Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Resveratrol Analogue: Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, a plant-derived cognitive enhancer

tetrahydroxystilbene glucosid

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 revenant

  • Registered User
  • 298 posts
  • 96
  • Location:St Louis, Missouri
  • no

Posted 05 April 2012 - 02:32 AM


I am ever suprised by this apparent panacea. If taken, know that He Shou Wu is a know MAOi. Also though very rare, there have been cases of reported hepatotoxicity.

I wish someone would isolate or synthesixe 2354 Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside and sell it to me. Until then I will keep boiling the roots.

http://www.bioportfo...Plasticity.html

Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, a plant-derived cognitive enhancer, promotes hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

Home » Latest PubMed Articles » European journal of pharmacology » Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, a plant-derived cognitive enhanc...
Summary

Plant or food derived polyphenols have received a great deal of attention due to their biological properties including anti-oxidative effects, neuroprotection and memory enhancement. Here, we investigated the roles of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside (TSG), an active component of the rhizome extracted from Polygonum multiflorum, in the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in normal mice as well as the underlying mechanisms. It was shown that TSG promoted the differentiation of PC12 cells and increased the intracellular calcium level in hippocampal neurons. TSG facilitated high-frequency stimulation (HFS)-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in a bell-shaped manner. The facilitation of LTP induction by TSG required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSG promotes LTP induction and this effect may contribute to the enhancement of learning and memory seen in animal models.
Affiliation

Department of Pharmacology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and technology, Wuhan, 430030, China.


  • like x 1

#2 redan

  • Member
  • 1,761 posts
  • -16
  • Location:.
  • no

Posted 05 April 2012 - 02:57 AM

I think, you're going to be doing a lot of boiling.

sponsored ad

  • Advert

#3 revenant

  • Registered User
  • 298 posts
  • 96
  • Location:St Louis, Missouri
  • no

Posted 05 April 2012 - 03:20 AM

I think, you're going to be doing a lot of boiling.


I've been boiling he shou wu with reishi for years now, so yeah, lots of boiling. I prepare a week's supply at a time... 4oz he shou wu and 2oz rieshi yield about 4 liters of strong decoction.

#4 redan

  • Member
  • 1,761 posts
  • -16
  • Location:.
  • no

Posted 05 April 2012 - 03:30 AM


I think, you're going to be doing a lot of boiling.


I've been boiling he shou wu with reishi for years now, so yeah, lots of boiling. I prepare a week's supply at a time... 4oz he shou wu and 2oz rieshi yield about 4 liters of strong decoction.

So, what is the dosage and ratio of Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside in the plant? Have you noticed any effects so far? It's also in reishi?

Edited by redan, 05 April 2012 - 03:31 AM.


#5 revenant

  • Registered User
  • 298 posts
  • 96
  • Location:St Louis, Missouri
  • no

Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:28 AM

I'm shooting from the hip on my dosage. The only data I have to go on thus far is the amount of resveratrol in Polygonum cuspidatum -which is quite high ~ .5mg/g for a potent ratio. Being that the two roots are close cousins, and the chemicals are identicle except for one OH group, I'm banking the content and dosage are similar. If the two are indeed similar, I may be consuming as much as 8mg of 2354 tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside per day. As far as results, I take lots of compounds, so I can't attribute anything in particular to this one. I can say that I actually feel a little tonic effect after drinking the stuff, it relaxes me.

Please, if anyone can find data on tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside content in Polygonum multiflorum I would love to see it posted.

Reishi is different. It has many qualities that impart good health. One reason I take it is because it activates the UTH1 gene, which interacts with methionine sulfoxide reductase B in the mitochondria. I believe it may help turn methionine sulfoxide back into methionine, as does gensingoside Rg3, but through a different pathway. Reishi is known to activate DAF-16/DAF-2 also. http://www.sciencedi...96808960900844X

Edited by revenant, 05 April 2012 - 04:59 AM.


#6 redan

  • Member
  • 1,761 posts
  • -16
  • Location:.
  • no

Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:34 AM

I'm just in it for the memory enhancing properties. 32 mg would be like... 64 grams of that stuff??

Someone tell me some herb for great memory. Thanks.

Edited by redan, 05 April 2012 - 04:35 AM.


#7 8bitmore

  • Registered User
  • 302 posts
  • 100

Posted 07 April 2012 - 11:38 AM

Just want to add that He Shou Wu is also known as Fo Ti. Fo Ti is traditionally prepared/cured with black beans to increase the potency and digestibility of the compound. I've been taking an organic, b.b.cured, source on and off for a couple of years: I strongly feel that it needs cycling due to its potency. Personally this means that I take it for about 1.5 months during the summer as a tonic (a 4th of a teaspoonful of the powder in hot, not boiling, water as a tea). My two added cents: there's ultimately so much bio-individuality going on that I feel the most important thing when dappling with these compounds is to develop sensitivity towards their effects on the body to the extend possible..!

sponsored ad

  • Advert

#8 arcticjoe

  • Registered User
  • 99 posts
  • 0

Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:03 PM

Some more recent research on this interesting compound, looks very interesting:





Novel Herbal Compound Offers Potential to Prevent and Treat Alzheimer's Disease


Feb. 15, 2013 — Administration of the active compound tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG) derived from the Chinese herbal medicine Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, reversed both overexpression of α-synuclein, a small protein found in the brain, and its accumulation using a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. These results, which may shed light on the neuropathology of AD and open up new avenues of treatment, are available in the current issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience.

Aberrant accumulation of α-synuclein can form insoluble aggregates that have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Researchers have now found that overexpression of α-synuclein increases with age and have demonstrated that α-synuclein aggregates in the hippocampus of older mice compared to normal controls.
"Our results raise the possibility that TSG might be a novel compound for the treatment of AD and dementia with Lewy body," says co-lead investigator Lan Zhang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases of Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmacology of Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University in Beijing.
The study used an animal model of AD: APPV717I transgenic (Tg) mice with the London mutation. In previous work, the authors showed that these mice show cognitive impairments beginning at 4 months of age and develop amyloid plaques in the brain that are evident by 10 months.
In one series of experiments, 4 month old Tg mice were divided into 3 groups and received daily intragastric administration of distilled water (controls), low dose TSG (120 µmol/kg/d), or high dose TSG (240 µmol/kg/d). A fourth group consisted of age-matched non-Tg controls. The mice were treated until 10 months of age. In a second series of experiments, 10-month-old mice were divided into similar control and TSG-treated groups and were treated for 6 months.
The authors used a variety of techniques to hone in on what was happening in the brains of the Tg mice compared to age-matched controls: cDNA microarray analysis, reverse transcription PCR, western blotting, and immunochemistry. They found that α-synuclein messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels increase in a time-dependent manner in the hippocampus of Tg mice between ages 4 and 16 months and α-synuclein aggregation was noticeable at 16 months. Age-related increases in α-synuclein were also seen in the control mice but to a lesser degree.
"We suggest that, besides increased Aβ (beta-amyloid) and amyloid plaques, overexpression and aggregation of α-synuclein in the hippocampus might partially account for cognitive impairment in this Tg mouse model of AD," comments co-lead investigator Lin Li, MD, PhD, Professor and Director, Department of Pharmacology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University in Beijing. She adds that "α-synuclein overexpression occurs even in the early phase of AD and may accelerate Aβ production and deposition, which further facilitates α-synuclein overexpression and accumulation."
Analysis of the TSG-treated groups showed that TSG-treatment from the age of 4 to 10 months significantly downregulated α-synuclein mRNA and protein overexpression in the hippocampus of the Tg mice, and the effect was stronger at the higher dose. This suggests that TSG may have a role in preventing the neurotoxic effects of α-synuclein on synaptic function and cell activity. In addition, the finding that Tg reduced α-synuclein overexpression in older animals (>10 months) may indicate that it has therapeutic potential even after neuropathologic changes have occurred.
In previous work, the authors found that TSG acts as a "cognitive enhancer" to improve learning and memory in both APP transgenic mice and aged rats. The authors emphasize that while it is not completely clear how TSG works, their findings open up a new area of research. "The role of α-synuclein, especially in the early phase of AD, and its interaction with Aβ should be considered when developing new therapeutic strategies to target AD pathogenesis," says Dr. Zhang.





http://www.scienceda...30217085301.htm

Edited by arcticjoe, 19 February 2013 - 09:03 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users