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A 26 Year Old Man Trapped in the Body of a 2 Year Old!


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#1 Skötkonung

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 07:49 PM


This is pretty interesting.
http://www.metro.co....p;in_page_id=64

I hate stories like this because they never answer any of the questions I have. For example: Does he have the mind of a normal 26 year old? The article says the only 'adult' thing he has are his teeth, but I can't tell they're just talking about physical features. Their parents dress him as a toddler, so maybe not, but who knows?

Edited by Skotkonung, 17 April 2009 - 07:51 PM.


#2 prophets

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 08:27 PM

Jerly's infantile features are remarkable, and the only thing he shares with an adult are his teeth,' said paediatrician Dr J. Ryndong.


^^ Meaning he does not have the brain of an adult. Indeed, it would be very hard to have a sufficient IQ of an adult level with the limited cranial space that he exhibits. He did not grow, and neither did his brain.

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#3 Aphrodite

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 07:50 PM

Curious Case Of 26-Year-Old Man With Toddler Body

A 26-year-old man trapped in the body of a 2-year-old toddler astonishes pediatricians. Jerly Lyngdoh, whose case is a medical rarity, lives with his parents in Meghalaya in northern India.

Lyngdoh was born 26 years ago, but his mind and body are that of a baby between 1 to 2 years old. He measures 33-inches tall and weighs 22 pounds, much like other 2-year-olds, India's Hindustan Times reported.

"Jerly's infantile features are remarkable, and the only things he shares with an adult are his teeth," pediatrician Dr. J. Ryndong told the Hindustan Times. "We think this is a case of pan-hypo pituitarism leading to poor secretion of growth hormones from pituitary glands."

All six of Lyngdoh's siblings are without mental or physical disability, ruling out the condition as genetic, doctors said.

A charitable society helped his mom, Merilda, bring him to the capital's Shillong Civil Hospital, where he has received treatment for 17 months before being transferred to Ganesh Das Hospital.

Lyngdoh, who relies on his parents totally, is just 4-inches taller than China's He Pingping, officially the world's smallest man, the United Kingdom's Metro news reported.
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#4 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 08:18 PM

That hat doesn't help anything either :|o

#5 gwgaston

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 08:39 PM

Already mentioned here as well:

http://www.imminst.o...showtopic=29293

#6 TheFountain

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 09:27 PM

"Jerly's infantile features are remarkable, and the only things he shares with an adult are his teeth," pediatrician Dr. J. Ryndong told the Hindustan Times. "We think this is a case of pan-hypo pituitarism leading to poor secretion of growth hormones from pituitary glands."

Then how does that explain his lack of mental maturity? Apparently, according to many clever an imminst member, pituitary disorders are independent of all else and have nothing to do with mental maturity or aging. Obviously mental maturity and aging run in tandem in most cases of 'growth hormone disorders' according to those who would have Andy Minolakis slayed for looking exactly like a 14 year old adolescent. So what is going on with this one?

#7 TheFountain

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 09:36 PM

^^ Meaning he does not have the brain of an adult. Indeed, it would be very hard to have a sufficient IQ of an adult level with the limited cranial space that he exhibits. He did not grow, and neither did his brain.


Emmanuel lewis has a very small head too, as well as a dozen other cited cases, yet the mind of a fully grown adult. So maybe mental maturity and pituitary disorders do not go hand in hand.

#8 JLL

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 09:52 AM

That hat doesn't help anything either :|o


Hahaha!

#9 VidX

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 01:08 PM

I'd speculate that body is working on a lot lower efficiency until it's fully developed/matured, less processes are involved, regenerative systems are able to use all the energy to keeping organism in an optimal state to reach the developed one. And well, for a maturity, if he's underdeveloped, so is his brain/neocortex, nothing surprisng about that IMHO.. It's like half built car - you'll be able to sit in it, listen to radio, or actually ride it, maybe very slowly, or just push down the hill and jump in it for a short ride lol, though unless you'll finish constructing it - it won't resemble/act like a fully developed "normal" car and so will be it's wear, slowed down. STupid analogy I know, just to illustrate the idea.

Edited by Divine, 19 April 2009 - 01:11 PM.


#10 maestro949

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 02:48 PM

The two topics for this story were merged.

#11 27GV

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 01:31 AM

Wow. Does that mean that you could artificially control the glands that cause development and growth? Say I wanted to stay 12 for another year. Bang. The thing turns off. Would that allow for longer life as more resources are put into repair rather than "growth"?

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#12 Elus

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 07:48 AM

I can't help but feel rather unexcited about this story. I look at that guy and I see someone who has had their development slowed. Isn't this just another case of extraordinarily slow development, rather than a slow rate of aging? What if his cells have aged, and his telomeres have shortened?

In my opinion, more tests should be conducted to ascertain his age on a cellular level. If he has indeed remained young, we could then study the means by which his cellular repairs mechanisms function and differ from normal ones. Either way, I'd like to see an in depth study.

Edited by Elus Efelier, 30 November 2009 - 07:48 AM.





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