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Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 OneScrewLoose

  • Location:California

Posted 04 February 2010 - 02:10 AM


Can I take these both at the same time at night on an empty stomach?
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#2 ajnast4r Re: Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?

  • Location:Sacramento, California

Posted 04 February 2010 - 04:56 AM

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#3 OneScrewLoose Re: Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?

  • Location:California

Posted 04 February 2010 - 01:01 PM

JESUS NO I HAVE A DISCRETE MATH TEST TOMORROW WHY R U DOING THIS TO ME!?!?!
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#4 Dorho Re: Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?

Posted 04 February 2010 - 01:44 PM

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At first glimpse that wheel looks extremely helpful, but is it complete? For example, doesn't calcium inhibit iron absorption?
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#5 stephen_b Re: Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?

Posted 04 February 2010 - 02:00 PM

Posted Image

At first glimpse that wheel looks extremely helpful, but is it complete? For example, doesn't calcium inhibit iron absorption?

Maybe Ca inhibits Zn which inhibits Fe?

Nevermind; Zn supplementation, not inhibition, would inhibit Fe. The chart is cool. I didn't know that P should be taken away from Mg and Zn.

Nice that lots of things inhibit iron. Maybe that means that we have proteins that bind to other things preferentially, and that they will bind to iron if those other minerals are not around.

Edited by stephen_b, 04 February 2010 - 02:55 PM.

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#6 zm3thod Re: Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?

  • Location:USA

Posted 04 February 2010 - 02:03 PM

JESUS NO I HAVE A DISCRETE MATH TEST TOMORROW WHY R U DOING THIS TO ME!?!?!


hahaha

nevermind, I'm equally confused

On magnesium:
"Zinc

High doses of zinc in supplemental form apparently interfere with the absorption of magnesium. One study reported that zinc supplements of 142 mg/day in healthy adult males significantly decreased magnesium absorption and disrupted magnesium balance (the difference between magnesium intake and magnesium loss) (2).
....
Vitamin D and calcium

The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) may slightly increase intestinal absorption of magnesium. However, magnesium absorption does not seem to be calcitriol-dependent as is the absorption of calcium and phosphate. High calcium intake has not been found to affect magnesium balance in most studies. Inadequate blood magnesium levels are known to result in low blood calcium levels, resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) action, and resistance to some of the effects of vitamin D (3, 4).""
http://lpi.oregonsta...rals/magnesium/"

Same site, on Zinc:
"Copper

Taking large quantities of zinc (50 mg/day or more) over a period of weeks can interfere with copper bioavailability. High intake of zinc induces the intestinal synthesis of a copper-binding protein called metallothionein. Metallothionein traps copper within intestinal cells and prevents its systemic absorption (see Copper). More typical intakes of zinc do not affect copper absorption and high copper intakes do not affect zinc absorption (5).

Iron

Supplemental (38-65 mg/day of elemental iron) but not dietary levels of iron may decrease zinc absorption (8). This interaction is of concern in the management of iron supplementation during pregnancy and lactation and has led some experts to recommend zinc supplementation for pregnant and lactating women taking more than 60 mg/day of elemental iron (9, 10).

Calcium

High levels of dietary calcium impair zinc absorption in animals, but it is uncertain whether this occurs in humans. One study showed that increasing the calcium intake of postmenopausal women by 890 mg/day in the form of milk or calcium phosphate (total calcium intake, 1,360 mg/day) reduced zinc absorption and zinc balance in postmenopausal women (11), but increasing the calcium intake of adolescent girls by 1,000 mg/day in the form of calcium citrate malate (total calcium intake, 1,667 mg/day) did not affect zinc absorption or balance (12). Calcium in combination with phytic acid reduces zinc absorption. This effect is particularly relevant to individuals who very frequently consume tortillas made with lime (i.e., calcium oxide). For more information on phytic acid, see Food sources.

Folic acid

The bioavailability of dietary folate is increased by the action of a zinc-dependent enzyme, suggesting a possible interaction between zinc and folic acid. In the past, some studies found low zinc intake decreased folate absorption, while other studies found folic acid supplementation impaired zinc utilization in individuals with marginal zinc status (4, 5). However, a more recent study reported that supplementation with a relatively high dose of folic acid (800 mcg/day) for 25 days did not alter zinc status in a group of students being fed low-zinc diets (3.5 mg/day); level of zinc intake did not impair folate utilization in this study (13).

Vitamin A
Zinc and vitamin A interact in several ways. Zinc is a component of retinol-binding protein, a protein necessary for transporting vitamin A in the blood. Zinc is also required for the enzyme that converts retinol (vitamin A) to retinal. This latter form of vitamin A is necessary for the synthesis of rhodopsin, a protein in the eye that absorbs light and thus is involved in dark adaptation. Zinc deficiency is associated with decreased release of vitamin A from the liver, which may contribute to symptoms of night blindness that are seen with zinc deficiency (14, 15)."
http://lpi.oregonsta.../minerals/zinc/

Edited by zm3thod, 04 February 2010 - 02:11 PM.

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#7 ajnast4r Re: Does magnesium compete with zinc for absorption?

  • Location:Sacramento, California

Posted 04 February 2010 - 03:37 PM

any amino acid or peptide chelated mineral should have significantly less antagonisms because they are absorbed through different pathways than in/organic salts.
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