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Best Aging Explanation Yet

aging theory

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#1 eighthman

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 03:19 AM


The article is entitled "Mitochondrial DNA and Animal Longevity: Insights From Comparative Studies"

I realize this is my subjective judgement but I think this article is more clear, logical and discerning in its developed correlations than anything else I've read. It is consistent with studies done on ageless animals.

Simply put, it nails it down.....

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  • Attached File  Mdna.pdf   1.07MB   130 downloads

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#2 johnross47

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 07:30 PM

As a non scientist I was surprised at how readable this article is. If I've understood it, it seems to be strong support for CR and puts forward a plausible mechanism to explain the CR effect. Is that correct?
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#3 eighthman

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 12:42 AM

I appreciate the fact that it explains various mysteries such as why antioxidants don't do much or why birds live longer than rodents despite a higher metabolism.

I think it makes much more sense to examine ageless animals to find out their secrets than looking at centenarian genes. Why hit a single when you might knock one out of the park?
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#4 eighthman

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 12:46 AM

Oops..... and yes, the final part defends caloric restriction in terms of avoiding mtDNA damage.
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#5 johnross47

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 07:07 PM

wonder why this thread disappeared without trace

Edited by johnross47, 25 March 2012 - 07:07 PM.

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#6 Mind

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 12:57 PM

wonder why this thread disappeared without trace


Probably because it doesn't elucidate a method of rejuvenation. That is the next step. We already know that CR has many positive health effects, ageless animals have been discussed in other threads, and it is suspected that mtDNA mutations and ROS are a key part of aging. What would drive more discussion is a novel idea of how to stop this aspect of aging and rejuvenate the body/cells, such as this one.
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#7 johnross47

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 05:57 PM

thanks for the links. I'm glad I asked.
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#8 steampoweredgod

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 05:32 PM


wonder why this thread disappeared without trace


Probably because it doesn't elucidate a method of rejuvenation. That is the next step. We already know that CR has many positive health effects, ageless animals have been discussed in other threads, and it is suspected that mtDNA mutations and ROS are a key part of aging. What would drive more discussion is a novel idea of how to stop this aspect of aging and rejuvenate the body/cells, such as this one.


Some interesting controversial research has suggested oogenesis may continue into adulthood, so a mechanism must exist if this is true for mitochondria populations that have experienced decades of life to be rejuvenated such that at least a portion of new born childs ends perfectly healthy.
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#9 Mind

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:20 PM



wonder why this thread disappeared without trace


Probably because it doesn't elucidate a method of rejuvenation. That is the next step. We already know that CR has many positive health effects, ageless animals have been discussed in other threads, and it is suspected that mtDNA mutations and ROS are a key part of aging. What would drive more discussion is a novel idea of how to stop this aspect of aging and rejuvenate the body/cells, such as this one.


Some interesting controversial research has suggested oogenesis may continue into adulthood, so a mechanism must exist if this is true for mitochondria populations that have experienced decades of life to be rejuvenated such that at least a portion of new born childs ends perfectly healthy.


Are there any labs in the world pursuing this line of research - resetting the health/functioning of mitos? Or is SENS the only one working on rejuvenation/protection of mitos
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#10 steampoweredgod

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:17 AM




wonder why this thread disappeared without trace


Probably because it doesn't elucidate a method of rejuvenation. That is the next step. We already know that CR has many positive health effects, ageless animals have been discussed in other threads, and it is suspected that mtDNA mutations and ROS are a key part of aging. What would drive more discussion is a novel idea of how to stop this aspect of aging and rejuvenate the body/cells, such as this one.


Some interesting controversial research has suggested oogenesis may continue into adulthood, so a mechanism must exist if this is true for mitochondria populations that have experienced decades of life to be rejuvenated such that at least a portion of new born childs ends perfectly healthy.


Are there any labs in the world pursuing this line of research - resetting the health/functioning of mitos? Or is SENS the only one working on rejuvenation/protection of mitos

I've not checked into it, as the news feeds I get are quite large and varied, with that and all the backlog of books and research papers, I'm accumulating material faster than I can research it.

Hopefully another member passes by and sheds some light

here's a link to the oogenesis research

For the first time, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have isolated egg-producing stem cells from the ovaries of reproductive age women and shown these cells can produce what appear to be normal egg cells or oocytes. In the March issue of Nature Medicine, the team from the Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology at MGH reports the latest follow-up study to their now-landmark 2004 Nature paper that first suggested female mammals continue producing egg cells into adulthood.-sciencedaily


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#11 mikeb80

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:41 AM

Thanks to the original poster (Eightman) for sharing the interesting article!
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