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Magnesium Stearate?


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#1 HOTCells

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 04:38 PM


I did a search on Magnesium stearate here and found some info, but not much. I understannd that it's in plants/animals, but so are parabens and other potentially harmful chemicals. Is there a consensus about this ingredient? Is it safe in the way that manufactures are using mag. stearate in supplements. I have been taking Swanson brand supplements for some time, and this company seem to use a heavy hand with this ingredient. I take about 20 of their supplements daily, all which contain Magnesium stearate or stearic acid.

Thanks.

#2 ironchet

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 05:20 PM

I did a search on Magnesium stearate here and found some info, but not much. I understannd that it's in plants/animals, but so are parabens and other potentially harmful chemicals. Is there a consensus about this ingredient? Is it safe in the way that manufactures are using mag. stearate in supplements. I have been taking Swanson brand supplements for some time, and this company seem to use a heavy hand with this ingredient. I take about 20 of their supplements daily, all which contain Magnesium stearate or stearic acid.

Thanks.


Magnesium stearate could potentially be harmful and may impair your immune system according to Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt in this video (around 2 min mark)

Hidden Dangers of Nutritional Supplements You Should Be Aware Of

The R-Lipoic Acid I'm currently taking has magnesium stearate. I've been trying to find the powder form but so far no luck.

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#3 4eva

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 05:35 PM

The R-Lipoic Acid I'm currently taking has magnesium stearate. I've been trying to find the powder form but so far no luck.


Purebulk.com has an RS-ALA. I'm not sure what the difference is between RS and R ALA.

Unfortunately all quantities seem to be sold out right now.
But they sell many other supplements without any additives (more than 327). They also provide volumetric equivalents so you know how many miligrams in an 1/8 of a teaspoon, for example, of each powder.

http://purebulk.com/...0f375bc147b03b6

#4 nameless

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 06:15 PM

To the best of my knowledge, the amount of magnesium stearate in most supplements is minimal. I think they use it during the capsule/supplement manufacturing process. I wouldn't worry about it too much, but if an issue try to find veggie caps without mag stearate from other manufacturers.

#5 david ellis

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 06:32 AM

Magnesium stearate could potentially be harmful and may impair your immune system according to Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt in this video (around 2 min mark) Hidden Dangers of Nutritional Supplements You Should Be Aware Of


I did a little searching on PubMed and couldn't find the science behind Dr Klinghardt's warning. I searched the highly regarded AOR and Relentless Improvement websites and found that both use magnesium stearate. If the magnesium stearate warning is true, then these highly regarded companies are selling products dangerous to our health. I don't think so. This sounds to me like a sneaky way to dismiss someone else's products. Is there any other evidence?

#6 prophets

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 07:33 PM

re: magnesium deficiency

http://www.scienceda...90324213335.htm

#7 yoyo

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 05:31 AM

its quite inert.

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#8 kilgoretrout

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 03:59 AM

I did a search on Magnesium stearate here and found some info, but not much. I understannd that it's in plants/animals, but so are parabens and other potentially harmful chemicals. Is there a consensus about this ingredient? Is it safe in the way that manufactures are using mag. stearate in supplements. I have been taking Swanson brand supplements for some time, and this company seem to use a heavy hand with this ingredient. I take about 20 of their supplements daily, all which contain Magnesium stearate or stearic acid.

Thanks.


Magnesium stearate could potentially be harmful and may impair your immune system according to Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt in this video (around 2 min mark)

Hidden Dangers of Nutritional Supplements You Should Be Aware Of

The R-Lipoic Acid I'm currently taking has magnesium stearate. I've been trying to find the powder form but so far no luck.




I wouldn't worry about it. see:

http://www.metagenic...eneral_faqs.asp

Q: I noticed that some Metagenics products contain stearic acid. I was reading a report that magnesium stearate suppresses the immune system through T cell suppression. Is this true and should I be worried?

A: Stearic acid is a naturally occurring fat that is present in all of our bodies. Some nutritional supplement manufacturers, however, would like you to believe that stearic acid (or its salt, magnesium stearate) is a bad thing. They've focused on one small ingredient and created widespread misconceptions about its use and its effects on health. Most formulations—whether in tablet or capsule form—require some added ingredients to assist in manufacture. A manufacturer of high quality nutritional supplements will ensure that excipients, binders, or dilutents are derived from natural sources.

Stearic acid, for example, may be of a vegetable origin. Stearic acid enables providers to manufacture tablets of uniform size, weight, texture, and shape that help to ensure a pure, safe, and effective product. Both the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) recommend the use of stearic acid and magnesium stearate in the production of high quality nutritional and pharmaceutical products. According to Vitkova and Chalabala, "Magnesium stearate is the lubricant of choice in the production, found in up to 80% of all industrially produced tablets."1 It is important to note that the levels of stearic acid found in Metagenics products are very low—much lower than the levels used in human studies surrounding stearic acid.

Your question regarding magnesium stearate and immune dysfunction comes up a lot. While stearic acid is not considered a "beneficial" fat (such as those found in cold-water fish and flaxseed), it has not been shown to contribute to immune dysfunction in humans. In fact, most research documents just the opposite effect:

1. Stearic acid is a normal constituent of the body and immune system, including lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) and red blood cells. "Lecithin of leukemic lymphocytes contained more palmitinic acid and oleic acid and a lower level of stearic acid than the same fraction in normal lymphocytes."

Bleiber R, Kunze D, Reichmann G, et al. Leukocyte lipids in mature cell leukemia. Acta Haematol 1976;55(2):81-88.

"The fatty acid compositions of 1,2-diacylglycerol and polyphosphoinositides have been determined in human erythrocyte membranes [red blood cells]…it appears that these plasma-membrane polyphosphoinositides and their derived diacylglycerols are rich in stearic acid and arachidonic acid."

Allan D, Cockcroft S. The fatty acid composition of 1,2-diacylglycerol and polyphosphoinositides from human erythrocyte membranes. Biochem J 1983;213(2):555-57.

2. Stearic acid seems to activate components of the immune system (i.e., neutrophils) instead of suppress it.

"…the polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid, the triglycerides tricaproin, tricaprylin, and trilaurin as well as the fatty acids lauric acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, and arachidic acid all induced oxygen radical production in neutrophils…"

Wanten GJ, Janssen FP, Naber AH. Saturated triglycerides and fatty acids activate neutrophils depending on carbon chain-length. Eur J Clin Invest 2002;32(4):285-89.

Vitkova M, Chalabala M. The use of some hydrophobic substances in tablet technology. Acta Pharm Hung 1998;68(6):336-44.






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