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mitoq sponsored thread

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#61 Vastmandana

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 06:02 AM

I'm coming in late on this, having just plunged into the NR realm.....

 

Is there no "doctor" or "health professional" in the LongeCity house?  The discount is significant and while I'd love to partake in this as an additional adjunct to the NR therapy, I've just spent $700+ on NR while I'm working (winter is not kind to "gardeners", financially!)

 

Or at least I'm hoping for another "group buy" discount for us new comers...I just recently rejoined and at 64 I'd somehow wangle a 4 or 5 month's supply to get me through winter to give it and NR a good try...

 

How bout it, Greg?  Another discount for us who missed on the first one?  Or at least until someone digs up a "health professional" on the forum.... I'll volunteer to repackage/remail if need be; I'll have time during the rainy season, which I hope comes soon in northern California.



#62 tintinet

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Posted 12 October 2014 - 12:27 PM

I'd be in for one, also, thanks.

#63 gregmacpherson

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 09:17 PM

Hi All, 

 

We are running a short promotion on this link ... www.mitoq.com/energy.  

 

The limit is 3 bottles but a good deal.  

 

Some new exciting research on MitoQ for those that are interested ...

 

A Mitochondrial-Targeted Coenzyme Q Analog Prevents Weight Gain and Ameliorates Hepatic Dysfunction in High Fat-Fed Mice.     http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25301169

 

 

The mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant MitoQ ameliorates metabolic syndrome features in obesogenic diet-fed rats better than Apocynin or Allopurinol. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25066801

 

 

Mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species mediate caspase-dependent and -independent neuronal deaths. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25239010

 

Thanks all - for your continued interest in MitoQ.  We have some further news coming later this month that will be of interest to the Longecity community.

 

All the best

 

Greg


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#64 The Ripper

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 09:43 PM

Hi All, 

 

We are running a short promotion on this link ... www.mitoq.com/energy.  

 

The limit is 3 bottles but a good deal.  

 

Some new exciting research on MitoQ for those that are interested ...

 

A Mitochondrial-Targeted Coenzyme Q Analog Prevents Weight Gain and Ameliorates Hepatic Dysfunction in High Fat-Fed Mice.     http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25301169

 

 

The mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant MitoQ ameliorates metabolic syndrome features in obesogenic diet-fed rats better than Apocynin or Allopurinol. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25066801

 

 

Mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species mediate caspase-dependent and -independent neuronal deaths. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/25239010

 

Thanks all - for your continued interest in MitoQ.  We have some further news coming later this month that will be of interest to the Longecity community.

 

All the best

 

Greg

I tried the link and it's US-only. Is there a chance of people from other countries receiving a discount soon too?



#65 gregmacpherson

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 09:45 PM

Hi, send me a direct email and I will dig up a code for you.  Thanks

 


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#66 The Ripper

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Posted 19 October 2014 - 09:55 PM

Hi, send me a direct email and I will dig up a code for you.  Thanks

I sent you a PM if that's what you meant. I couldn't see your e-mail address anywhere



#67 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 03:51 AM

Greg,

 

Thanks for the discount.  Greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Dan

 

 



#68 Dan1976

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 04:45 PM

I'm upset. Just ordered and didn't know about the discount. :)

Doesn't matter. I will get back to Longecity with my experience. Can't wait to receive the Mitoq.

#69 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 12:58 AM

Greg,

 

Two questions.

 

Given that one application of mitoq is to improve skin quality, I'm wondering if there is any evidence for it improving either keloids or hypertrophic scars?  Now, obviously that is a very specialized application and something that improves skin in general might not improve keloids.

 

Secondly, are there any studies of mitoq's effect on Alzheimer's disease?

 

Thanks,

 

 



#70 The Ripper

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:27 AM

Greg,

 

Two questions.

 

Given that one application of mitoq is to improve skin quality, I'm wondering if there is any evidence for it improving either keloids or hypertrophic scars?  Now, obviously that is a very specialized application and something that improves skin in general might not improve keloids.

 

Secondly, are there any studies of mitoq's effect on Alzheimer's disease?

 

Thanks,

Any answer to your first question would surely be speculation. The studies done on topical MitoQ are exceptionally weak. The only one I found off their website was a paid trial/study done by a dermatology clinic. The rest would probably be inference based off other topical mitochondria-targetted antioxidants. Given that it's their most expensive product I'd really like to see more invested into determining the best vehicle for it, what its real effects are, and so on.

Furthermore, whilst I understand it's simple a matter of capitalism and old women willing to pay lots of money for it I do wish the serum were cheaper (for what it is... in its current form). I find it very hard to justify paying so much money for what is essentially Glycerine and Mitoquinol Mesylate. It's a very cheap formula. For the price I would expect some harder studies and perhaps a sort of liposomal formulation.

Not to go too hard on MitoQ. It's still a solid product that I use and I'm grateful that they haven't opted to put any pro-ageing ingredients in such as D-Panthenol. 



#71 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:44 AM

 

Greg,

 

Two questions.

 

Given that one application of mitoq is to improve skin quality, I'm wondering if there is any evidence for it improving either keloids or hypertrophic scars?  Now, obviously that is a very specialized application and something that improves skin in general might not improve keloids.

 

Secondly, are there any studies of mitoq's effect on Alzheimer's disease?

 

Thanks,

Any answer to your first question would surely be speculation. The studies done on topical MitoQ are exceptionally weak. The only one I found off their website was a paid trial/study done by a dermatology clinic. The rest would probably be inference based off other topical mitochondria-targetted antioxidants. Given that it's their most expensive product I'd really like to see more invested into determining the best vehicle for it, what its real effects are, and so on.

Furthermore, whilst I understand it's simple a matter of capitalism and old women willing to pay lots of money for it I do wish the serum were cheaper (for what it is... in its current form). I find it very hard to justify paying so much money for what is essentially Glycerine and Mitoquinol Mesylate. It's a very cheap formula. For the price I would expect some harder studies and perhaps a sort of liposomal formulation.

Not to go too hard on MitoQ. It's still a solid product that I use and I'm grateful that they haven't opted to put any pro-ageing ingredients in such as D-Panthenol. 

 

 

 

Thanks for the reply.  In fact, I was really asking about oral MitoQ, not the topical product. 

 


 



#72 The Ripper

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 06:29 AM

 

 

Greg,

 

Two questions.

 

Given that one application of mitoq is to improve skin quality, I'm wondering if there is any evidence for it improving either keloids or hypertrophic scars?  Now, obviously that is a very specialized application and something that improves skin in general might not improve keloids.

 

Secondly, are there any studies of mitoq's effect on Alzheimer's disease?

 

Thanks,

Any answer to your first question would surely be speculation. The studies done on topical MitoQ are exceptionally weak. The only one I found off their website was a paid trial/study done by a dermatology clinic. The rest would probably be inference based off other topical mitochondria-targetted antioxidants. Given that it's their most expensive product I'd really like to see more invested into determining the best vehicle for it, what its real effects are, and so on.

Furthermore, whilst I understand it's simple a matter of capitalism and old women willing to pay lots of money for it I do wish the serum were cheaper (for what it is... in its current form). I find it very hard to justify paying so much money for what is essentially Glycerine and Mitoquinol Mesylate. It's a very cheap formula. For the price I would expect some harder studies and perhaps a sort of liposomal formulation.

Not to go too hard on MitoQ. It's still a solid product that I use and I'm grateful that they haven't opted to put any pro-ageing ingredients in such as D-Panthenol. 

 

 

 

Thanks for the reply.  In fact, I was really asking about oral MitoQ, not the topical product. 

 

 

 

My bad! I was confused by the whole "one application" part



#73 gregmacpherson

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 11:24 PM

 

 

Greg,

 

Two questions.

 

Given that one application of mitoq is to improve skin quality, I'm wondering if there is any evidence for it improving either keloids or hypertrophic scars?  Now, obviously that is a very specialized application and something that improves skin in general might not improve keloids.

 

Secondly, are there any studies of mitoq's effect on Alzheimer's disease?

 

Thanks,

Any answer to your first question would surely be speculation. The studies done on topical MitoQ are exceptionally weak. The only one I found off their website was a paid trial/study done by a dermatology clinic. The rest would probably be inference based off other topical mitochondria-targetted antioxidants. Given that it's their most expensive product I'd really like to see more invested into determining the best vehicle for it, what its real effects are, and so on.

Furthermore, whilst I understand it's simple a matter of capitalism and old women willing to pay lots of money for it I do wish the serum were cheaper (for what it is... in its current form). I find it very hard to justify paying so much money for what is essentially Glycerine and Mitoquinol Mesylate. It's a very cheap formula. For the price I would expect some harder studies and perhaps a sort of liposomal formulation.

Not to go too hard on MitoQ. It's still a solid product that I use and I'm grateful that they haven't opted to put any pro-ageing ingredients in such as D-Panthenol. 

 

 

 

Thanks for the reply.  In fact, I was really asking about oral MitoQ, not the topical product. 

 

 

 

Hi Both,  

 

On the topical MitoQ front, we have data indicating that MitoQ serum can improve the appearance of scaring but not specifically keloid scars. We also have done work on absorption rates and the current formulation delivers good levels of MitoQ locally. These studies are not published but we have further research underway that will come out next year. 

 

I am not sure that the oral formulation would have an effect on reducing scarring so better to opt for the topical. 

 

Thanks

 

Greg



#74 gregmacpherson

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 11:36 PM

Greg,

 

Two questions.

 

Given that one application of mitoq is to improve skin quality, I'm wondering if there is any evidence for it improving either keloids or hypertrophic scars?  Now, obviously that is a very specialized application and something that improves skin in general might not improve keloids.

 

Secondly, are there any studies of mitoq's effect on Alzheimer's disease?

 

Thanks,

 

And to answer your second question ... yes, there is some work done on Alzheimer's in models of the disease.

 

http://www.jneurosci.../44/15703.short

 

http://www.sciencedi...891584910013985

 

http://www.sciencedi...891584914001099

 

A paper on Parkinson's Disease also if of interest.

 

http://www.sciencedi...891584910005277

 

Thanks

 

Greg



#75 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 06:34 AM

Greg,

 

Thanks for the info on MitoQ and Alzheimer's.  My father appears to be headed down that path and I am giving him MitoQ in combination with a few other supplements that are shown to have some positive impact on the disease process.

 

I myself have been taking MitoQ for a couple of months now, which raises a question.  I've notice an uptick in the amount of acne I have here and there.  It's been going on for long enough that it believe it to be a real effect, though I can't say for sure that my starting MitoQ is the cause.  I'm wondering if you've had any other persons taking MitoQ that noticed an increase in acne?

 

Thanks,

 

 



#76 gregmacpherson

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 11:09 PM

Greg,

 

Thanks for the info on MitoQ and Alzheimer's.  My father appears to be headed down that path and I am giving him MitoQ in combination with a few other supplements that are shown to have some positive impact on the disease process.

 

I myself have been taking MitoQ for a couple of months now, which raises a question.  I've notice an uptick in the amount of acne I have here and there.  It's been going on for long enough that it believe it to be a real effect, though I can't say for sure that my starting MitoQ is the cause.  I'm wondering if you've had any other persons taking MitoQ that noticed an increase in acne?

 

Thanks,

 

Hi Daniel, 

 

All the best with helping your father. I hope MitoQ gives him some benefit. 

 

Regarding acne - I am not aware of it causing this issue and no-one else has reported that effect.  The best way to know for sure is to take a break and see if it resolves.  However, I would recommend continuing on with MitoQ as it could be a short term effect that resolves. I noticed a number of different effects over the first few months and put it down to various organ systems firing up at different speeds before settling in to a new normal. 

 

Thanks



#77 pone11

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:07 AM

 

An interesting MitoQ study came out recently (see ScienceDaily: Novel antioxidant makes old arteries seem young again 5/6/14)... that reversed some of the effects of endothelial dysfunction in mice.

 

Would you know if there are any differences between the MitoQ supplement and the type of MitoQ that was given to the mice? The mice received MitoQ in water. I also didn't see any dosage information, so it would be interesting to estimate what the human dosage would be. I'm waiting for MitoQ-enhansed bottled water now.

 

thanks

 

x

 

Yes, it is the same MitoQ that is in the supplement.    

 

In terms of dosing - we recommend 10mg per day for healthy adults over 30.  If you have a specific condition associated with increased oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to the condition then we suggest 20mg.  We are aware of others taking a higher dose but would recommend you do that under the supervision of your physician. 

 

 

I don't see how you can expect to develop a large audience for your product at the current price.  60 capsules at 5 mg/each for $60 means if you take 20 mg a day you have a 15 day supply.   No one is going to spend $120/month for a single supplement.



#78 niner

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:26 AM

I don't see how you can expect to develop a large audience for your product at the current price.  60 capsules at 5 mg/each for $60 means if you take 20 mg a day you have a 15 day supply.   No one is going to spend $120/month for a single supplement.

 

I think we're starting to see the blurring of lines between supplements and pharmaceuticals.   Since MitoQ is a synthetic compound not found in nature, I really don't see how it can be considered a supplement.  The fact that it's being marketed like a supplement is, I suspect, more a matter of flying under the radar than anything else.   I've heard a rumor that one of the big pharma companies is going to be moving into the supplement space.  They're used to high margins, so I wouldn't expect the product to be cheap, should it materialize.  Meanwhile, $120 a month is not unusual for a drug that does something useful.  MitoQ (and c60oo) meet some distinct unmet medical needs.  If they came out of Big Pharma and were FDA approved, you (or rather, your insurance company) could expect to be paying a lot more that $120 a month.



#79 pone11

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:32 AM

Hi, A good question.

 

MitoQ and MitoTEMPO have a similar effect and can be interchanged. 

 

This interesting research came out over the weekend. http://www.cell.com/...(14)00527-0.pdf

 

Just reading:  is MitoTempo basically a synthetic imitation of SOD?   Is it controlled as a research substance rather than a nutritional supplement because it is not a naturally occurring substance?

 

What's the mechanism for MitoTempo getting into mitochondria?



#80 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:44 AM

 

I don't see how you can expect to develop a large audience for your product at the current price.  60 capsules at 5 mg/each for $60 means if you take 20 mg a day you have a 15 day supply.   No one is going to spend $120/month for a single supplement.

 

I think we're starting to see the blurring of lines between supplements and pharmaceuticals.   Since MitoQ is a synthetic compound not found in nature, I really don't see how it can be considered a supplement.  The fact that it's being marketed like a supplement is, I suspect, more a matter of flying under the radar than anything else.   I've heard a rumor that one of the big pharma companies is going to be moving into the supplement space.  They're used to high margins, so I wouldn't expect the product to be cheap, should it materialize.  Meanwhile, $120 a month is not unusual for a drug that does something useful.  MitoQ (and c60oo) meet some distinct unmet medical needs.  If they came out of Big Pharma and were FDA approved, you (or rather, your insurance company) could expect to be paying a lot more that $120 a month.

 

 

I'm just grateful that we can still purchase these compounds for our personal use.  MitoQ is an interesting compound but absent it being a silver bullet for a particular disease it is not going to get FDA approval as no one could afford the cost.

 

We have moved into realm where scientist can design compounds for a particular effect but the methodology for FDA approval hasn't really caught up.



#81 pone11

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 05:31 AM

 

I don't see how you can expect to develop a large audience for your product at the current price.  60 capsules at 5 mg/each for $60 means if you take 20 mg a day you have a 15 day supply.   No one is going to spend $120/month for a single supplement.

 

I think we're starting to see the blurring of lines between supplements and pharmaceuticals.   Since MitoQ is a synthetic compound not found in nature, I really don't see how it can be considered a supplement.  The fact that it's being marketed like a supplement is, I suspect, more a matter of flying under the radar than anything else.   I've heard a rumor that one of the big pharma companies is going to be moving into the supplement space.  They're used to high margins, so I wouldn't expect the product to be cheap, should it materialize.  Meanwhile, $120 a month is not unusual for a drug that does something useful.  MitoQ (and c60oo) meet some distinct unmet medical needs.  If they came out of Big Pharma and were FDA approved, you (or rather, your insurance company) could expect to be paying a lot more that $120 a month.

 

 

You will never get insurance to pay for this?   What is the market for something that is priced like a pharmaceutical but sold as a supplement?   The only people who will buy this as it is currently priced are hard core scientific life extension enthusiasts.

 

It's easy to fantasize about making something like this a licensed drug therapy that you can rip off insurance companies and taxpayers by charging $10K a year for.  But I think at this point the cost of creating a drug in the US is something like $200M (or more if you have to repeat phase III studies enough times).   Many companies want the benefits of that approval, but raising that much money and sticking with the process for 15 years is grueling.

 

And in the end you would end up with a tightly controlled substance approved for only very narrow diseases that were the subject of the testing process.   Off label applications might take 10 years to develop.

 

Not only do I think the pharmaceutical path would be a wrong business decision for a tiny New Zealand based company, but I think it would be a travesty for mankind, to lose the benefit of the substance for 15 years while they struggle to find financing, partners, and go through the lengthy and frustrating regulatory process.

 

Putting my business hat on, the way you can maximize your take on something like this is by offering very steep discounts for some kind of subscription service, so that a person committing to buy at least one 60-pack per month ends up getting a price that is more like a regular supplement.   You can charge a higher price for ala carte purchases by people who are not subscribers.   They could work out logistics for distribution so that the dirty work of shipping is done by some larger entity taking maybe 5% off the table.   Once you develop enough subscription relationships you have a real annuity that keeps paying off, and you also have a built in distribution system for your future mitochondrial based supplements like their MitoLipoic.



#82 pone11

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 05:37 AM

I'm just grateful that we can still purchase these compounds for our personal use.  MitoQ is an interesting compound but absent it being a silver bullet for a particular disease it is not going to get FDA approval as no one could afford the cost.

 

We have moved into realm where scientist can design compounds for a particular effect but the methodology for FDA approval hasn't really caught up.

 

 

My advice to any small group doing life extension research with substances that resemble nutritional supplements would be to stay out of the US and sell through distributors here.  The second the FDA smells you making even one claim of benefit to any specific patient group they will shut you down and make you spend the $200M to approve a drug.   Look what happened to Boyd Haley, who created a terrific chelator for mercury and got shut down the second he pointed out that he would make autistic kids healthier.    If he had kept his mouth closed and instead just published mice studies, he could have helped millions of people eventually, just flying under the radar.   As things are now he has a relatively unfunded company trying to climb the FDA wall of worry and I don't see how he can do that.   All the FDA is doing is killing innovation and making huge companies huger by creating an impenetrable barrier to entry in the drug market.

 

Once you decide to sell to consumers under the radar, you have to drop the price to match the market.  Because those people are paying out of pocket, not through insurance.


Edited by pone11, 05 January 2015 - 05:39 AM.

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#83 Kalliste

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 07:51 AM


 

I don't see how you can expect to develop a large audience for your product at the current price.  60 capsules at 5 mg/each for $60 means if you take 20 mg a day you have a 15 day supply.   No one is going to spend $120/month for a single supplement.

 

 

With studies like this I see how they can. Imagine that a human trial is done and finds that you can get some, maybe even a large degree of metastasis inhibition, with MitoQ, MitoTEMPO or C60.

MitoQ already has a pretty good tox-profile for humans. I can see that ending up on the front page of some big websites.

A Mitochondrial Switch Promotes Tumor Metastasis

 

http://www.cell.com/...1247(14)00527-0


Edited by Cosmicalstorm, 05 January 2015 - 07:52 AM.

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#84 pone11

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 08:16 AM

 


 

I don't see how you can expect to develop a large audience for your product at the current price.  60 capsules at 5 mg/each for $60 means if you take 20 mg a day you have a 15 day supply.   No one is going to spend $120/month for a single supplement.

 

 

With studies like this I see how they can. Imagine that a human trial is done and finds that you can get some, maybe even a large degree of metastasis inhibition, with MitoQ, MitoTEMPO or C60.

MitoQ already has a pretty good tox-profile for humans. I can see that ending up on the front page of some big websites.

A Mitochondrial Switch Promotes Tumor Metastasis

 

http://www.cell.com/...1247(14)00527-0

 

 

I'm not doubting efficacy.  Hey, I am excited by it.   But let's walk up to 100 people who buy $100 or more of supplements each month and ask them would they spend $120 for this one.   I bet we get two customers out of 100 people.   

 

People are pretty numb to marketing claims.  So many people claim to cure cancer, cure aging, cure alzheimers, blah blah blah.  And the truth is most people don't have enough experience reading science and reading marketing to differentiate real from fantasy.  So they just shut down and get very cynical.  

 

At $120/month, you have to spend a huge amount on marketing to overcome that cynicism.   It would be a market better served by multi-level-marketing at that price.

 

On the other hand, if you had a high ala carte price, but a very low price for people who subscribe to regular refills, you could build a business model on fulfilling to those customers at the lower price, and you would have an annuity of repeat business every year for many years forward.  


Edited by pone11, 05 January 2015 - 08:18 AM.

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#85 gregmacpherson

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 09:36 PM

Hi All, 

 

Happy New Year!

 

Some good conversation in the above. 

 

A few points ... 

 

       For most people 2 capsules a day is enough to get benefit from MitoQ.  

 

       I understand your concern about the pricing but we feel that $2 a day is reasonable for a research based compound that protects and optimises mitochondrial         activity with all of the associated downstream benefits for cellular and organ system health.  

 

      I have a subscription model on our road map for later this year and also plan to offer Longecity members a regular discount option as well. 

 

     There is little point us going down the pharmaceutical path for the very reason that is mentioned above - the cost associated with the process and it would lock                 us in to one indication vs the many diseases and conditions that are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction that we are able to influence. 

 

MitoQ has some quite interesting developments on the horizon that I will be able to share with you soon.  It is going to be an interesting year. 

 

Wishing you all the best for 2015 and thanks for your interest in MitoQ.

 

Greg

 

 

 

 

 


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#86 Razor444

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 07:38 PM


I have a subscription model on our road map for later this year and also plan to offer Longecity members a regular discount option as well. 

 

 

 

Hi Greg,

Is there any temporary discount code or link that could be used?

MitoQ is still working well.

Thanks!



#87 gregmacpherson

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 12:36 AM

 


I have a subscription model on our road map for later this year and also plan to offer Longecity members a regular discount option as well. 

 

 

 

Hi Greg,

Is there any temporary discount code or link that could be used?

MitoQ is still working well.

Thanks!

 

 

Hi, nothing at the moment I am sorry. Thanks

 



#88 alc

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 05:50 PM

 

Greg,

 

Is there any potential for either negative interactions or synergy between MitoQ and Nicotinamide Riboside (Niagen) or Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ)?

 

Hi Daniel, 

 

I have taken PQQ with MitoQ and not noticed any additional benefits.  PQQ is meant to increase mitochondrial numbers from what I understand but if you are getting more from function from your existing mitochondria via MitoQ then I think it is unnecessary to add PQQ into the mix. 

 

Niagen on the other hand appears that it could be quite synergistic with MitoQ. I don't have any personal experience with it but it makes sense that if we have our mitochondria working optimally and you add in optimised substrate/fuel then there could be worthwhile benefits.  

 

If you decide to combine these please let me know how you get on. 

 

Thanks. 

 

 

I do take MitoQ 5 mg + Niagen (NR) 250 mg + TransResveratrol w/Ptero 100 mg in the morning.

I started like two months ago with MitoQ 5mg. Did not feel anything.

But after I started to add Niagen I did feel a positive difference (more energy, more positive attitude, much lower appetite - after I take Niagen, I can literally go on hours and hours without the need of eating)

I hope is not the placebo effect as I started Niagen just three weeks ago.

 

And I do have couple questions for Greg:

 

1. when I got my MitoQ capsules, the seal on the bottles was more like a cosmetic thing and actually one botlle the seal was "floating". Can you please add a real seal, aluminum foil or something? MitoQ is expensive, and I would like to see a well designed bottle/seal. - thanks

 

2. Are you conducting other studies to see how MitoQ works with other components, like Nicotinamode Riboside, AMPK activators, Telomerase activators like TA-65, C60, etc.

I'm refering to human studies, as we see lots of mice studies that not always apply to humans.

 

3. Do you work on improving MitoQ? like mechanism of delivery, increase efficiency/effects, etc.

 

4. How do you compare it with SkQ1 - I'm refering to Mitotech

 

http://www.mitotechpharma.com/

 

5. Any chance is getting cheaper?

 

Looking forward to your replies.

 

Thank you.
 



#89 gregmacpherson

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 08:14 PM

 

 

Greg,

 

Is there any potential for either negative interactions or synergy between MitoQ and Nicotinamide Riboside (Niagen) or Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ)?

 

Hi Daniel, 

 

I have taken PQQ with MitoQ and not noticed any additional benefits.  PQQ is meant to increase mitochondrial numbers from what I understand but if you are getting more from function from your existing mitochondria via MitoQ then I think it is unnecessary to add PQQ into the mix. 

 

Niagen on the other hand appears that it could be quite synergistic with MitoQ. I don't have any personal experience with it but it makes sense that if we have our mitochondria working optimally and you add in optimised substrate/fuel then there could be worthwhile benefits.  

 

If you decide to combine these please let me know how you get on. 

 

Thanks. 

 

 

I do take MitoQ 5 mg + Niagen (NR) 250 mg + TransResveratrol w/Ptero 100 mg in the morning.

I started like two months ago with MitoQ 5mg. Did not feel anything.

But after I started to add Niagen I did feel a positive difference (more energy, more positive attitude, much lower appetite - after I take Niagen, I can literally go on hours and hours without the need of eating)

I hope is not the placebo effect as I started Niagen just three weeks ago.

 

And I do have couple questions for Greg:

 

1. when I got my MitoQ capsules, the seal on the bottles was more like a cosmetic thing and actually one botlle the seal was "floating". Can you please add a real seal, aluminum foil or something? MitoQ is expensive, and I would like to see a well designed bottle/seal. - thanks

 

Thanks for the feedback ... I will review this part of our production process.

 

2. Are you conducting other studies to see how MitoQ works with other components, like Nicotinamode Riboside, AMPK activators, Telomerase activators like TA-65, C60, etc.

I'm refering to human studies, as we see lots of mice studies that not always apply to humans.

 

We are undertaking more human studies this year but nothing planned to include other components on the drawing board at this stage. 

 

I like Nicotinamide Riboside. If you get the mitochondria working optimally and reduce cellular oxidative stress with MitoQ and then add in a substrate like NR then it will synergistic. A 1 + 2 = 5 scenario perhaps. MitoQ has been shown to slow telomere shortening in one paper so potentially synergistic with TA-65 or it may be enough to slow down telomere shortening on its own. 

 

3. Do you work on improving MitoQ? like mechanism of delivery, increase efficiency/effects, etc.

 

Yes, we are constantly reviewing the best way to improve delivery and bio-availability. 

 

4. How do you compare it with SkQ1 - I'm refering to Mitotech

 

http://www.mitotechpharma.com/

 

SkQ1 is a good compound.  They use a plant based quinone which is the next best thing compared with MitoQ which is based on our natural cellular quinone - CoQ10. 

 

5. Any chance is getting cheaper?

 

Working on it ... watch this space. 

 

Looking forward to your replies.

 

Thank you.
 

 

Hi Daniel,

 

Answers in bold. 

 

Many thanks

 

Greg



#90 alc

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  • Location:Columbus, OH
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Posted 03 February 2015 - 09:18 PM

Greg - thanks for your replies!

 

I wanted to say couple more things:

 

1. Just the seal was a problem on the bottles. But as a side note, if the bottles can be smaller, would be a plus, as shipping them across the oceans get cheaper. - just my suggestion.

 

2. Same suggestion with the serum: I bough it for my wife, and the bottle is quite large. A smaller bottle, I guess will suffice.

 

3. I wanted to say something else, that after I started to take Niagen's NR with MitoQ, some days I tried taking only 2.5 mg of MitoQ (one pill) w/ 250 Niagen + 100 mg TransResveratrol, but I did feel the difference in good when I take 5 mg (two pills).

 

 

I do hope that your research is moving forward imrpoving MitoQ as well as  finding positive connections between MitoQ and NR and other telomerase activators!

 

thanks again!







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