberries have an ORAC rating at least 30-40% higher than standard blueberries, so the math is looking good.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 08 February 2009 - 06:28 PM.


#9 ajnast4r

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:35 PM

I prescribe 1 cup of Wyman's frozen wild blueberries per day, available in stores everywhere, $7 for a three pound bag. :p Probably has 500mg of anthocyanin's or some similarly ridiculous large number compared with the supplement form.

edit: I wasn't far off, average blueberries (not even wild blueberries) have roughly 100-300mg anthocyanins per 100g. A 1 cup serving is 140g, so I'm getting at least 140-420mg of anthocyanin's, and possibly much more because they are wild blueberries. Can you afford to take 10+ capsules of blueberry extract a day?


i JUST had a morning power shake with 1cup of those... there is always a 3lb bag in my fridge, and i always have 1/2-1cup in the morning.

supplementing blueberry pills is pointless when a) the fruit is way less expensive than supplements b) you get way more anthocyanins than you could ever find in a pill c) they are SO delicious

#10 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:42 PM

It's funny you mention that, but that's exactly what I used to do. I'd take Wyman's frozen blueberries, purchased in a giant bag at Costco, blend them with water and just drink it down. I'd sometimes add oats or other berries.

Then one day my blender broke, so I just ended up eating them instead, and contracted the deadly blue mouth disease. They are also sort of annoying to eat frozen all the time, but drinking them isn't too bad.


What I do is mix the frozen blueberries with hot unsweetened oatmeal, and the hot water from the oatmeal melts the blueberries so that the final mixture ends up around room temperature. Then I add whey protein, one packet of stevia and mix thoroughly. It does make my teeth and tongue blue but I eat this for breakfast (w/ 42g of 88% dark chocolate) so I brush my teeth before I leave the house.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 08 February 2009 - 06:44 PM.


#11 sUper GeNius

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 07:15 PM

The 1 cup = 140g figure is for frozen (basically fresh) blueberries. Anthocyanin content per 100g given below should be for fresh blueberries, not for dried blueberries. I can only assume dried blueberries would be much higher. Here's one authoritative sounding source I found:

http://www.blueberry...ntioxidants.htm

The results presented in this presentation represent the first data on the total antioxidant capacity in blueberries. On a fresh weight basis, blueberries have the highest antioxidant capacity of all the fresh fruits and vegetables tested to date. However, considerable variability seemed to exist among the initial analyses that were performed on blueberry samples obtained from the commercial supermarket, suggesting that variation exists in the antioxidant capacity of different varieties of the Vaccinium species. We have previously analyzed the antioxidant capacity of anthocyanins (Wang et al., 1997) and other flavonoids (Cao et al., 1997) and found them to have 2 to 6 times the activity found in common antioxidants such as ascorbate, glutathione, etc. Thus, in our current studies, we also determined the anthocyanin and total phenolic concentrations in the different blueberry samples. Previous reports of anthocyanin content in blueberries have also indicated a large variation (Mazza and Miniati, 1993). Highbush blueberries have been reported to have an anthocyanin content of 25-495 mg/100 g (Mazza and Miniati, 1993). Highbush blueberry (V. cormbosum L.) and lowbush blueberry (Vacccinium angustifolium Ait.) are the primary species of blueberries used by the food industry in the United States. Rabbiteye blueberries (Vacccinium ashei Reade) grown in the southern U.S., have been reported to have an anthocyanin content of 210- (Tifblue) to 272- (Bluegem) mg/100 g (Gao and Mazza, 1994). Gao and Mazza (1994) reported, using HPLC techniques to measure anthocyanins, that most lowbush blueberry cultivars contained 150-200 mg anthocyanins/100 g and highbush blueberry samples contained about 100 mg anthocyanins/100 g. Bilberry (Vacccinium myrtillus L.), native to parts of Europe and northern regions of Asia, has been reported to have the highest anthocyanin content (300-698 mg anthocyanin/100 g)(Mazza and Miniata, 1993). Lowbush blueberries (V. angustifolium Ait.), which are grown in Maine and Eastern Canada, are reported to have about 138 mg anthocyanins per 100 g (Kalt and McDonald, 1996). We observed anthocyanin concentrations in the range of 62 mg/100 g for "Reveille" blueberries to 300 mg/100 g for bilberries (V. myrtillus L.). Our results in general seem to be a little lower than some of the other reports; however, the particular anthocyanin compound used as a standard and its associated molar absorption coefficient can influence the absolute amounts calculated. The 3-glucoside(s) and 3-galactoside(s) of delphinidin, malvidin, petunidin, cyanidin and peonidin are the primary anthocyanins that have been identified in blueberries (Mazza and Miniati, 1993; Gao and Mazza, 1994). Bilyk and Sapers (1986) found that 4 varieties of highbush blueberry ("Earliblue", "Weymouth", "Coville" and "Bluetta") had total anthocyanin concentrations that varied by about 15%. Anthocyanin content of the different blueberry samples was linearly related to the ORAC measurement (rxy = 0.77; p<0.01) (Fig. 2), however, the agreement as indicated by the correlation coefficient was not as high as between total phenolics and ORAC (rxy = 0.85; p<0.01) (Fig. 3) although both were significant.


They say anthocyanin content of blueberries is linearly related to the ORAC content, and we know wild blueberries have an ORAC rating at least 30-40% higher than standard blueberries, so the math is looking good.


How do you know that they are measuring anthocyanin content in fresh blueberries? Does it specifically say that somewhere? If they are measuring it from dried, then the anthocyanin content per cup of fresh blueberries would be much lower.

For instance, in tis study, they're using dry weight.

http://cat.inist.fr/...cpsidt=19957002


Saskatoon berry, raspberry, chokecherry, strawberry, and seabuckthorn) were studied for their anthocyanin compositions (mg/100 g) on dry weight basis. Saskatoon berry and wild blueberry showed a high content of total anthocyanins (562.4 and 558.3 mg/100 g, respectively) that were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from each other

Edited by FuLL meMbeR, 08 February 2009 - 07:18 PM.


#12 nameless

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 07:17 PM

What I do is mix the frozen blueberries with hot unsweetened oatmeal, and the hot water from the oatmeal melts the blueberries so that the final mixture ends up around room temperature. Then I add whey protein, one packet of stevia and mix thoroughly. It does make my teeth and tongue blue but I eat this for breakfast (w/ 42g of 88% dark chocolate) so I brush my teeth before I leave the house.

That does sound pretty tasty. Maybe I'll try that with cooked oat bran, but probably substituting a little honey instead of the stevia.

I wasn't aware of the large anthocyanin discrepancy between the supplement form and real blueberries. It really doesn't make sense to supplement, unless a person can't tolerate the sugar from blueberries, I suppose. But it's not like they have a ton of sugar to begin with. And I haven't read anything that makes me think Bilberries are of greater benefit than blueberries -- I expect it's simply anthocyanin content that matters, and real blueberries would have more than a bilberry extract would.

Pterostilbene could be one exception though. I suppose it may be worth supplementing with an extract with a high content, as I'm not sure if all blueberry species contain decent amounts of Pterostilbene. I contacted Wyman's a long time ago, trying to figure out how much, if any, Pterostilbene was in their blueberries. But they never responded. Interesting if anyone can figure that out somehow.

#13 sUper GeNius

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 07:39 PM

I think this would be the definitive source:

http://www.nal.usda....av/Flav02-1.pdf

Values in the database are reported as mg/100g of fresh weight of edible portion of food.


#14 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 08:27 PM

That source indicates about 92mg of anthocyanins per 100g of frozen blueberries, 164mg per 100g of fresh blueberries, and 321mg per 100g of fresh wild blueberries. I wonder what 100g of frozen wild blueberries would be? If we assume the same difference between frozen vs. fresh regular blueberries, frozen wild blueberries would have 180mg per 100g.

So, 1 cup of frozen wild blueberries would have 252mg of anthocyanins, equivalent to twenty capsules of 12.5mg anthocyanin blueberry extract.

#15 sUper GeNius

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:00 PM

That source indicates about 92mg of anthocyanins per 100g of frozen blueberries, 164mg per 100g of fresh blueberries, and 321mg per 100g of fresh wild blueberries. I wonder what 100g of frozen wild blueberries would be? If we assume the same difference between frozen vs. fresh regular blueberries, frozen wild blueberries would have 180mg per 100g.

So, 1 cup of frozen wild blueberries would have 252mg of anthocyanins, equivalent to twenty capsules of 12.5mg anthocyanin blueberry extract.


How much does a cup of frozen wild blueberries cost?

#16 Lufega

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:21 PM

Funk, do you feel sharper after eating frozen blueberries?

Nameless, I used the Natural Factors blueberry formula at 12 pills per day in 3 doses for a few months. I was attracted to this brand by the price and it was a total waste of money. It did nothing for me. I then switched to the FruitFast gel caps and at 2 pills per day I noticed a huge difference in the speed of recall and processing time. I was very impressed. I then switched to their fruit bars thinking I was getting more anthocyanins for my buck and after buying a 4 month supply at a bar per day, I realized that most of the anthocyanins came from apple puree and the blueberry IQ formula was last in the ingredients. I don't get the same effect from the bars as I do from the gel caps even when I eat 4 per day! I live outside the US right now and I don't have access to fresh or even frozen blueberries so I have to rely on pills. Anyways, blueberries are a definite keeper in my stack.

#17 nameless

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:44 PM

Wyam's at Costco used to cost me $9 for a 4lb bag, which I think was around 13 servings. So it'd be about $20/month for approx. 252mg anthocyanins/daily, assuming the above calculations are correct.

I think I'll invest in a new blender and pick up some next time I visit Costco. Pricewise, it's a better deal than the extracts.

Regarding the Natural Factors extract vs the FruitFast one, that's interesting. I avoided the bars after I noticed the apple content too, and after someone here commented that they were slimy. FruitFast may be a decent alternative for folks who can't get real blueberries then. And their anthocyanin content per pill is the highest I've seen.

#18 torrential

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:39 PM

The frozen Costco blueberries in my freezer are organic. I wonder if the numbers are different than for the (presumably) non-organic raw listing in the USDA data.

#19 nameless

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:50 PM

The frozen Costco blueberries in my freezer are organic. I wonder if the numbers are different than for the (presumably) non-organic raw listing in the USDA data.

What brand are your organic blueberries? Wyman's aren't organic, that I know of. I can never find organic frozen blueberries anywhere.

#20 torrential

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 11:17 PM

Scenic Fruit Co. out of Gresham, Oregon. USDA organic + Oregon Tilth. Agree: Frozen organic blueberries hard to find and/or very expensive. I think the price was around seven or eight bucks for a three pound bag. At Whole Foods I see ten ounce bags for $4.99, which works out to three times more.

#21 niner

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 06:49 AM

Since it hasn't been mentioned yet, Trader Joe's has frozen Organic Wild Blueberries, and they taste distinctly better than regular giant blueberries. The wild variety are pretty small, maybe a quarter inch in diameter. I forget exactly what they cost, but it was a pretty good deal as I recall. If you're lucky enough to live near a TJ's it's worth your consideration as a blueberry source.

#22 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 04:07 PM

Funk, do you feel sharper after eating frozen blueberries?


Its difficult to say because I eat and take and do so many things that should improve cognitive function, and on the other hand, I have a disease that dramatically worsens cognitive function. Its hard to determine the impact that individual factors make but I think my overall regimen is highly effective considering the fact that I probably look like I'm retarded or suffering from dementia on a SPECT scan.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 09 February 2009 - 04:07 PM.


#23 RoadToAwe

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 06:18 PM

You can try Swanson's wild blueberry extract:
http://www.swansonvi...R038/ItemDetail


It is 90 pills for 8 dollars. 2 Pills(500 mg of VitaBlue) should provide approximately 62.5mg of Anthocyanins.

VitaBlue comes from Van Drunen Farms who are a supplier of fruit and vegetable extracts to major supplement companies including LEF. VitaBlue contains approximately 12.5% Anthocyanins.

http://www.futureceu...taline#VitaBlue

#24 nameless

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 06:42 PM

The Swanson product doesn't state the percentage of Anthocyanins, or at least I don't see where it does. Looking up the old LEF blueberry extract with VitaBlue, we have:

VitaBlue Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) 150:1 extract (fruit) [std to 1000 ppm Pterostilbene (0.1 mg), and 1% Anthocyanins (1 mg)]

and

VitaBlue Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) 130:1 extract (fruit) [std. to 40% Total Phenolics by UV (20 mg), and 12.5% Anthocyanins (6.25 mg)]

So if it is using the first VitaBlue extract, it'd have 1% Anthocyanins. And since the Swanson product states it has .1% Pterostilbene, I'd guess that'd be the one it uses? It's hard to tell without a breakdown on the product label.

Edited by nameless, 09 February 2009 - 06:44 PM.


#25 RoadToAwe

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 07:07 PM

You are right. I did not realize that there are two different VitaBlues! Most probably the Swanson product has only 1% anthocyanins in which case its not a good deal.

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#26 mattblack UK

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 11:07 AM

Has anyone tried this?

http://www.revital.c...Blueberry_Punch

or would anyone recommend?




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