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Pure IGF being heavily promoted by LifeExtension- looks doubtful to me


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#1 RCollins

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:24 PM


I recently placed an order with Life Extension Foundation for some supplements. When I received the supplements there was a special promotional advertisement included in the package. It was a brightly colored glossy advertisement on a 7 by 5 inch card promoting "Pure IGF the natural anti-aging growth factor supplement", which is made by a company called "Pure Solutions, Inc."

The advertisement went on to say "As we age, our Human Growth Hormone production decreases, and thus so does our production of vitality promoting Growth Factors. Now, thanks to a revolutionary discovery, these Growth Factors are available in a pure form."

The LifeExtension logo is printed right on the card along with their telephone number to order anytime. Next to that is the statement "Pure IGF is the most important supplement you should be taking. Everyday!" Wow, I have never known the Life Extension Foundation to endorse any product so emphatically. They actually call it "the most important supplement you should be taking." I wonder if those are Bill Faloon's own words?

I have seen this product for sale in stores also. The label says that it is an extract of velvet deer antler which contains IGF-1 and several other growth factors. However the amount of IGF-1 or any of the other growth factors is not listed. It just says that there is 5mg of the antler extract in each dose and that includes some of those growth factors. They cleverly avoid listing how much, or how little, of those growth factors are actually included in 5mg of the extract. I guess if there was at least 1/10 of a microgram of IGF-1 in the bottle, they could claim that it was not falsely labeled.

But the revolutionary discovery is "deer antler" extract? Hasn't that stuff been promoted by direct marketers for decades? And it is known that caloric restriction diets that increase longevity actually decrease IGF-1 levels, not increase them.

Tell me if I am missing something, but in my opinion this stuff looks about as close to worthless as you can get. I am suprised that LifeExtension Foundation is calling it the most important supplement you can take, and it makes me wonder if I should be buying any supplements at all from them. How can you trust a company that could promote something like this?

Does anyone else have any opinions on this product, "Pure IGF"?

#2 krillin

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 10:40 PM

LEF isn't very good at due diligence.

Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet
Rachel C. Angers,1 Tanya S. Seward, Dana Napier, Michael Green, Edward Hoover, Terry Spraker, Katherine O’Rourke, Aru Balachandran, and Glenn C. Telling
Author affiliations: University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky, USA (R.C. Angers, T.S. Seward, D. Napier, M. Green, G.C. Telling); Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (E. Hoover, T. Spraker); US Department of Agriculture, Pullman, Washington, USA (K. O’Rourke); and Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (A. Balachandran)
1Current affiliation: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious, fatal prion disease of deer and elk that continues to emerge in new locations. To explore the means by which prions are transmitted with high efficiency among cervids, we examined prion infectivity in the apical skin layer covering the growing antler (antler velvet) by using CWD-susceptible transgenic mice and protein misfolding cyclic amplification. Our finding of prions in antler velvet of CWD-affected elk suggests that this tissue may play a role in disease transmission among cervids. Humans who consume antler velvet as a nutritional supplement are at risk for exposure to prions. The fact that CWD prion incubation times in transgenic mice expressing elk prion protein are consistently more rapid raises the possibility that residue 226, the sole primary structural difference between deer and elk prion protein, may be a major determinant of CWD pathogenesis.

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#3 Lufega

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:32 PM

Wooops...yeah. So, I tried this product last year. It burns the underside of your tongue and mouth and for the 1 week I was using it, I lost my ability to get an erection. Problem went away when I stopped it. Soooo.....I threw the rest away.

#4 OneScrewLoose

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 11:55 PM

Well my respect for LEF just went down a few notches...

#5 nameless

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 12:59 AM

I never understood why anyone here held LEF in high regard to begin with, to be honest. They are better than some companies, but their formulations are clearly geared towards marketing over science. I recall several times getting information about their products from their support people that was clearly incorrect -- quite often about their own product labeling or statements they were making to sell their products.

#6 renwosing

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 09:24 AM

Just get rHGH. Only by injection.

Renwosing

#7 hamishm00

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 11:20 AM

Shocking.

This has to be as big a scam as the trans-dermal "homoepathic" HGH patches. At least the trans-dermal application could rebut any criticism of the stuff not making it through the digestive system, except the homeopathic aspect ruled out any credibility for me, because it's completely untested for HGH.

#8 M Snow Knows

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 07:12 PM

This Message Board Was Forwarded to me by a concerned friend.....

Let’s get the facts straight…it is obvious that the people in this forum spend too much time on Google doing research on topics they have no basis for making arguments on.

I am currently working on my masters/ PhD in Exercise Science; I have an undergrad degree in Exercise Science from a major top tier university and a wall of certifications in health and human performance.

I can't believe you guys post before thinking. IGF is made up of Amino Acids, amino acids are proteins…proteins are the building blocks for almost every body function /organ function /endocrine function in your body.

I have clinical research that was shared with my by the New Zealand Government ….to help me in writing my thesis for my doctorate…(which is The Function of Amino Acids and Growth Factors on the Glycogen Levels and Red Blood Cell Count for Endurance Athletes). The research given to me on an 8:1 extract delivered 600 nanograms per MILLIGRAM. That means that if you have an extract that is like that from Pure Solutions which is 43:1, it would deliver 3,220 nanograms per milligram.

So if you are taking a dose of 5 mg X 3,220 nanograms/ mg = 16,100 nanograms per bottle

People have been using this supplement for over 2000 years throughout the realm of eastern medicine, but there has never been an extract at the strength that is available in today’s market. Not only has the strength increased, the way they process, deliver and package the supplement has improved. That’s why it burns....it is mixed with alcohol.....the purpose of the alcohol is to stimulate one’s Buccal Mucosa glands, which are responsible for the absorption of sublingual supplements.

If I were going to be concerned about supplements on the market I would look at some of the fish oils, which have high contents of mercury, causing mercury poisoning, or glucosamine and chondroitin which is derived from bovine (cows) and chickens, causing salmonella or mad cow disease, or water soluble vitamins actually not being able to be absorbed, or even function, or supplements like Resveratol, used for anti-aging causing stomach pains and only having testing which was done on lab rats with no long standing history of use.

I took it upon myself to contact the company and express my concerns, which they were more than willing and able to address. They actually invited all concerned customers to call 800.895.4415 regarding the product.

I have been a satisfied customer of Life Extension for several years and not only has their Customer Service been unmatched by any other company, from what I have seen on their website, they only provide the highest quality supplements (backed by outside research, along with their own), that are on the market today, and I recommend them to all of my clients when ordering supplements.

Here is a link that Shows the Quality Of Velvet Antler Produced in New Zealand,

They have never had any issue of chronic wasting disease, nor many other diseases, as detailed by their ministry of agriculture.

http://www.biosecuri...mt/surv/freedom

#9 kismet

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 09:10 PM

Let's get the facts straight…it is obvious that the people in this forum spend too much time on Google doing research on topics they have no basis for making arguments on.

Yes, you should always start your argument with an ad hominem attack.

People have been using this supplement for over 2000 years throughout the realm of eastern medicine, but there has never been an extract at the strength that is available in today's market.

Eastern medicine, I see.

If I were going to be concerned about supplements on the market I would look at some of the fish oils, which have high contents of mercury, causing mercury poisoning

I thought most if not all fish oils tested negative and according to wikipedia glucosamine is derived from shellfish.

They have never had any issue of chronic wasting disease, nor many other diseases, as detailed by their ministry of agriculture.

That's actually good news and the only meaningful point your friend made. However, what if the disease emerges there, will LEF react fast enough? Would their customers be at risk?

The biggest problem is that even if it was efficacious and safe, most evidence points to IGF shortening life span, not extending it.

#10 M Snow Knows

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 09:34 PM

wikipedia.....That would classify as not doing proper research...99% professors would throw a paper away citied by wikipedia. There has never once been a case of wasting disease derived from New Zealand deer antler. Never once has a case been even documented.I not trying to offend anyone, helping people achieve a healthier life without the use of prescription medicine is my life passion and I take it as a very serious issue.

#11 Mind

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 11:28 PM

Ok, enough side banter. It is too interesting of a topic to waste. I have to admit that I am wary of the "eastern medicine" marketing angle because so many companies of lower quality and standards than LEF use it constantly.

However, IGF1 is know as one of the most significant aging pathways in mammals and primates. More IGF1=faster aging. I think this is well established in the literature (Dr. Fontana mentioned it last night during the interview). Is this deer velvet IGF substantially different from endogenous IGF? I suppose it could improve strength but it seems you would likely be cutting a few years off your life.

#12 kismet

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 09:47 AM

wikipedia.....That would classify as not doing proper research...99% professors would throw a paper away citied by wikipedia.

That classifies as a. selective quoting, b. a strawmen, c. maybe even poisoning the well. I beg you to stop (for the sake of a mature conversation).
I suppose you believe the product is good. Then, would you be so kind as to address my concerns? Which Mind just seconded.

#13 neogenic

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 01:57 PM

I am waiting for this reply as well. Also what about the PRION issue brought up earlier in the thread as well. Also, I do, in fact, have research...now, if you need the full studies posted I will get them. I know the age old answer to any negative research will be: BUT IT IS NOT OUR EXTRACT, which is of higher quality of course...of course.

Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2005 Aug;15(4):366-85.Links
Effect of elk velvet antler supplementation on the hormonal response to acute and chronic exercise in male and female rowers.

Syrotuik DG, MacFadyen KL, Harber VJ, Bell GJ.
Faculty of Physical Educatin and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
To examine the effects of elk velvet antler supplementation (EVA) combined with training on resting and exercise-stimulated hormonal response, male (n = 25) and female (n = 21) rowers ingested either EVA (560 mg/d) or placebo (PL) during 10 wk of training. VO(2max), 2000 m rowing time, leg and bench press strength were determined before and after 5 and 10 wk of training. Serum hormone levels were measured prior to and 5 and 60 min after a simulated 2000 m rowing race. VO(2max)and strength increased and 2000 m times decreased similarly (P < 0.05) with training. There was no significant difference between the EVA and PL group for any hormonal response. Testosterone (males only) and growth hormone (both genders) were higher 5 min after the simulated race (P < 0.05) but returned to baseline at 60 min. Cortisol was higher 5 and 60 min compared to rest (both genders) (P < 0.05) and was higher 60 min post-exercise following 5 and 10 wk of training. It appears that 10 wk of EVA supplementation does not significantly improve rowing performance nor alter hormonal responses at rest or after acute exercise than training alone.

Biol Res Nurs. 2008 Jan;9(3):254-61. Links
A randomized clinical trial of elk velvet antler in rheumatoid arthritis.

Allen M, Oberle K, Grace M, Russell A, Adewale AJ.
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. marion.allen@ualberta.ca
This article examines the effects of elk velvet antler on joint pain and swelling, patient/physician global assessment of disease activity, functional ability, quality of life, blood levels of C-reactive protein, and adverse events in persons with stage 2 to 3 rheumatoid arthritis experiencing residual symptoms after standard treatment. Patients (N=168) were enrolled in a 6-month randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Instruments included the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, tender and swollen joint counts, and 100 mm-length visual analogue scales, along with blood tests. There were no significant differences between groups on any measures. The pattern of change of the measures across time points was essentially the same for both groups. Although some patients reported clinical improvements in their symptoms, there were no statistically significant differences between groups. Overall, elk velvet antler does not effectively manage residual symptoms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2003 Sep;13(3):251-65.Links
The effects of deer antler velvet extract or powder supplementation on aerobic power, erythropoiesis, and muscular strength and endurance characteristics.

Sleivert G, Burke V, Palmer C, Walmsley A, Gerrard D, Haines S, Littlejohn R.
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3.
To determine the effects of deer antler velvet on maximal aerobic performance and the trainability of muscular strength and endurance, 38 active males were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to either deer antler velvet extract (n = 12), powder (n = 13), or placebo groups (n = 13). Subjects were tested prior to beginning supplementation and a 10-week strength program, and immediately post-training. All subjects were measured for circulating levels of testosterone, insulin-like growth factor, erythropoietin, red cell mass, plasma volume, and total blood volume. Additionally, muscular strength, endurance, and VO2max were determined. All groups improved 6 RM strength equivalently (41 +/- 26%, p < .001), but there was a greater increase in isokinetic knee extensor strength (30 +/- 21% vs. 13 +/- 15%, p = .04) and endurance (21 +/- 19% vs. 7 +/- 12%, p = .02) in the powder compared to placebo group. There were no endocrine, red cell mass or VO2max changes in any group. These findings do not support an erythropoetic or aerobic ergogenic effect of deer antler velvet. Further, the inconsistent findings regarding the effects of deer antler velvet powder supplementation on the development of strength suggests that further work is required to test the robustness of the observation that this supplement enhances the strength training response and to ensure this observation is not a type I error.

#14 kismet

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:25 PM

As of now the even evidence in favour of real hGH supplementation (s.c. injection) is not particularly strong. What are we missing?

Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jan 16;146(2):104-15.
Systematic review: the safety and efficacy of growth hormone in the healthy elderly.
Liu H, Bravata DM, Olkin I, Nayak S, Roberts B, Garber AM, Hoffman AR.
"The literature published on randomized, controlled trials evaluating GH therapy in the healthy elderly is limited but suggests that it is associated with small changes in body composition and increased rates of adverse events [e.g. diabetes and glucose intolerance]. On the basis of this evidence, GH cannot be recommended as an antiaging therapy."

#15 krillin

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 04:07 AM

I thought most if not all fish oils tested negative and according to wikipedia glucosamine is derived from shellfish.

In the shill's defense, he said "glucosamine and chondroitin" and chondroitin is sourced from bovine trachea.

#16 bgwithadd

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 07:37 AM

I love how everyone assumes amino acids are harmless. Pretty much everything is made of amino acids, but many (if not most) amino acids taken in high doses are harmful.

If people were going to get a disease from it it seems they'd have gotten it long since by now and blamed the supplement on it. I doubt it's actually harmful, but the helpfulness is questionable. Unless you're going for full replacement I just don't think any hormone therapy will be of much use, anyway.

#17 biknut

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 01:36 PM

I used this product for about 2 years. I never felt any ill effects from it, but I also didn't notice anything positive. It's very expensive. I finally decided to stop taking it because I didn't think there was much bang for the buck. There's no convincing scientific studies that show this particular product being beneficial, all the evidence seems to be indirect. If that were to change in the future I would probably consider it again.

#18 thefirstimmortal

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 07:06 PM

But the revolutionary discovery is "deer antler" extract? Hasn't that stuff been promoted by direct marketers for decades?


The deer antler extract has been sold and promoted by LEF since the 80's. Back than it was promoted for helping with better umm, bedroom prformance. But it was just sold as deer antler extract. I haven't noticed the new promotion.

#19 kismet

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Posted 10 May 2009 - 07:09 PM

Surprise, surprise it's not ergogenic: http://www.ergo-log.com/antler.html

#20 smithx

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Posted 12 May 2009 - 01:13 PM

I can't believe you guys post before thinking. IGF is made up of Amino Acids, amino acids are proteins…proteins are the building blocks for almost every body function /organ function /endocrine function in your body.


Cool, so anything made of amino acids is safe and wholesome to put in your body?

Try telling that to a pregnant woman when giving her a whiff of oxytocin before she's supposed to give birth. Whoops, induced labor.

Since they're all made of amino acids, I'm sure you think it's just fine to take as much luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, prolactin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, growth hormone, vasopressin, atrial-natriuretic peptide, atrial natriuretic factor, insulin, somatostatin, cholecystokinin, gastrin, and leptin that you want.

Try doing that for a few months, and when you get out of the hospital, please report back.

If all the posts on here had the quality of yours, it wouldn't be worth reading them.

Go back to your exercises. You clearly know nothing about biology.

Edited by smithx, 12 May 2009 - 01:15 PM.


#21 doctor g

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 12:37 AM

I recently placed an order with Life Extension Foundation for some supplements. When I received the supplements there was a special promotional advertisement included in the package. It was a brightly colored glossy advertisement on a 7 by 5 inch card promoting "Pure IGF the natural anti-aging growth factor supplement", which is made by a company called "Pure Solutions, Inc."

The advertisement went on to say "As we age, our Human Growth Hormone production decreases, and thus so does our production of vitality promoting Growth Factors. Now, thanks to a revolutionary discovery, these Growth Factors are available in a pure form."

The LifeExtension logo is printed right on the card along with their telephone number to order anytime. Next to that is the statement "Pure IGF is the most important supplement you should be taking. Everyday!" Wow, I have never known the Life Extension Foundation to endorse any product so emphatically. They actually call it "the most important supplement you should be taking." I wonder if those are Bill Faloon's own words?

I have seen this product for sale in stores also. The label says that it is an extract of velvet deer antler which contains IGF-1 and several other growth factors. However the amount of IGF-1 or any of the other growth factors is not listed. It just says that there is 5mg of the antler extract in each dose and that includes some of those growth factors. They cleverly avoid listing how much, or how little, of those growth factors are actually included in 5mg of the extract. I guess if there was at least 1/10 of a microgram of IGF-1 in the bottle, they could claim that it was not falsely labeled.

But the revolutionary discovery is "deer antler" extract? Hasn't that stuff been promoted by direct marketers for decades? And it is known that caloric restriction diets that increase longevity actually decrease IGF-1 levels, not increase them.

Tell me if I am missing something, but in my opinion this stuff looks about as close to worthless as you can get. I am suprised that LifeExtension Foundation is calling it the most important supplement you can take, and it makes me wonder if I should be buying any supplements at all from them. How can you trust a company that could promote something like this?

Does anyone else have any opinions on this product, "Pure IGF"?

To tell you the truth, "Pure IGF" as promoted by LEF works fine for me. I have only been taking it for 2 months but already I feel more energetic
and to a certain degree rejuvenated. I am 60 years old and I feel it lives up to its promotion by the LEF. However it takes several months of taking it so
I've heard, to notice major changes but like I said before it's working quite well for me.
Taking IGF supplements are better than taking HGH injections because of the uncomfortability of that and its easier and less expensive to take IGF tablets
or liquid.
Anyway, to each his own. We all have to do what we have to do and for me personally the LEF(of which I've been a member since 2002) has been a godsend for me, my family, friends and colleagues at work , so I have absolutely no complaints about them.
I'm sorry you feel this way about them but in a free society everyone has a right to their opinion including you.

I wish you all the best in your health endeavers.

Gregg Campbell

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#22 niner

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 01:03 AM

OK, doctor q, I'll take your anecdote under advisement. Another antler velvet supplement. Ha ha ha ha ah ha. See an earlier discussion on this. When I see the velvet, I run...




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