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Chlorophyll Eye drops improve Night vision ?


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#1 Super K

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 04:48 PM


Is it really as simple as Chlorophyll eye drops ? Or is it just eating more greens ?

http://discovermagaz...e-night-vision/

... latest experiments in mice and rabbits suggest that administering chlorophyll to the eyes can double their ability to see in low light. The pigment absorbs hues of red light that are normally invisible in dim conditions. That information is then transmitted to the brain, allowing enhanced vision.

Washington is now developing ways to deliver chlorophyll to human eyes safely and easily, perhaps through drops. He believes that a night-vision drug would be most useful on the battlefield, so it is no surprise that the U.S. Department of Defense is funding his work. "The military would want this biological enhancement so they don't have to carry nighttime goggles" during operations in the dark, he says.



http://www.rsc.org/P...s_help_eyes.asp

Chlorophylls help eyes see red

31 May 2007

Eating your greens rather than carrots could be the key to good night-time vision, according to scientists in the US. Ilyas Washington and colleagues at Columbia University, New York, have shown that a chlorophyll derivative can enhance eye sensitivity to red light


Chlorophyll derivative chlorine e6 enhances eye sensitivity to red light.In sight, light activates a visual pigment that sends an electrical signal to the brain. This process happens in the retina in cone and rod cells. Rod cells are insensitive to colour and the cone cells are mainly responsible for our colour vision. However, in dim light the cone cells cannot function and we largely perceive the world in black and white. This also means we are dependent on rod cells to see in the dark. Since these cells are particularly insensitive at the red end of the visible spectrum, Washington asked: 'How might one enhance red light night-time vision?'

"It is possible that taking a chlorophyll derivative supplement could improve night vision"
- Ilyas Washington Prompted by research suggesting that deep-sea dragonfish see using chlorophyll, the scientists gave mice a chlorophyll derivative, chlorin e6, to see if their red vision was improved. Using a technique called electroretinography, which measures retinal cell responses to a flash of light, the researchers found that the treated mice showed almost double the response to red light when compared to non-treated mice. The group also showed that the chlorin e6 was localised in the retina and conclude that the increased visual sensitivity is a result of light absorption by the chlorophyll derivative.Washington is currently performing similar research in people. It is possible that taking a chlorophyll derivative supplement could improve night vision, he said.


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#2 kismet

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 06:43 PM

Unlikely that enough chlorophyll would get distributed to the eyes after oral intake. Other than the potential risks (we don't have a clue about acute, mid- or longterm effects), it's a nice find, very neat indeed. Although, (un)fortunately we have some of the best eyes out there, so I am not sure if rodent data is useful. Then again, our night vision ain't so good.

Edited by kismet, 07 September 2009 - 06:44 PM.

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#3 Super K

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 07:11 PM

Here's the relevant papers from pubmed.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17609771

Chlorophyll derivatives as visual pigments for super vision in the red.
Washington I, Zhou J, Jockusch S, Turro NJ, Nakanishi K, Sparrow JR.

Columbia University, Department of Chemistry, New York, NY 10027, USA. iw2101@columbia.edu

The primary event in vision is light-initiated activation of visual pigments. All visual pigments consist of the protein opsin bound to 11-cis-retinal and are responsible for initiating the transformation of light into an electrical signal. In a mouse model, we show that derivatives of chlorophyll can act as visual pigments initiating the transformation of light into an electrical signal and thus change the primary event in vision to initial activation of a chlorophyll derivative. Electroretinographic b-wave amplitudes recorded in response to red and blue light were two-fold greater in mice administered chlorin e(6), which accumulated in photoreceptor outer segments.


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/15303842

Porphyrins as photosensitizers to enhance night vision.
Washington I, Brooks C, Turro NJ, Nakanishi K.

Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA.

Relative bleaching rates of bovine rhodopsin (rod outer segments) in the presence and absence of seven porphyrins and methylene blue were measured under exposure to lambdamax = 675 nm light, using UV-vis spectroscopy. Rate enhancements on the order of up to three times compared to the bleaching of rhodopsin alone where observed. Fluorescence measurements and other data suggests that the porphyrins act as photosensitizers and excite the visual pigment via electron or triplet state energy transfer. These mechanisms suggest that rhodopsin possesses a pocket, proximal to the Schiff base so that porphyrins act as photosensitizers.


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#4 Lufega

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Posted 07 September 2009 - 09:48 PM

Would a product like this work, maybe diluted to a specific concentration???

http://www.herbsetc....loro_bro_07.pdf
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#5 INTENSE

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 09:25 PM

Would a product like this work, maybe diluted to a specific concentration???

http://www.herbsetc....loro_bro_07.pdf



yeah um no... It's a derivative of a specific type of chlorophyll.

You can get it here.

http://www.frontiers....php?FSIcat=Ce6
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#6 Super K

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 10:54 PM

You know what else might work ? Methylene Blue.

Many synthetic non-porphyrin compounds demonstrate photosensitising ability. These include: phenothiazinium compounds such as methylene blue ; Toluidine blue , which has found widespread use in the diagnosis of oral disease; cyanines such as Merocyanine 540; acridine dyes as demonstrated by Raab in 1900; derivatives of the tumour marker, Nile blue; and rhodamines such as the mitochondria-specific Rhodamine 123.


http://dspace.dial.p...ndividualPs.htm

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#7 Pablo M

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 11:08 PM

Bilberry is used for this purpose. In fact, RAF pilots used to eat bilberry jam before night missions. I've seen bilberry eyedrops somewhere but can't find them at the moment. bulk powders are also available (don't know if it's a good idea to put these in your eye, but ingesting them is fine).
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#8 Lufega

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 11:47 PM

You know what else might work ? Methylene Blue.


Tell me at what concentration per drop and I will totally put it in my eye.
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#9 caston

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 12:34 PM

Bilberry is used for this purpose. In fact, RAF pilots used to eat bilberry jam before night missions. I've seen bilberry eyedrops somewhere but can't find them at the moment. bulk powders are also available (don't know if it's a good idea to put these in your eye, but ingesting them is fine).


http://en.wikipedia...._medicinal_uses
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#10 torrential

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 03:33 PM

Bilberry is used for this purpose. In fact, RAF pilots used to eat bilberry jam before night missions. I've seen bilberry eyedrops somewhere but can't find them at the moment. bulk powders are also available (don't know if it's a good idea to put these in your eye, but ingesting them is fine).


http://en.wikipedia...._medicinal_uses


The legendary RAF story may be just that. From the third reference in the Wikipedia entry,

"In all my work on the RAF Bomber Command, I've never run across any reference to bilberry whatsoever"
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#11 caston

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 04:03 PM

I've been reading some articles that suggest the bilberry is better than blue berry (in both taste and health benefits) but much harder to grow and the yields per plant are very low. Sounds like a challenge to genetically manipulate the plant to produce more berries like its blue berry cousin.

Edited by caston, 25 December 2009 - 04:04 PM.

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#12 caston

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 02:15 PM

I just ordered 50 Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) seeds from ebay.

I'm gonna setup a greenhouse and try to get them to sprout.
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