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Supplements for Fatty Liver


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22 replies to this topic

#1 EastofEden

  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 19 May 2011 - 09:19 PM


Hello everyone.

My 50 y.o. dad is hoping to find supplements that will help him deal with a diagnosis of fatty liver (ultrasound confirmed).

Relevant information (From in-depth physical)completed Jul 2010:

BMI: 30 (Height: 5'7", Weight = 193 lbs, Waist Girth = 39 cm)
% Body Fat: 26%
BP: 120/80
Resting HR: 67

Cholesterol: 5.37
Triglycerides: 1.22
HDL: 1.06
LDL: 3.75
Total Cholesterol/HDL Ratio: 5.07
Glucose: 5.3
hsCRP: 4.26

Liver Profile
Bilirubin Total: 17.1
ALP: 74
ALT: 33
AST: 21
GGT: 27

Exercises with weights three times a week; cardio limited by knee issue
Fairly high stress
Minimal alcohol consumption
Not currently on any diets, doesn't eat particularly well, but thinks that supplements are a waste of time (generally) because we should be able to get everything we need from a well-balanced diet. I am slowly bringing him around, but I don't want to overwhelm him with pills.

This is what I was thinking so far:

Multi
Milk Thistle
Alpha Lipoic Acid
Niacin (1000 - 2000 mg/day)
Vitamin E (800 IU of d-alpha-tocopherol/day)
Omega 3


Metformin (would have to be prescribed) if there is no improvement on this regimen.

Any thoughts?
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#2 Lufega Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Miami, Fl.

Posted 19 May 2011 - 09:42 PM

Lecithin or any choline source.
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#3 leha Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:California

Posted 19 May 2011 - 11:08 PM

I agree with choline. Also fish oil, maybe chromium.

Reduce fat and protein intake (esp. animal foods).
Try rowing for aerobic.

For the knee, he can fix it with one of two techniques outlined by this guy.
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#4 FadingGlow Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:USA

Posted 20 May 2011 - 12:18 AM

Hasn't vitamin E supplementation been shown to decrease lifespan in any large (any common supplemental) amount according to current studies?
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#5 Hebbeh Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

Posted 20 May 2011 - 02:33 AM

http://www.scienceda...10419003651.htm

Limiting Carbs, Not Calories, Reduces Liver Fat Faster, Researchers Find

ScienceDaily (Apr. 19, 2011) — Curbing carbohydrates is more effective than cutting calories for individuals who want to quickly reduce the amount of fat in their liver, report UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers.

"What this study tells us is that if your doctor says that you need to reduce the amount of fat in your liver, you can do something within a month," said Dr. Jeffrey Browning, assistant professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and the study's lead author.

The results, available online and in an upcoming issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, could have implications for treating numerous diseases including diabetes, insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD. The disease, characterized by high levels of triglycerides in the liver, affects as many as one-third of American adults. It can lead to liver inflammation, cirrhosis and liver cancer.

For the study, researchers assigned 18 participants with NAFLD to eat either a low-carbohydrate or a low-calorie diet for 14 days.

The participants assigned to the low-carb diet limited their carbohydrate intake to less than 20 grams a day -- the equivalent of a small banana or a half-cup of egg noodles -- for the first seven days. For the final seven days, they switched to frozen meals prepared by UT Southwestern's Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC) kitchen that matched their individual food preferences, carbohydrate intake and energy needs.

Those assigned to the low-calorie diet continued their regular diet and kept a food diary for the four days preceding the study. The CTRC kitchen then used these individual records to prepare all meals during the 14-day study. Researchers limited the total number of calories to roughly 1,200 a day for the female participants and 1,500 a day for the males.

After two weeks, researchers used advanced imaging techniques to analyze the amount of liver fat in each individual. They found that the study participants on the low-carb diet lost more liver fat.

Although the study was not designed to determine which diet was more effective for losing weight, both the low-calorie dieters and the low-carbohydrate dieters lost an average of 10 pounds.

Dr. Browning cautioned that the findings do not explain why participants on the low-carb diet saw a greater reduction in liver fat, and that they should not be extrapolated beyond the two-week period of study.

"This is not a long-term study, and I don't think that low-carb diets are fundamentally better than low-fat ones," he said. "Our approach is likely to be only of short-term benefit because at some point the benefits of weight loss alone trounce any benefits derived from manipulating dietary macronutrients such as calories and carbohydrates.

"Weight loss, regardless of the mechanism, is currently the most effective way to reduce liver fat."

Other UT Southwestern researchers involved in the study were Dr. Shawn Burgess, senior author and assistant professor of pharmacology in the Advanced Imaging Research Center (AIRC); Dr. Jonathan Baker, assistant professor of pathology; Dr. Thomas Rogers, former professor of pathology; Jeannie Davis, clinical research coordinator in the AIRC; and Dr. Santhosh Satapati, postdoctoral researcher in the AIRC.

The National Institutes of Health supported the study.

http://www.scienceda...10413132940.htm

Aerobic Exercise May Improve Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

ScienceDaily (Apr. 13, 2011) — Walking on a treadmill for one hour a day may slow the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese people with prediabetes by jump-starting their metabolism and slowing the oxidative damage wrought by the condition, say researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. A study of 15 obese people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease revealed that the daily walks not only increase insulin sensitivity, but improve the liver's polyunsaturated lipid index (PUI), which is thought to be a marker of liver health.

The improvements are linked to an increase in the hormone adiponectin, said Jacob M. Haus, PhD, research fellow in the Department of Pathobiology at the Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute. Adiponectin influences the body's response to insulin and is associated with a reduced risk of heart attack because of its anti-inflammatory properties. But obese people often have low levels of adiponectin. Haus will discuss the team's findings at the Experimental Biology 2011 meeting (EB 2011), being held April 9-13, 2011 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC.

The Study

Participants in the study walked on a treadmill at 85% of their maximum heart rate for 1 hour per day for 7 consecutive days. Researchers measured the participants' body composition, respiration, insulin sensitivity, and PUIs before and after the 7-day program. The researchers also tested the participants' plasma glucose, insulin and adiponectin, and they gave the participants oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), which measure how quickly glucose is cleared from the blood. During the OGTTs, the researchers isolated mononuclear cells (blood cells that have a round nucleus) from the participants' blood to study whether these cells were producing molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS). High levels of ROS can result in oxidative damage to tissue.

"When people have prediabetes, their blood glucose will be high after an OGTT. We know that hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress, so we wanted to look at [the participants'] monocytes before and after the OGTT," says Dr. Haus. He notes that before the participants began the walking program, their ROS spiked after their OGTTs.

Cutting Metabolic Risks

At study's end, the participants' PUIs had increased an average of 84%. They also experienced increased insulin sensitivity, increased adiponectin and a decrease in the production of ROS, even after their OGTTs.

"We were able to correlate changes in adiponectin with PUI and the body's resting energy metabolism," says Dr. Haus. "The latter gives us an indication of whether carbohydrate or fat is being metabolized. After exercise, the participants were burning more fat."

Burning more fat is a positive reaction to exercise, one that can defend against oxidative damage and therefore the damage of fatty liver disease.

"Exercise appears to affect the cumulative metabolic risk factors for the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease," says Dr. Haus. "We like to think of exercise as medicine."
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#6 Jay Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:New York

Posted 20 May 2011 - 03:41 AM

Get enough choline and gelatin (for the glycine); Limit fructose and omega 6 oils.
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#7 stephen_b Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

Posted 20 May 2011 - 04:00 AM

Choline and lower the carbs. I believe cutting wheat will help.
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#8 david ellis Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:SanDiego

Posted 20 May 2011 - 03:34 PM

Hello everyone.

My 50 y.o. dad is hoping to find supplements that will help him deal with a diagnosis of fatty liver (ultrasound confirmed).

Relevant information (From in-depth physical)completed Jul 2010:

BMI: 30 (Height: 5'7", Weight = 193 lbs, Waist Girth = 39 cm)


I am perplexed by your dad's girth - Girth of 39 cm is 15 inches around the waist?

Here is a prior post about fatty liver. A medium chain triglyceride(a saturated fat) diet will shrink fatty livers. Maybe sillymarin will do something to.
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#9 david ellis Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:SanDiego

Posted 20 May 2011 - 03:47 PM

Here is another thread about fatty liver.
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#10 EastofEden Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 20 May 2011 - 09:49 PM


Hello everyone.

My 50 y.o. dad is hoping to find supplements that will help him deal with a diagnosis of fatty liver (ultrasound confirmed).

Relevant information (From in-depth physical)completed Jul 2010:

BMI: 30 (Height: 5'7", Weight = 193 lbs, Waist Girth = 39 cm)


I am perplexed by your dad's girth - Girth of 39 cm is 15 inches around the waist?

Here is a prior post about fatty liver. A medium chain triglyceride(a saturated fat) diet will shrink fatty livers. Maybe sillymarin will do something to.


Whoops! That should say 39 inches. I am used to metric.
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#11 EastofEden Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 20 May 2011 - 10:12 PM

Hasn't vitamin E supplementation been shown to decrease lifespan in any large (any common supplemental) amount according to current studies?


I had based the Vit E recommendation on the following paper, which used a dose of 800 IU/day:

Sanyal, A.J. et al. (2010). Pioglitazone, Vitamin E, or Placebo for Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis, NEJM, 362(18) 1675 - 1685


Background
Nonalcoholic steatohepat it is is a common liver disease t hat can progress to cirrho­
sis. Currently, there is no established treatment for this disease.

Methods
We randomly assigned 247 adults with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and without dia­
betes to receive pioglitazone at a dose of 30 mg daily (80 subjects), vitamin E at a
dose of 800 IU daily (84 subjects), or placebo (83 subjects), for 96 weeks. The pri­
mary outcome was an improvement in histologic features of nonalcoholic steato­
hepat it is, as assessed wit h t he use of a composite of st andardized scores for steat o­
sis, lobular inf lammation, hepatocellular ballooning, and fibrosis. Given the two
planned primary comparisons, P values of less than 0.025 were considered to indi­
cate statistical significance.

Results
Vitamin E therapy, as compared with placebo, was associated with a significantly
higher rate of improvement in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (43% vs. 19%, P=0.001),
but the difference in the rate of improvement with pioglitazone as compared with
placebo was not significant (34% and 19%, respectively; P=0.04). Serum alanine
and aspartate aminotransferase levels were reduced with vitamin E and with pio­
glitazone, as compared with placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons), and both
agents were associated with reductions in hepatic steatosis (P=0.005 for vitamin E
and P<0.001 for pioglitazone) and lobular inf lammation (P=0.02 for vitamin E and
P=0.004 for pioglitazone) but not with improvement in fibrosis scores (P=0.24 for
vitamin E and P=0.12 for pioglitazone). Subjects who received pioglitazone gained
more weight t han did t hose who received vit amin E or placebo; t he rat es of ot her side
effects were similar among the three groups.

Conclusions
Vitamin E was superior to placebo for t he t reat ment of nonalcoholic steatohepat it is
in adults without diabetes. There was no benefit of pioglitazone over placebo for
the primary outcome; however, significant benefits of pioglitazone were observed
for some of the secondary outcomes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00063622.
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#12 niner Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 20 May 2011 - 10:16 PM

doesn't eat particularly well, but thinks that supplements are a waste of time (generally) because we should be able to get everything we need from a well-balanced diet.

You have your work cut out for you... Your dad needs to cut the carbs, like everyone is saying. The metabolic dysfunction that his numbers are describing is caused mostly by a diet that is just wrong for him. He could get away with eating that way 30 years ago, but not today. His doctor is probably telling him to go "low fat", so you'll have to deprogram him on that point. He should take a sensible regimen of supplements (D3, K, fish oil, magnesium, multi), but that isn't going to be a magic bullet. If he just cuts out (or down on) grains (particularly wheat) and cuts out sugar, he'll probably be ok. He needs non-starchy vegetables, healthy fats, and meat. This is the basic Paleo diet. Good luck.
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#13 Hebbeh Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

Posted 26 May 2011 - 12:11 AM

http://www.scienceda...10525131703.htm

Lecithin Component May Reduce Fatty Liver, Improve Insulin Sensitivity

ScienceDaily (May 25, 2011) — A natural product called DLPC (dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine) increases sensitivity to insulin and reduces fatty liver in mice, leading Baylor College of Medicine researchers to believe it may provide a treatment for prediabetic patients. DLPC is an unusual phospholipid and a trace component of the dietary supplement lecithin.

Dr. David D. Moore, professor of molecular and cellular biology at BCM, and his colleagues at first thought that DLPC would provide a useful tool in studying the function of a receptor protein -- liver receptor homolog -1 or LRH-1 -- that regulates the production of bile acids in the liver.

Stimulating LRH-1 activity

Studies in mice soon showed that DLPC could stimulate LRH-1 activity. In addition to a small increase in bile acid levels, DLPC improved regulation of glucose and fat within the liver. A report on this work appears in the current issue of the journal Nature. Moore is collaborating with Dr. Lawrence Chan, director of the Diabetes and Endocrine Research Center at BCM, on a pilot study to find out how well DLPC works in patients with prediabetes.

"We know it works well in mice," said Moore. The link of LRH-1 to bile acids may contribute to its effect on glucose levels and fat because small, non-toxic increases in bile acid levels can improve metabolic disorders.

Dr. Jae Man Lee, then a graduate student in Moore's laboratory, first proposed screening compounds to see which activated LRH-1. He found that DLPC, a structurally unusual phosphatidylcholine (a form of phospholipid that is important in the formation of cell membranes) enhanced LRH-1 activity in cells.

In mice, DLPC induced the production of bile acid enzymes and lowered fat in the liver. It also increased levels of bile acids and regulated glucose or sugar circulating in the blood. In two kinds of mice that had resistance to insulin, DLPC also decreased fatty liver and lowered glucose levels in the blood. However, DLPC had no effect in mice that had no LRH-1 in the liver.

Effect on insulin resistant mice was striking

"Their overall body weight was not changed," said Moore. "But they had improved sensitivity to insulin (which helps keep glucose levels in check) and less fatty livers. We are interested in why it gets rid of the fat in the liver."

DLPC decreased the levels of proteins associated with formation of fatty acids and triglycerides, including a key regulator called SREBP-1c that encourages the deposition of fat in tissues.

"DLPC is a natural product," said Moore. "Lecithin is a mixture of many compounds but DLPC is one of them."

Clinical study underway

The ongoing clinical study, which involves people who are overweight but not diabetic, employs an approved form of DLPC that is used in liposomes, little globules of fat that take drugs into the body. An initial glucose tolerance test to determine how sensitive the people are to insulin at the start of the study is followed by another after the subjects take DLPC or a placebo for two months. Neither the patients in study nor the physicians know who is getting DLPC and who is getting the placebo.

Others who took part in the basic science research include Dr. Yoon Kwang Lee and Jennifer L. Mamrosh of BCM, Dr. Scott A. Busby and Dr. Patrick R. Griffin of Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida and Dr. Manish C. Pathak and Dr. Eric A. Ortlund of Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. (Yoon Kwang Lee is now at Northeastern Ohio Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy in Rootstown, Ohio).

Funding for this work came from the National Institutes of Health, the Alkek Foundation, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the Robert R.P. Doherty Jr. -- Welch Chair in Science.
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#14 1kgcoffee Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

Posted 26 May 2011 - 12:28 AM

Apple cider vinegar
http://www.life-enha...ate.asp?id=2292

pantethine
http://www.wellnessr...detoxification/
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#15 Sillewater Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Canada

Posted 26 May 2011 - 03:25 AM

http://www.scienceda...10525131703.htm

Lecithin Component May Reduce Fatty Liver, Improve Insulin Sensitivity

ScienceDaily (May 25, 2011) — A natural product called DLPC (dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine) increases sensitivity to insulin and reduces fatty liver in mice, leading Baylor College of Medicine researchers to believe it may provide a treatment for prediabetic patients. DLPC is an unusual phospholipid and a trace component of the dietary supplement lecithin.
.......


Interesting result. Masterjohn wrote a blog post on choline and fatty liver: http://blog.choleste...tribute-to.html. Lecithin is also a source of choline but they focused on a specific component, DPLC. It increased bile production (which I think would help absorb more fat), but I guess fat absorption is already pretty darn good. Also to note, that in the actual study they used DLPC, not actual lecithin.
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#16 Bonee Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Budapest

Posted 26 May 2011 - 04:34 PM

taurine may be a good option
it has been shown to reverse hepatic steatosis
and it is researched in various fatty liver diseases obv. mostly alcohol induced
http://www.springerl...467644l7738uw7/
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#17 Buzzing Health Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:UK

Posted 13 June 2011 - 10:23 PM

Apple cider is fantastic however be careful if your father has a sensitive gut it can damage it

Try true calm from Now Foods it contains Glycine Inostitol & Taurine

It is very mild and not in mega doses but it will heal the liver an awful lot

In the morning ask him to drink warm lime & Honey in water you will see an amazing difference in a few weeks

If his liver numbers are worrying you should ask him to detox via sauna and get rid of toxins the liver is unable to get rid of it will clear any brain fog etc

The liver will heal but will take time carbs will have to be eliminated right away it is very very important not to cut out fat you require the fat along with taurine to stimulate bile which will eliminate fat from his liver

Finally there is a remedy that many hundreds of thousands of people in India use called Liv.52 it will clear up the remaining problems
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#18 Logan Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Arlington, VA

Posted 14 June 2011 - 05:15 AM

Dietary conjugated linoleic acid
Curcumin
Milk Thistle
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#19 Spectre Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:USA
  • yes

Posted 15 June 2011 - 12:10 AM

taurine may be a good option
it has been shown to reverse hepatic steatosis
and it is researched in various fatty liver diseases obv. mostly alcohol induced
http://www.springerl...467644l7738uw7/


This.

Taurine is a must, I would take 10g a day of pure Taurine powder, stacked with N-Acetyl-Cysteine, SAMe/TMG, and Milk Thistle.
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#20 synesthesia Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:kalifornia

Posted 15 June 2011 - 01:25 AM

If pops isn't too keen on taking pills, this one supplement will do more for his fatty liver than any other...

PhosChol in America, and Essentiale Forte in the rest of the world are the only source of high DLPC (dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine) phospholipids. It is more commonly known as PPC (polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine) or "polyenylphosphatidylcholine", AKA essential phospholipids or EPL.

Regular lecithin has some DLPC, but you'd need to take a lot of it for a therapeutic effect.

Look here: http://www.phoschol.com/

Here: http://www.lef.org/m...r00-report.html

And/or here: http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Essentiale

Edited by synesthesia, 15 June 2011 - 01:37 AM.

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#21 manic_racetam Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:USA

Posted 19 June 2011 - 07:12 AM

I never had ultrasound done but I'm pretty sure that years of binge drinking caused a bit of fatty liver for me. I started inositol/choline supplementation and stopped drinking. That along with regular exercise has brought my BMI from 28 down to 23 and I haven't changed my diet at all. I'm guessing the change in body composition has to do with my liver processing fat better. This is totally anecdotal and the weight change may just be due to less calories from huge amounts of alcohol everyday and an increase in exercise.

I use 250mg inositol and 250mg choline 4 times a day.
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#22 youandme Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

Posted 19 June 2011 - 12:45 PM

Carnitine:


Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jun;105(6):1338-45. Epub 2010 Jan 12.


L-carnitine supplementation to diet: a new tool in treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis--a randomized and controlled clinical trial.

RESULTS:At the end of the study, L-carnitine-treated patients showed significant improvements in the following parameters: aspartate aminotransferase (P=0.000), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (P=0.000), gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (gamma-GT) (P=0.000), total cholesterol (P=0.000), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (P=0.000), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (P=0.000), triglycerides (P=0.000), glucose (P=0.000), HOMA-IR (P=0.000), CRP (P=0.000), TNF-alpha (P=0.000), and histological scores (P=0.000).


CONCLUSIONS:
L-carnitine supplementation to diet is useful for reducing TNF-alpha and CRP, and for improving liver function, glucose plasma level, lipid profile, HOMA-IR, and histological manifestations of NASH.

PMID: 20068559



Edited by youandme, 19 June 2011 - 12:51 PM.

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#23 EastofEden Re: Supplements for Fatty Liver

  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 11 July 2011 - 04:13 PM

Thanks to everyone who posted with supplement and diet suggestions! My dad ended up being persuaded to do this ridiculous cleanse thing by his chiropractor, but the upside of this is that now he is more receptive to the idea of taking pills.

Although this isn't directly related to the fatty liver, I thought I should report that a combination of Green Tea and Cayenne Pepper just before each meal was very successful at reducing his appetite. Where he used to always go for seconds, eat huge portions and snack while watching TV, he now eats small portions of healthy foods and has drastically cut down his snacking.

He also found it easier to cut calories by making one meal a protein-type shake.

So, for those trying to lose weight to address a liver issue, my dad is n=1 for the idea that Capsaicin and Green Tea are effective at reducing appetite.
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