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Why do I feel so tired after eating?

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#1 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 02:16 PM


I don't know if anyone else experiences this, but I get very, very fatigued after I eat a regular sized meal. I have a very fast metabolism, and I am a very skinny 22 year old guy.
When I eat stuff like vegetables, fruits, and meat this doesn't happen so badly - but when I eat a cheeseburger/fries, or biscuits and gravy for breakfast, or anything other than veggies/fruits/meats/nuts, within 15 minutes I will feel so fatigued I almost have to lay down and take a nap. This started happening to me daily about 2 years ago and hasn't gotten any better. I do not consume caffeine or any other stimulants (although I was a horrible caffine addict for most of my 22 years, but I quit totally about 7 or 8 months ago), or take any medications or nootropics. I do go to the gym.
Also, I have a weight gainer supplement called Monster Mass which has a ton of protein, calories, and amino acids. When I take the recommended amount of that, I get extremely fatigued also. I noticed when I eat very very small meals or skip several meals in a row I become more awake and alert. But I'm extremely hungry. (Yes, I have taken stuff to rid myself of parasites, etc., so leave that part out, haha)

Basically, I have somewhat figured out how to overcome the fatigue: don't eat or eat very little. But I don't want to do that because I am trying to gain weight. Maybe I will have to choose one or another.

My question: Does anyone know anything about why this happens, how to remedy/combat it, or am I stuck this way? Also, are there any mild stimulants that can be used to overcome this other than caffeine? I don't want to go back on caffeine because of blood flow issues to the brain. Just doesn't seem healthy. I also notice I have very low impulse control along with this problem. It's almost like I was self-treating myself for ADD my entire life via caffeine.

Thanks everyone!!

#2 BLimitless

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 02:57 PM

It's a good question. Try supplementing with digestive enzymes or digestive bitters.

For what it's worth I have a similar issue so I just do intermittent fasting and plan my big meals around times when I can just zone out or sleep.



Also, just switch to vegetable heavy diet in any case, it's a hell of a lot better for people like us.

I get the feeling this might in part be caused by an allergenic response, and a lack of minerals and even when that is fixed, a lack of correct mineral absorption. I noticed that when I was fully absorbing minerals for a certain period of time, this problem dissipated.


Possible reasons:

Wheat/gluten/dairy allergy or similar allergies => immediate sedative inflammatory response
Phytic acid and other antinutrients suck away crucial vitamins/minerals => vitamins/nutrients depleted puts the brain in heavy nutrient debt for a while so brain shuts down non-essential processes
Omega 3 intake very low => Huge dose of omega-6 fats creates inflammatory response


There are of course many many more but these are the ones I have noticed directly in myself.

Edited by BLimitless, 05 January 2013 - 03:01 PM.

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#3 Raphy

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 03:22 PM

Hi Xeon,

Avoid wheat and wheat by-product. That means avoid bread, pasta, burgers,... Avoid all that can contains gluten. Limit carbs (potatoes and rice can be ok, fruits too, but no soda, bread,cakes,...). Low carb is good.
Eat a good amount of meats (fat is good) and vegetables, and trust me you won't feel tired like that.

In other words, try a primal diet, you won't regret it. Your symptoms are typical of gluten and sugar effects on the body. And contrary to what we are told, we don't need carbs in our regular alimentation, and a lot of people doesn't do well on gluten andwheat by-products.

Just try it you'll see :)

Possible reasons:

Wheat/gluten/dairy allergy or similar allergies => immediate sedative inflammatory response
Phytic acid and other antinutrients suck away crucial vitamins/minerals => vitamins/nutrients depleted puts the brain in heavy nutrient debt for a while so brain shuts down non-essential processes
Omega 3 intake very low => Huge dose of omega-6 fats creates inflammatory response


There are of course many many more but these are the ones I have noticed directly in myself.




That :)

Edited by Raphy, 05 January 2013 - 03:24 PM.

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#4 Heh

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:41 PM

You need to stabilize your blood sugar (Resveratrol, ALCAR) and possibly supplement with probiotics (Jarro-Dophilus or Dr. Ohirra's are good) prior to eating. B-Vitamins also help with digestion. You'd take Resveratrol, and B-Vitamins with the meal, and the rest 1 hour prior to it.

If you don't get tired while (vegetable) juice fasting, then maybe you are just someone that has to consume more vegetables, and less meat and carbs.

...heh, do you experience symptoms of diabetes?

Edited by Joel, 05 January 2013 - 04:43 PM.

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#5 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:12 PM

BLimitless: Thanks!!! I am going to take this advice and cut out wheat/gluten/dairy the next few days and see how that goes. Is there any specific way I can get tested to see if that is my problem? Also, can you develop these kinds of allergies if you have previously never had any?

Raphy: How can I gain weight if I don't consume lots of carbs? Don't most of our calories come from carbs?

Joel: I have a vitamin called Opti-Men that has Resveratrol in it. You can look up that vitamin and tell me if its decent if you'd like. I do have some symptoms of diabetes, but they seem to only happen when I consume a large amount of sugar at once, like eating cake or candy. I drink Sprite a lot and that never really affects me but I plan on eliminating that also.

Another question: Should taking NSAIDS like Ibuprofen reduce inflammation and kill the sedating effects of the allergies? And can I combine that vitamin with Ibuprofen considering all the herbal ingredients?

#6 Megatrone

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:14 PM

Fat contains 9 calories per gram, and carbs contain 4 calories per gram. Eat healthy fats.

Edited by Megatrone, 05 January 2013 - 05:15 PM.

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#7 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:18 PM

Fat contains 9 calories per gram, and carbs contain 4 calories per gram. Eat healthy fats.


Gotcha.

#8 BLimitless

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:22 PM

Taking NSAIDS to reduce inflammation while eating allergens/bad food is like pissing into a fire. Doesn't really solve the problem. Your house is still burning down to the ground. Ibuprofen is not an essential nutrient.


Yes you can test yourself to see if it's your problem through many ways.

There are almost definitely some rigorous tests that would probably involve blood or urine or stools or whatever but there's something that needs much less clout: do an elimination diet.


Fast for two weeks, eating only vegetables & fruit. Then sometime after the first week, when you feel crystal clear and ready, add in fish. Then add in meats and so on (paleo-style food). Find the foundation diet that makes you feel 100% fine. Not 90%, 100%.

Now add grains, milk, nuts, legumes, processed foods last; and for each of these, do them one at a time. Don't drink milk AND eat grains, just drink milk. Then stop drinking the milk, add the grains. Stop the grains, add the nuts. Etc. Then you will find what it is causing your issues. It could be multiple things.


The blood sugar thing is also very important. I can't believe I overlooked that, it's actually the #1 cause of post-meal tiredness. Stabilise that and the majority of tiredness will dissipate.


We tend to see people with allergies display extreme visible symptoms. Someone might get stung by a bee and suddenly they're on the floor spasming near death. Or they might eat a peanut and again need to go to the hospital. But what we don't notice are the huge number of cases where these allergies are strong, but not strong enough to cause an acute & visible problem.

So they will not say anything out loud, and you won't even be able to really tell unless you are that superbly discerning. The person just accepts it as a fact of life that feeling like crap is what happens sometimes. But this is unconscious eating. Unconscious eating will destroy any hopes of living a long stress & disease free life.

Edited by BLimitless, 05 January 2013 - 05:26 PM.


#9 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:37 PM

BLimitless: You're a genius, my friend. I am definitely going to do this. Starting now. I don't think my blood sugar is a huge problem but I'm not sure what causes all the symptoms I have. For example, when I wake up I feel fine, awake, alert, etc. Then I eat a meal and get really sedated and groggy.. also, my eyes get really tired and I get black circles under them. Kind of like when you haven't had sleep in a very long time. But it happens immediately alongside the fatigue, and all that. It's like I have the opposite of flushing. Face becomes pale and looks like I have no blood under my skin or something. Taking my Opti-Men vitamin does not completely alleviate the grogginess, but it makes the circles under my eyes and "tired face" feeling go away immediately after taking it. I've been having all of these symptoms for about 2 years, trying to figure it out, and I'm just now finding out it could be allergies. Wow. Better late than never! :cool:

#10 renfr

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:43 PM

I have the exact same problem ONLY when I put cholinergics into my diet (phosphatidylcholine or choline bitartrate).
Last week I didn't take any cholinergics at all and the problem was gone, this week I just started taking choline again and here it goes again, sleeping right after a meal all the time.
To me, it has something to do with a serotonin overload after a meal which makes you drowsy. Carbs contains a lot of tryptophan.
The solution is definitely to eat less in one meal to avoid sugar spikes and eat less carbs and replace them with healthier food.
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#11 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:50 PM

I have the exact same problem ONLY when I put cholinergics into my diet (phosphatidylcholine or choline bitartrate).
Last week I didn't take any cholinergics at all and the problem was gone, this week I just started taking choline again and here it goes again, sleeping right after a meal all the time.
To me, it has something to do with a serotonin overload after a meal which makes you drowsy. Carbs contains a lot of tryptophan.
The solution is definitely to eat less in one meal to avoid sugar spikes and eat less carbs and replace them with healthier food.


Are you serious? I literally just ordered this Country Life Choline yesterday because I thought it could help my poor short term memory... was this a mistake?

#12 Heh

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 06:25 PM

BLimitless: Thanks!!! I am going to take this advice and cut out wheat/gluten/dairy the next few days and see how that goes. Is there any specific way I can get tested to see if that is my problem? Also, can you develop these kinds of allergies if you have previously never had any?

Raphy: How can I gain weight if I don't consume lots of carbs? Don't most of our calories come from carbs?

Joel: I have a vitamin called Opti-Men that has Resveratrol in it. You can look up that vitamin and tell me if its decent if you'd like. I do have some symptoms of diabetes, but they seem to only happen when I consume a large amount of sugar at once, like eating cake or candy. I drink Sprite a lot and that never really affects me but I plan on eliminating that also.

Another question: Should taking NSAIDS like Ibuprofen reduce inflammation and kill the sedating effects of the allergies? And can I combine that vitamin with Ibuprofen considering all the herbal ingredients?

How much Resveratrol does it have in it? I looked it up online and didn't see Resveratrol on the label. Either way, 250-500mg of the 98-99% purity Resveratrol is a good amount. If that's too expensive, then don't bother. The popular multi on this site seems to be Ortho-Core, which is also what I take.

As for bulking up, it's more about getting enough protein (1g per pound of lean mass [weight - bodyfat]), the number (and quality) of calories, and the ratio of fats, proteins, and carbs. An easy ratio is 40% carbs, 30% fats, 30% protein.

Edited by Joel, 05 January 2013 - 06:50 PM.


#13 renfr

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 06:27 PM


I have the exact same problem ONLY when I put cholinergics into my diet (phosphatidylcholine or choline bitartrate).
Last week I didn't take any cholinergics at all and the problem was gone, this week I just started taking choline again and here it goes again, sleeping right after a meal all the time.
To me, it has something to do with a serotonin overload after a meal which makes you drowsy. Carbs contains a lot of tryptophan.
The solution is definitely to eat less in one meal to avoid sugar spikes and eat less carbs and replace them with healthier food.


Are you serious? I literally just ordered this Country Life Choline yesterday because I thought it could help my poor short term memory... was this a mistake?

What do you mean short term memory? You start talking to someone about something and then some seconds or minutes after you have a hard time remembering what you were talking about or details of the discussion?
Short term memory loss can definitely cured with choline intake.
Inositol can also significantly solve short term memory issues due to serotonin depletion. (it desensitizes serotonin receptors)
I don't know if choline will exacerbate your symptoms, maybe I'm a special case.

#14 BLimitless

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 06:32 PM

Yeah Xeon I have the exact same issue even with the eyes and stuff. Now I make a huge green smoothie packed with all sorts of things and I have not experienced this for a year at least. Go through my post history and you'll get more info, it'll take too long to type it up as I have spread the info over many posts.

This is a problem that makes you feel absolutely hopeless, lost and nobody really seems to know what causes it. But in actuality it's like the easiest snappiest fix and once it's gone you're never going back!

It's actually a very common thing in the modern Western world, and people tend to just accept it as part and parcel of living. What switched me on is finding out about celiac disease (intense gluten allergy), then finding out that gluten sensitivity is a whole different ballgame to celiac, the latter being just a subset of a global pandemic.

Edited by BLimitless, 05 January 2013 - 06:37 PM.


#15 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 07:17 PM

Joel: Maybe I was mistaken about it having Resveratrol. I could have sworn it was listed on the ingredients but I guess not, haha. I did read somewhere that Resveratrol is an MAOI though. Is that correct?

renfr: Yes, that is precisely my problem. Just a couple years ago, I could read an article and be able to repeat it back word for word almost. Now I have a hard time encoding it into my memory for some reason. And I don't do any drugs. Another example would be that I can't maintain a train of thought during conversation. I tend to veer off topic many times due to lack of concentration AND I simply forget what I was saying. And then I don't remember everything about the discussion, and have to go back and ask. And I always forget where I put things. I mean, I'm only 22 years old and I previously considered myself far more intelligent than most of my friends and I definitely had a better memory. Can you tell me more about Inositol, and how it affects memory?

BLimitless: Definitely a huge thank you for the wheat/dairy/gluten allergy info. As a matter of fact I actually have been looking into green smoothies. And yeah, screw accepting feeling horrible after meals and all that. I want to be on top of my game all the time (and naturally) unless I'm asleep or dead!


So far the plan of action is this:
  • Eliminate wheat/gluten/dairy from my diet completely, and then test things one at a time to see if I can figure out the exact allergy if I have one or more
  • Only consume vegetables and fruits
  • Add probiotics and digestive enzymes to my diet
  • Consider Resveratrol / Inositol / Choline
  • Continue taking multivitamin
Are there any supplements that can reduce inflammation in the brain? And do meats contain allergens like gluten? You guys are awesome for helping me out with this.

#16 Nootropix

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 07:35 PM



I have the exact same problem ONLY when I put cholinergics into my diet (phosphatidylcholine or choline bitartrate).
Last week I didn't take any cholinergics at all and the problem was gone, this week I just started taking choline again and here it goes again, sleeping right after a meal all the time.
To me, it has something to do with a serotonin overload after a meal which makes you drowsy. Carbs contains a lot of tryptophan.
The solution is definitely to eat less in one meal to avoid sugar spikes and eat less carbs and replace them with healthier food.


Are you serious? I literally just ordered this Country Life Choline yesterday because I thought it could help my poor short term memory... was this a mistake?

What do you mean short term memory? You start talking to someone about something and then some seconds or minutes after you have a hard time remembering what you were talking about or details of the discussion?
Short term memory loss can definitely cured with choline intake.
Inositol can also significantly solve short term memory issues due to serotonin depletion. (it desensitizes serotonin receptors)
I don't know if choline will exacerbate your symptoms, maybe I'm a special case.



Your post always useful and plain simple ,i will read more research about Inositol to desensitizes serotonin receptors

but lastime i tried give me panic attack

#17 renfr

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:44 PM

Joel: Maybe I was mistaken about it having Resveratrol. I could have sworn it was listed on the ingredients but I guess not, haha. I did read somewhere that Resveratrol is an MAOI though. Is that correct?

renfr: Yes, that is precisely my problem. Just a couple years ago, I could read an article and be able to repeat it back word for word almost. Now I have a hard time encoding it into my memory for some reason. And I don't do any drugs. Another example would be that I can't maintain a train of thought during conversation. I tend to veer off topic many times due to lack of concentration AND I simply forget what I was saying. And then I don't remember everything about the discussion, and have to go back and ask. And I always forget where I put things. I mean, I'm only 22 years old and I previously considered myself far more intelligent than most of my friends and I definitely had a better memory. Can you tell me more about Inositol, and how it affects memory?

BLimitless: Definitely a huge thank you for the wheat/dairy/gluten allergy info. As a matter of fact I actually have been looking into green smoothies. And yeah, screw accepting feeling horrible after meals and all that. I want to be on top of my game all the time (and naturally) unless I'm asleep or dead!


So far the plan of action is this:

  • Eliminate wheat/gluten/dairy from my diet completely, and then test things one at a time to see if I can figure out the exact allergy if I have one or more
  • Only consume vegetables and fruits
  • Add probiotics and digestive enzymes to my diet
  • Consider Resveratrol / Inositol / Choline
  • Continue taking multivitamin
Are there any supplements that can reduce inflammation in the brain? And do meats contain allergens like gluten? You guys are awesome for helping me out with this.

Well I guess choline can be good for you as it increases focus and concentration, you might be choline deficient (it's a vitamin B).
Visual memory and recall where you put your keys or other stuff is indeed proportional with acetylcholine concentrations.
Inositol is complementary with choline in the sense it helps formation of phospholipids (which are 30% of your brain) that helps with memory formation but also with protection from inflammation (choline enhances myelin production which protects your neurons from oxidation).
Inositol is involved in biological processes such as nerver guidance, modulation of serotonin activity, modulation of intracellular calcium, gene expression and breakdown of fats.
However you should start with low doses, too much of it (choline and inositol) can cause depression (due to inhibition of other neurotransmitters) but if you take the right dose for you it will definitely enhance memory.




I have the exact same problem ONLY when I put cholinergics into my diet (phosphatidylcholine or choline bitartrate).
Last week I didn't take any cholinergics at all and the problem was gone, this week I just started taking choline again and here it goes again, sleeping right after a meal all the time.
To me, it has something to do with a serotonin overload after a meal which makes you drowsy. Carbs contains a lot of tryptophan.
The solution is definitely to eat less in one meal to avoid sugar spikes and eat less carbs and replace them with healthier food.


Are you serious? I literally just ordered this Country Life Choline yesterday because I thought it could help my poor short term memory... was this a mistake?

What do you mean short term memory? You start talking to someone about something and then some seconds or minutes after you have a hard time remembering what you were talking about or details of the discussion?
Short term memory loss can definitely cured with choline intake.
Inositol can also significantly solve short term memory issues due to serotonin depletion. (it desensitizes serotonin receptors)
I don't know if choline will exacerbate your symptoms, maybe I'm a special case.



Your post always useful and plain simple ,i will read more research about Inositol to desensitizes serotonin receptors

but lastime i tried give me panic attack

Panic attack? That's pretty uncommon, already heard of that though.
There are studies about that : http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/9169302
http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/8131066
Also some people who withdraw from SSRIs have seen a lot of improvement with it.
Choline can also reverse serotonin desentitization (more ACh means less SE, more SE means more ACh), this is pretty powerful when you experience psychedelic induced short term memory loss.

#18 xeon

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 10:56 PM

renfr: Amazing. So, you are saying taking choline can reverse the memory impairments caused from ingesting marijuana?
Also, when you said "(more ACh means less SE, more SE means more ACh)", was that a typo or am I simply misunderstanding it?

Edited by xeon, 05 January 2013 - 10:57 PM.


#19 Thorsten2

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:03 AM

Haven't had time to read the thread, but I think the OP needs to be posting this in the nutrition forum, and whilst you're at it, OP, read some threads over there.

Of course, eating low grade carbs at lunch time (in sufficient quantities), is going to hit your energy levels. You can gorge on fruit all day, and not get fatigue. Fruit will keep your blood sugar stable. It gets a bad rep on here because it apparently contains 'fructose'. But the fructose it contains, is nowhere near the level of the man made crap that is put into food that most people eat, on a daily basis! When you eat stuff, if it makes you feel like shit, ditch it. Fruit never has this effect on me. Eat it in moderation to keep you going, ditch the heavy carbs like bread, pasta and pastries.

Eliminate all the bull shit, and change around your macronutrient ratios, until you find something that works.

Me personally, I eat sufficient protein with each meal. Limiting carb intake is indeed important. Potatos at lunch time will make you snooze. Eat them at night, if you really have to. Which indeed I do.

#20 renfr

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:42 AM

Yeah it was a typo, more SE = less ACh.
I don't know for marijuana, it depends if the memory impairment was induced by a lack of serotonin or not. However it does work for SSRIs, psychedelics and can help with MDMA (though MDMA serotonin damage is much more serious)

#21 xeon

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:18 PM

Haven't had time to read the thread, but I think the OP needs to be posting this in the nutrition forum, and whilst you're at it, OP, read some threads over there.

Of course, eating low grade carbs at lunch time (in sufficient quantities), is going to hit your energy levels. You can gorge on fruit all day, and not get fatigue. Fruit will keep your blood sugar stable. It gets a bad rep on here because it apparently contains 'fructose'. But the fructose it contains, is nowhere near the level of the man made crap that is put into food that most people eat, on a daily basis! When you eat stuff, if it makes you feel like shit, ditch it. Fruit never has this effect on me. Eat it in moderation to keep you going, ditch the heavy carbs like bread, pasta and pastries.

Eliminate all the bull shit, and change around your macronutrient ratios, until you find something that works.

Me personally, I eat sufficient protein with each meal. Limiting carb intake is indeed important. Potatos at lunch time will make you snooze. Eat them at night, if you really have to. Which indeed I do.


Awesome. I will be taking yours and others' advice on this. I have been looking into green smoothies, etc. However I posted on here because I also have several Brain Health related questions. :P Is there a type of gluten-free protein powder available?

Yeah it was a typo, more SE = less ACh.
I don't know for marijuana, it depends if the memory impairment was induced by a lack of serotonin or not. However it does work for SSRIs, psychedelics and can help with MDMA (though MDMA serotonin damage is much more serious)


I see. Do you have any information on what neurotransmitter systems are involved in memory? I used to think it was strictly SE. Now I know the ACh has a lot to do with it. I want to gather as much information on this as I can so I can enhance my poor short term memory!

#22 renfr

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:59 PM

well serotonin seems to be mostly involved in immediate and short term memory. all neurotransmitters have some kind of link with memory.
acetylcholine can likely increase and/or sustain long term potentiation through myelin enhancement around the axons of neurons, it's also involved in neuroplasticity.
dopamine is kind of a double sided molecule, it's mostly involved in "emotive" memory, it stores memory when you learn but it can destroy memory if concentrations remain high during non-learning phase, that's why sleep is essential as sleep decreases dopamine concentration thanks to melatonin production.
glutamate is also involved in memory, it is the most excitatory neurotransmitter and therefore too much of it can destroy neurons through excitotoxicity.
serotonin is likely the one you need to higher.

#23 xeon

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:10 PM

well serotonin seems to be mostly involved in immediate and short term memory. all neurotransmitters have some kind of link with memory.
acetylcholine can likely increase and/or sustain long term potentiation through myelin enhancement around the axons of neurons, it's also involved in neuroplasticity.
dopamine is kind of a double sided molecule, it's mostly involved in "emotive" memory, it stores memory when you learn but it can destroy memory if concentrations remain high during non-learning phase, that's why sleep is essential as sleep decreases dopamine concentration thanks to melatonin production.
glutamate is also involved in memory, it is the most excitatory neurotransmitter and therefore too much of it can destroy neurons through excitotoxicity.
serotonin is likely the one you need to higher.


Awesome. So basically I should experiment with supplements like 5-HTP, L-Tryptophan, and Choline and find what works best, right?

Sometimes I feel like all my neurotransmitters are low for me. But I'm not exactly sure how to tell except basic stuff like SE relates to mood, memory, etc., and DA has to do with motivation, and I'm still confused on the role of NE.

Another example of the fatigue I experience: when I get stressed out over something like an argument with a family member, shortly thereafter I become extremely exhausted physically and mentally and feel like I need to just lay down and rest for hours. Sometimes even mild stress/upset causes that. I used to never run out of energy as little as 2 years ago. I'm just trying to figure out my energy levels problems and memory issues. When I wake up in the morning and until ~5 hours later I will be fine, then mental fatigue sets in. And with meals, too. Even if I don't eat these supposed "allergens", it still happens.

#24 GetOutOfBox

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:25 AM

I just want to bump this to note that feelings of sluggishness after eating a meal (any time between 20 minutes-four hours after) is referred to as "Reactive Hypoglycemia", that is, hypoglycemia paradoxically caused by elevated blood sugar (so blood sugar goes up, then plummets). It's theorized to be caused either by being pathologically oversensitive to the endocrine hormone epinephrine, or possibly by inadequate secretion of glucagon by the pancreas. Either way, there is no firmly validated treatment, though the best way to avoid the symptoms is to avoid large, carbohydrate/sugar rich meals and instead have multiple smaller meals throughout the day. Avoid foods that are high in sugar/carbs (that is, don't eat to much of them. It's alright to eat them in low quantities throughout the day, but do not consume a bunch at once).

As for supplements that could help, it's possible that drugs/supplements that increase MAO/COMT activity could reduce epinephrine levels and thus prevent overstimulation of epinephrine receptors. However, any supplement that increases MAO/COMT activity will also reduce the levels of other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin. Decreasing the presence of those neurotransmitters could cause various cognitive issues, such as anhedonia, anxiety, depression, etc. I would stick with dietary modification.
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#25 SIothy

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:39 AM

About 6 months ago I became vegan and I can attest to the fact that eating a vegetable heavy diet will help you lose that sluggish feeling after eating. I rarely ever get that feeling after eating anymore.Most of the problem comes from consuming processed foods, the body has to use much more energy to digest the food and turn it into something usable which means it leaves you with less energy after eating. Eating more whole foods that don't have chemicals, preservatives, coloring,hydrogenated oils, etc.. will help with the sluggish feeling. I eat a lot of whole wheat pita bread(because it has only 5 ingredients and no nasty chemicals) and I still never get sleepy afterwards. Like others have said it could also be a problem with gluten intolerance. Good luck with changing your diet, I've been extremely happy and energetic since I switched mine.
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#26 xeon

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:40 AM

I just want to bump this to note that feelings of sluggishness after eating a meal (any time between 20 minutes-four hours after) is referred to as "Reactive Hypoglycemia", that is, hypoglycemia paradoxically caused by elevated blood sugar (so blood sugar goes up, then plummets). It's theorized to be caused either by being pathologically oversensitive to the endocrine hormone epinephrine, or possibly by inadequate secretion of glucagon by the pancreas. Either way, there is no firmly validated treatment, though the best way to avoid the symptoms is to avoid large, carbohydrate/sugar rich meals and instead have multiple smaller meals throughout the day. Avoid foods that are high in sugar/carbs (that is, don't eat to much of them. It's alright to eat them in low quantities throughout the day, but do not consume a bunch at once).

As for supplements that could help, it's possible that drugs/supplements that increase MAO/COMT activity could reduce epinephrine levels and thus prevent overstimulation of epinephrine receptors. However, any supplement that increases MAO/COMT activity will also reduce the levels of other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin. Decreasing the presence of those neurotransmitters could cause various cognitive issues, such as anhedonia, anxiety, depression, etc. I would stick with dietary modification.


What about Bacopa?

#27 GetOutOfBox

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:14 AM


I just want to bump this to note that feelings of sluggishness after eating a meal (any time between 20 minutes-four hours after) is referred to as "Reactive Hypoglycemia", that is, hypoglycemia paradoxically caused by elevated blood sugar (so blood sugar goes up, then plummets). It's theorized to be caused either by being pathologically oversensitive to the endocrine hormone epinephrine, or possibly by inadequate secretion of glucagon by the pancreas. Either way, there is no firmly validated treatment, though the best way to avoid the symptoms is to avoid large, carbohydrate/sugar rich meals and instead have multiple smaller meals throughout the day. Avoid foods that are high in sugar/carbs (that is, don't eat to much of them. It's alright to eat them in low quantities throughout the day, but do not consume a bunch at once).

As for supplements that could help, it's possible that drugs/supplements that increase MAO/COMT activity could reduce epinephrine levels and thus prevent overstimulation of epinephrine receptors. However, any supplement that increases MAO/COMT activity will also reduce the levels of other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin. Decreasing the presence of those neurotransmitters could cause various cognitive issues, such as anhedonia, anxiety, depression, etc. I would stick with dietary modification.


What about Bacopa?


It inhibits COMT, which means more dopamine, norepinephrine and most relevant to you (possibly), epinephrine. This is the opposite of what you want to try, as if elevated sensitivity to epinephrine is causing your reactive hypoglycemia, elevating it would worsen it. You want something that increases epinephrine metabolism. I'm not certain at the moment what may do that, as in most cases people want the opposite in regards to neurotransmitters (keep in mind epinephrine is both a neurotransmitter and a systemic hormone, aka Adrenaline). The only compound that I've read increases COMT activity is SAMe, and most studies seem to indicate it's best not to use it indefinetly. However, it may be worth cycling it to see if it helps. Keep an eye out for symptoms related to reduced levels of various neurotransmitters (low dopamine: low motivation, less pleasure. low serotonin: depression. low norepinephrine: impaired concentration).

#28 xeon

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:37 AM



I just want to bump this to note that feelings of sluggishness after eating a meal (any time between 20 minutes-four hours after) is referred to as "Reactive Hypoglycemia", that is, hypoglycemia paradoxically caused by elevated blood sugar (so blood sugar goes up, then plummets). It's theorized to be caused either by being pathologically oversensitive to the endocrine hormone epinephrine, or possibly by inadequate secretion of glucagon by the pancreas. Either way, there is no firmly validated treatment, though the best way to avoid the symptoms is to avoid large, carbohydrate/sugar rich meals and instead have multiple smaller meals throughout the day. Avoid foods that are high in sugar/carbs (that is, don't eat to much of them. It's alright to eat them in low quantities throughout the day, but do not consume a bunch at once).

As for supplements that could help, it's possible that drugs/supplements that increase MAO/COMT activity could reduce epinephrine levels and thus prevent overstimulation of epinephrine receptors. However, any supplement that increases MAO/COMT activity will also reduce the levels of other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and serotonin. Decreasing the presence of those neurotransmitters could cause various cognitive issues, such as anhedonia, anxiety, depression, etc. I would stick with dietary modification.


What about Bacopa?


It inhibits COMT, which means more dopamine, norepinephrine and most relevant to you (possibly), epinephrine. This is the opposite of what you want to try, as if elevated sensitivity to epinephrine is causing your reactive hypoglycemia, elevating it would worsen it. You want something that increases epinephrine metabolism. I'm not certain at the moment what may do that, as in most cases people want the opposite in regards to neurotransmitters (keep in mind epinephrine is both a neurotransmitter and a systemic hormone, aka Adrenaline). The only compound that I've read increases COMT activity is SAMe, and most studies seem to indicate it's best not to use it indefinetly. However, it may be worth cycling it to see if it helps. Keep an eye out for symptoms related to reduced levels of various neurotransmitters (low dopamine: low motivation, less pleasure. low serotonin: depression. low norepinephrine: impaired concentration).


I'm kind of confused on this right now.. I do feel like I am super-sensitive to adrenaline, as you said, but how can I reduce this without worsening my depression/anxiety/low motivation? I was totally unaware that Bacopa inhibits COMT as well. Can you provide a source on that? I read that Bacopa regulated dopamine, and sometimes lowered it... and I thought it had no effect on adrenaline/noradrenaline.

Edited by xeon, 11 February 2013 - 04:40 AM.


#29 digik

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 06:10 AM

+1 for GetOutOf Box's advice regarding reactive hypoglycemia and blood sugar stabilization with natural fruit. I battled similar lethargy following my first meal of the day and have integrated this advice with successful outcome.

Besides fluctuating blood sugar levels, large first meals and dehydration from sleep can also cause severe blood pressure drops. Try rehydrating with an electrolytic drink 30 minutes prior to your first meal and having smaller, more frequent meals and snacks through out the day.

FWIW, I haven't had any issues with 500-750 mg/daily citicoline. Regarding weight gain, get yourself a good protein supplement & creatine for building lean muscle mass if you work out regularly.

Edited by digik, 11 February 2013 - 06:12 AM.


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#30 xeon

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 06:19 AM

+1 for GetOutOf Box's advice regarding reactive hypoglycemia and blood sugar stabilization with natural fruit. I battled similar lethargy following my first meal of the day and have integrated this advice with successful outcome.

Besides fluctuating blood sugar levels, large first meals and dehydration from sleep can also cause severe blood pressure drops. Try rehydrating with an electrolytic drink 30 minutes prior to your first meal and having smaller, more frequent meals and snacks through out the day.

FWIW, I haven't had any issues with 500-750 mg/daily citicoline. Regarding weight gain, get yourself a good protein supplement & creatine for building lean muscle mass if you work out regularly.


Thanks! Powerade/fruit smoothies in the morning. Lots of exercise and whey protein (already in my regimen). What about regular choline?





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