• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
LongeCity .                       Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

Eidetic, Photographic Memory - Cracking the formula

eidetic photographic memory

  • Please log in to reply
143 replies to this topic

#121 Junk Master

  • Registered User
  • 993 posts
  • 80
  • Location:United States

Posted 17 February 2017 - 06:18 AM

Insufflating 20-30mg of Noopept definitely has an effect for me-- quite positive.  I like to pair it with an ongoing intra-insulin cycle, then give both a rest for a month or two.

 

Lately, I've been convinced the combo of lose dose caffeine/moda/and lion's mane/reishi might have something to it.

 

In any event, I find low moda and mushroom coffee from four sigmatic to be quite promising.



#122 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 17 February 2017 - 09:49 AM

Insufflating 20-30mg of Noopept definitely has an effect for me-- quite positive.  I like to pair it with an ongoing intra-insulin cycle, then give both a rest for a month or two.

 

Lately, I've been convinced the combo of lose dose caffeine/moda/and lion's mane/reishi might have something to it.

 

In any event, I find low moda and mushroom coffee from four sigmatic to be quite promising.

 

But how you compare this effect to the topic which is eidetic memory? I have used probably over 10g of noopept and it may had  some good effect on memory but for me nothing compared to being eidetic and now it gives me only brainfog so i stopped using it.



sponsored ad

  • Advert

#123 Junk Master

  • Registered User
  • 993 posts
  • 80
  • Location:United States

Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:17 PM

Insufflating 20-30mg of Noopept definitely has an effect for me-- quite positive. I like to pair it with an ongoing intra-insulin cycle, then give both a rest for a month or two.

Lately, I've been convinced the combo of lose dose caffeine/moda/and lion's mane/reishi might have something to it.

In any event, I find low moda and mushroom coffee from four sigmatic to be quite promising.


But how you compare this effect to the topic which is eidetic memory? I have used probably over 10g of noopept and it may had some good effect on memory but for me nothing compared to being eidetic and now it gives me only brainfog so i stopped using it.


#124 Junk Master

  • Registered User
  • 993 posts
  • 80
  • Location:United States

Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:24 PM

Don't believe that will come from a traditional pill. All of the above are just pieces in the puzzle to increase focus and mental stamina.

To truly crack the code I think we would have to go beyond mnemonic techniques and drugs/supplements-- though I still believe we have much room for improvement there (micro doses of novel hallucinogens, intercranial magnetic stimulation).

I think we'd be looking at inducing compensatory plasticity a la stroke victims, synesthetics...

#125 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 17 February 2017 - 07:10 PM

Most important thing is that we are looking for possibility of developing eidetic memory which is  kind of visual memory not very good or nearly perfect normal memory. Eidetic memory which would be short term one is still a good thing(remembering objects like pages of books with perect recall for less than lets say hour), mind would not have too much informations. Imagine if your mind makes 100 mental snapshots per second and would store it inside your brain, that sounds like a best way to lose senses. I have a big motivation to crack this code but not as big to try dangerous nootropics or hallucinogens, especially if they are expensive. Having this ability only after dosing a experimental sustance and possibility of getting huge negative side effects is not good IMO.


Edited by Grandmaster, 17 February 2017 - 07:12 PM.


#126 Junk Master

  • Registered User
  • 993 posts
  • 80
  • Location:United States

Posted 18 February 2017 - 09:36 PM

This is Longecity.  People here inject Cerebrolysin, as well HGH, Testosterone, designer steroids,  and all manner of Peptides.  IMO this is the cutting edge of the Brainhacking/Bodyhacking movement.  

 

Sure there are plenty of posts about what form of vitamin B is best, or polyphasic sleep etc, but if you are looking for some one who has tried something waaay out there and you send out a few PM'S I know for a fact you can find say, someone who has had an elective trepanation surgery (drilling a hole in your head) in an attempt to improve memory.  In

 

In fact, a few PM's not only put me in contact with a surgeon willing to preform an elective DBS or deep brain stimulation surgery on me to supposedly improve short term memory function impared by my 14 years of playing football-- for somewhere between $60,000 and $90,000.  I didn't even bother to see how cheaply I could get the operation done in say Thailand, India, or...Tijuana.

 

Point being, Noopept is FAR from expensive.  Even in a small quantity, say 5 grams, it's $7.99.  Since I had a very positive N1 response with 20 mg, that 8 bucks lasts 250 doses or roughly a YEAR.  I would venture to guess that's a small fraction of what 99% of the coffee drinking population spends on their Starbucks fix.

 

Then there's the "danger" in micro-doses of psilocybe, which I consider to be far less dangerous than taking OTC fat loss herbal formulations-- by far!  Probably less dangerous than drinking unfiltered tap water in urban areas, or using a brand of multi-vitamin from China.  Far less dangerous than eating at most fast food restaurants.

 

I could go on and on.

 

BTW the kind of short term memory you describe above isn't a fantasy, it's relatively easily achieved.  The catch is it requires PRACTICE, and the sort of onerous practice not many people are willing to put in.

 

I can point you to a book:  The Key to Study Skills by Anna and Lev Goldentouch (with Suraj Sharma)

 

Or if you'd like there are many free training techniques on Lev's blog www.keytostudy.com.

 

I have no financial interest in either the book or Lev's website, but I CAN tell you I have been diligently practicing a number of his techniques and have been able to increase my reading speed and retention from an above average 400 words per minute with 80% retention to close to 800 words per minute with the same or better retention.

 

With continued practice I fully expect to break the 1,000 word per minute barrier with the same retention.

 

However, when we make the leap into Kim Peek of Rain Man fame, who can read one page with each eye, and take in 10,000 words per minute, I really believe synesthesia becomes necessary.

 

Another example of a Nobel Prize Winner with synesthesia is Richard Feynman.  He claimed to see vague pictures of equations like Bessel functions in different colors.

 

Supposedly, neurologists have discovered anyone who preforms certain daily exercises can develop this a modicum of this skill-- IMO that's like saying because a Monk who has meditated eight straight years in a Himalayan cave can have subtle influences over body temp, resting pulse etc, that ANYONE who meditates can do it.

 

Point being, I believe I'm not alone as a long time member of this site in saying I'm most interested in methods of biohacking that show real scientific promise of effecting nearly "transhuman" change without having to live in a cave, or spend $90,000 for someone of dubious medical ethics to drill a hole in my skull.

 

The code you hope to crack seems eminently crackable with some hard work.  However, if there is a way to do so in far less time with relatively little cost and little danger, that's what I'm all about.

 

 


  • Enjoying the show x 1
  • Agree x 1

#127 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 20 February 2017 - 10:51 PM

I didn't say Noopept is expensive...Its very cost-effective since effective doses start from 10mg and as you wrote gram of this substance is relatively cheap. Point is that it doesn't improve visual memory. If we are talking about getting a real eidetic memory then it should be 100% retention, like with those 10 thousands of dots which Elizabeth has memorized and recalling poetry written in a foreign language that she did not understand years after she had first seen the poem. We are talking about this meaning of eidetic memory or just very good normal memory, not mental snapshots? This first(snapshots) option would make possible to memorize a book in minutes and quote it back with perfect recall and as we know from Elizabeth case its possible to have such ability.


Edited by Grandmaster, 20 February 2017 - 10:52 PM.


#128 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 21 February 2017 - 06:02 PM

This simple app looks interesting as we are talking about visual memory, dots have no numbers or some marks so using mnemonics is probably impossible in this one:

https://play.google....ox.visualmemory


Edited by Grandmaster, 21 February 2017 - 06:02 PM.


#129 Junk Master

  • Registered User
  • 993 posts
  • 80
  • Location:United States

Posted 22 February 2017 - 05:42 AM

Hmmm...think I have certain Autistic Spectrum traits-- high functioning after years of CBT/therapy and nootropic research-- but I've always had a visual memory and I believe many people "on the Spectrum" do.

 

So, for me, substances that increase "focus"-- nearly every substance banned by the FIDE Chess Organization:

 

Modafinil, Adrafinil, Armadofinil,  small doses of Phenibut with all former...large doses of piracetam, smaller doses of both Phenylpiracetam, and especially phenylpiracetam hydrazine; even caffeine in combo with L-theanine (to a lesser extent)...all help my visual memory.

 

Honestly, object focused meditation, if I do it on a regular basis is a very powerful tool.

 

I'd say aerobic exercise if done over 40 minutes at least five times a week is also very powerful.

 

 


Edited by Junk Master, 22 February 2017 - 05:43 AM.


#130 manny

  • Registered User
  • 264 posts
  • -1
  • Location:UK

Posted 22 February 2017 - 10:53 AM

Even though it's not exactly what you're looking for. It's probably the closest thing you'll get, as a training program that will give you similar results to a photographic memory.

 

Check out pmemory, a.k.a GMS (Giordano Memorization System).

 

Basically their claim to fame, is this mnemonic system will allow you to memorize entire books word for word.

 

I've been on the forum and dabbling in the system for the last 5 years. And though I've never been able to attain a decent level of it. I can see it would definitely be possible to memorize a book word for word.

 

The minimum passing skill people need to develop, is memorizing 300 random elements at 6 seconds each. However most people find lowering the seconds down to 3 seconds is easier for memorization (quicker means more focus and less mind wondering). So people who do get to this level, usually end up memorizing 300 elements at 3 seconds each. 900 secs = 15 minutes.

 

Each element is usually a FC of a 2 digit number. 

 

So essentially they would memorize the following in 15 minutes:

 

 

78 57 10 38 64 60 57 63 68 32 51 47 35 19 74 78 39 86 93 45 68 62 11 91 84 52 74 19 24 24 62 97 97 67 21 3 31 22 53 52 65 38 27 88 2 83 74 86 47 49 47 61 72 83 75 92 60 88 32 75 73 91 55 45 37 9 87 43 78 75 69 17 74 58 35 97 22 34 49 26 97 52 61 66 21 15 38 8 45 19 28 90 19 45 98 63 97 91 25 71 7 93 43 69 88 94 82 73 5 77 70 87 40 53 66 56 85 16 71 20 89 61 13 91 68 76 41 54 89 49 42 46 98 67 69 95 54 42 55 14 22 68 21 3 36 59 66 96 23 78 76 23 72 88 11 35 92 29 9 40 98 24 27 57 67 91 61 73 85 70 20 1 52 45 55 65 56 82 30 3 79 25 67 49 33 26 9 68 95 12 25 61 43 32 65 14 42 48 13 54 30 53 19 53 43 26 54 24 14 46 33 94 69 95 91 30 10 65 72 46 22 81 47 97 98 45 5 13 88 32 95 85 94 42 5 31 95 31 76 77 6 91 43 85 52 45 76 6 55 2 45 27 50 37 76 84 6 13 87 50 25 81 9 76 4 67 53 20 29 35 74 16 47 90 39 54 38 63 48 81 74 52 5 30 91 2 56 73 47 36 49 60 63 5 36 34 68 12 67 20 79 15 52 3 43 83 23 36 63 15 25 70 99 24 37 79 41 97 84 62 61 75 77 51 8 91 3 72 98 35 46 47 16 47 20 4 57 42 14 68 1 47 16 78 74 67 57 53 16 3 99 73 78 33 90 96 42 1 5 80 41 1 9 4 12 12 98 97 63 91 12 94 34 60 78 84 4 18 24 78 54 64 33 86 68 32 16 28 45 71 86 92 43 1 71 61 93 38 64 51 76 76 20 26 55 80 95 73 64 65 22 17 1 59 33 38 10 29 63 57 57 11 71 16 89 74 24 31 16 4 28 78 85 85 49 18 51 97 87 22 85 31 97 14 54 44 68 11 40 61 22 45 58 24 17 26 38 66 60 40 25 21 99 31 47 55 45 6 40 57 62 22 53 6 84 98 72 74 39 59 85 94 95 82 10 91 33 3 68 7 71 43 10 17 67 85 85 64 2 59 7 3 65 32 22 45 76 24 26 96 8 68 48 44 29 76 63 24 51 84 22 87 3 43 5 18 16 67 82 74 91 58 86 97 52 64 52 20 98 33 96 30 87 56 78 38 85 90 18 62 40 67 81 45 44 8 83 71 29 85 63 38 53 51 38 63 2 59 49 1 4 4 87 21 56 37 29 27 24 89 57 27 29 4 21 34 59 53 91 58 53 85 48 90 9 37 31 25 24 14 

 

That is the minimum pass criteria for the text memorization course, and people can achieve that with enough practice. One guy went up to 1000 elements (2000 digits).

 

Remember these are people who have trained their memories, as opposed to being born with it.

 

So that's just the connection skill. People also need to train their encoding and decoding skills when it comes to words.

 

But just from this example of the minimum pass exam. The average page of a book has 250-300 words. As long as they can represent each word as 1 image (thus one element) when encoding. A person can commit to memory 1 page of a book every 15 minutes with 100% accuracy.

 

But it ain't easy. Training your visualization skill and mental ability is a real bitch. You need a mindset like no other. The pass rate for the course itself is only like 1-2%. But I believe there is enough evidence and people who have done it, to prove it is definitely possible, to memorize entire books word for word in a short amount of time.

 

One person who passed became the memory champion of Sweden and is in the top 20 of the world.


Edited by manny, 22 February 2017 - 10:58 AM.

  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1

#131 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 22 February 2017 - 07:51 PM

Its hard to visualise a abstract thing or some name as a single image. Mallow's 3 digit system makes possible to memorize 500  digits in 5 minutes. 3 digit is one word and you put it in memory palace - hard to master it and its only for images, i dont think that in memory championship there is a memorization of text in specific time. Most people use images and palace system to memorize only keywords like 1 word for every line of text - not very useful if its not a poetry but complex scientific text. Anyway any mnemonic system is not close to be an eidetic memory.


  • Ill informed x 1

#132 manny

  • Registered User
  • 264 posts
  • -1
  • Location:UK

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:46 AM

I don't think you know what you're talking about. You train your brain for encoding and decoding words as single images (including abstract words). For example the word "magical" in my mind is a magic hat (magic) which has a mouth on it calling (cal). The magic hat and mouth aren't 2 separate images, they are 1 imaginative image (which should be conjured up by the brain in a second or less). Another example is the state of Tennessee, which in my mind is a sea of tennis rackets. So if we have 3 seconds. You take 1 second to conjure up the image and 2 seconds to connect. Or 2 seconds to conjure the image, and 1 second to make a connection.

 

Like I said, you train your brain for encoding and decoding, just as  you train your visualization skill and connection ability. These are only hard to you or any other normal person, because you haven't trained your mind for it. You saying "Its hard to visualise an abstract thing or some name as a single image." is the same as saying "It's hard to memorize 600 digits in 15 minutes". Of course it's hard for the untrained person; but for the trained person, it's entirely possible. 

 

The memorizing 300 random elements within 15 minutes, where each element represented a 2 digit number (thus 600 digits in total), was just one example of training. In the same software, you have the option to memorize random words. Here's an example of what pops up and you need to memorize within 3 seconds, taken straight out of the text file the software uses:

 

 

astriferous

astrild
astringe
astringency
astringent
astringently
astringer
astroalchemist
astroblast
astrocaryum
astrochemist
astrochemistry
astrochronological
astrocyte
astrocytoma
astrocytomata
astrodiagnosis
astrodome
astrofel
astrogeny
astroglia
astrognosy

 

Now tell me these words aren't abstract enough for you. Yet people train by encoding these and making a connection within 3 seconds. 

 

As for bringing up Mallows 3 digit system, that means nothing. I was only using an example of the standard pass criteria students have to reach for text memorization. Which is 300 elements at 6 seconds an element (most of whom do it at 3 seconds an element). And each element was a figurative code representation of a 2 digit number (0-99). Pmemory also has figurative codes to represent all the 3 digit numbers too (0-1000), and there are people who train hard enough to get down to 2 seconds an element; thus meaning you could memorize 90 digits a minute (450 every 5 minutes). But unless speed is really that important to you, which it would only be if you were competing in memory championships. Then doing 300 elements at 3 seconds an element, would allow you memorize a page of 300 words verbatim, in 15 minutes, should be plenty fast enough.

 

I am not saying this is eidetic memory. What I'm saying is it is entirely possible for normal people to train to a level of memorizing entire books and pages verbatim, in a short period of time.


Edited by manny, 23 February 2017 - 09:55 AM.

  • Off-Topic x 1
  • Disagree x 1

#133 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 23 February 2017 - 09:53 AM

 

Then doing 300 elements at 3 seconds an element, would allow you memorize a page of a 300 words verbatim, in 15 minutes.

 

Genuine eidetic memory like Elizabeth's one could make possible to do it in 1 second or less. I have experimented a lot with mnemonic system and memorized a lot numbers with major system but being fluent in using those mnemonics is not even close to having an eidetic memory. I'm following this topic since 2 years but only if i gonna be 100% sure that eidetic memory code is not possible to be cracked i will focus on mnemonics.


Edited by Grandmaster, 23 February 2017 - 09:55 AM.


#134 manny

  • Registered User
  • 264 posts
  • -1
  • Location:UK

Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:50 AM

Well I hope you crack the code too, as I would love to experience it and use it for studying. The pmemory course/training is notoriously hard, and only 1-2% of people pass to that standard. I was only sharing it, to show people what is currently possible with mnemonics (verbatim text memorization), at high speeds. 

 

Have you had any success thus far, or ideas on what it involves?

 

I'm pretty sure in one of my other topics I was talking about caffeine and vitamin C. And someone said they experienced this phenomenon on really high caffeine doses. But I'll need to look that source up, as this is coming from memory.


Edited by manny, 23 February 2017 - 11:58 AM.


#135 manny

  • Registered User
  • 264 posts
  • -1
  • Location:UK

Posted 23 February 2017 - 11:58 AM

Yes I found it! Here, it's post 20: http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=694497

 

 

Back in my college days I pulled an all nighter using caffeine to stay awake, and at about 1 pm something happened, like a door had opened and suddenly I understood everything I read. I read the entire book on materials science and breezed through the next 2/3rds of the semester based on that one study session. I'll have to try this again one day, and add in the C.

 

Post was by user "Turnbuckle" on this forum, maybe we can contact him to expand on his experience, sounds like eidetic memory to me.


  • Informative x 1

#136 manny

  • Registered User
  • 264 posts
  • -1
  • Location:UK

Posted 23 February 2017 - 03:31 PM

Was looking into an old binaural beats topic, and found another experience on the forum of what sounds like eidetic memory.

 

Post 30 here: http://www.longecity...ts/#entry563265

 

Username: renfr

 

Brainwave entrainment only worked once for me.
It was 1hz BWE mp3, 5 mins after listening I entered into another state of consciousness, to be exact I made my right hemisphere dominant over the left hemisphere, this was an amazing experience. I had the memory of an elephant, really, I could just learn the content of a book and then be able to recite exactly the sentences however my logical thinking was strongly impaired, I had to read twice or thrice to understand sometimes the meaning of a sentence!
This has only worked 2 times in a row, I think picamilon made me able to reach that state. (picamilon alone does nothing but + BWE it seems to have wonderful effects on me).
Also it worked again 1 month after this with another frequency (schumann frequency), this proves me it wasn't just mind and setting or placebo... However this time I had needed no picamilon, weird... but I'm pretty sure picamilon allowed me to enter that state.
I tried again the same mp3 months later but it didn't work, maybe I should buy some picamilon and give it a try.
If BWE works for you then you can truly access instant brain enhancement for free however BWE shoudl be used cautiously if misused it can be very dangerous.
For those who would like to try what gave me those effects : 

 

 

He adds onto his experience in post 38:

 

 

 

Also with my amazing effects I also had side effects :
- impaired hearing, it caused hearing loss as if the volume was turned down (resolved after taking caffeine, I verified this two times)
- zero sex drive, zero erection (resolved 1 week after discontinuation)
- total insomnia (resolved immediatly after discontinuation)
- nose pressure which then ended in a huge runny nose attack (lasted only one day)

I wish we could know how this worked in the brain exactly.

 


Edited by manny, 23 February 2017 - 03:39 PM.

  • Off-Topic x 1
  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1

#137 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 23 February 2017 - 06:19 PM

Yes I found it! Here, it's post 20: http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=694497

 

 

Back in my college days I pulled an all nighter using caffeine to stay awake, and at about 1 pm something happened, like a door had opened and suddenly I understood everything I read. I read the entire book on materials science and breezed through the next 2/3rds of the semester based on that one study session. I'll have to try this again one day, and add in the C.

 

Post was by user "Turnbuckle" on this forum, maybe we can contact him to expand on his experience, sounds like eidetic memory to me.

1.I have dozens of grams of caffeine in tablets so i might try it but we would need more specific info what exact dose he took, also overdosing caffeine might be dangerous(for example Ventricular fibrillation).

 

2. I have this Baroque tune since a year or more on my telephone but it didn't work that well i doubt it would even with picamilon.

 



#138 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:06 AM

Refresh, over a month since last post.


  • like x 1
  • Agree x 1

#139 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 15 April 2017 - 06:13 PM

Now 15 days since my last refresh... no one is really interested in cracking eidetic memory code from this forum beside me and 2-3 more people?



#140 thedarkbobo

  • Registered User
  • 134 posts
  • 20
  • Location:EU

Posted 16 April 2017 - 01:47 PM

Well, nice to find this topic eventually, thanks. There is also huge Lostfalco's thread.

I've gone quickly through last 5 pages, I'd say ok first 2 posts are some point to start with, but we need to go from substance X + Y +Z to pathway A + B + C and I am not very good at this, maybe somebody with medical background can do this.  We can also add the "perfect conditions" for learning - some exercise, not too much stress but also not 0, and enough motivation.

 

I'd skip learning techniques, because we are talking about - see and remember - and not repeat 10 times and remember half.

One interesting note was "If the ability is not nurtured it usually begins to fade after the age of 6, perhaps as growing verbal skills alter the memory process.[4][5]"

This is practiced in quick reading techniques - you have to stop repeating words in your mind, just let it go. This is also the best way I learn when I read but not always possible. Not when fatigued and I have to spell words aloud ;)

 

We do not even fully know what are the mechanisms of action of some nootropics/drugs used and we probably need several actions at the same time and everyone is different so... :)

I also find myself not having enough time/energy to micro manage all this.

 

Some quick info from internet on substances mentioned:

Hydergine (is hard to get and pricy?) /stimulates dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors and blocks alpha-adrenoreceptors/

 

Keppra (levetiracetam) (rather hard to get and pricy); drug binds to a synaptic vesicle glycoprotein, SV2A, and inhibits presynaptic calcium channels reducing neurotransmitter release and acting as a neuromodulator.

 

Pramiracetam - did not exhibit any affinity in vitro for dopaminergic, adrenergic, serotoninergic, GABAergic, muscarinic, adenosine (IC50 > 10 μM), and benzodiazepine receptors (IC50 > 1 μM) binding sites. It may be concluded that the mechanism of action of pramiracetam does not appear to be due to a direct action upon DA and 5-HT neurotransmitter systems or various brain receptors. PR (44 and 88 mg/kg i.p.) caused a significant increase in the rate of sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) into rat hippocampal synptosomes in vitro.

 

Phenylpiracetam - Just like piracetam, phenylpiracetam does work on the acetylcholine and glutamate systems in the brain. Whereas acetylcholine is strongly involved in attention and memory, glutamate is associated with brain excitation and alertness. A variety of other neurotransmitters are also bolstered by phenylpiracetam, including dopamine, which promotes pleasure, motivation and attention, and GABA, which produces relaxation. The increase in GABA action also enhances levels of serotonin, which is linked to feelings of contentment. (on a side not this could be used instead of Hydergine maybe for dopamine)

 

Sunifiram (be careful with dose, half life is typically 30-45 minutes, from my personal use i'd say if you dose this 2-3 days a row then it lasts long) - an ampakine, a compound that interacts with the glutamatergic AMPA receptors to boost the activity of the neurotransmitter glutamine, and as such may deliver significant mood and energy improvement as well as cognitive benefits. Not fully researched and not approved to use on humans but well seems safe in safe dose range.

It's a weak agonist at the glycine site; but, powerfully modulates NMDA channel activity through activation of CaMKII and Src kinase and PKC (alpha) activation).

 

Cocoa -?

 

Centrophenoxine (one that I personally like and would add to any list) - is classified as a cholinergic, a substance that delivers or enhances the action of choline. It’s this cholinergic capability that makes it an efficient and effective nootropic on its own and a powerful potentiator when used in combination with other nootropics, particularly the racetams.

 

Modafinil (took once or twice, but did not need it - have to try again)- The locus of the monoamine action of modafinil was also the target of studies, with effects identified on dopamine in the striatum and, in particular, nucleus accumbens,[45][46]norepinephrine in the hypothalamus and ventrolateral preoptic nucleus,[47][48] and serotonin in the amygdala and frontal cortex.[49] Modafinil was screened at a large panel of receptors and transporters in an attempt to elucidate its pharmacology.[50] Of the sites tested, it was found to significantly affect only on the dopamine transporter (DAT), acting as a dopamine reuptake inhibitor (DRI) with an IC50 value of 4 μM.[50] Subsequently, it was determined that modafinil binds to the same site on the DAT as cocaine, but in a different manner. Against the hypothesis that modafinil exerts its effects by acting as a DRI, tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitors (which deplete dopamine) fail to block the effects of modafinil in animals. (..) As such, although it is established that modafinil is a clinically significant DRI, its full pharmacology remains unclear and may be more complex than this single property (i.e., may also include DAT-independent actions, such as "activation of the orexin system")

 

Aspirin (taking ocasionally) - causes several different effects in the body, mainly the reduction of inflammation, analgesia (relief of pain), the prevention of clotting, and the reduction of fever. Much of this is believed to be due to decreased production of prostaglandins and TXA2. Aspirin's ability to suppress the production of prostaglandins and thromboxanes is due to its irreversible inactivation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme. Cyclooxygenase is required for prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis. Aspirin acts as an acetylating agent where an acetyl group is covalently attached to a serine residue in the active site of the COX enzyme.[1] This makes aspirin different from other NSAIDs (such as diclofenac and ibuprofen), which are reversible inhibitors. However, other effects of aspirin, such as uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, and the modulation of signaling through NF-κB, are also being investigated.

 

Ibudilast (I like this one)- is an anti-inflammatory drug used mainly in Japan, which acts as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, inhibiting the PDE4 subtype to the greatest extent,[1] but also showing significant inhibition of other PDE subtypes.[2][3] Ibudilast has bronchodilator, vasodilator[4] and neuroprotective effects,[5][6] and is mainly used in the treatment of asthma and stroke.[7] It inhibits platelet aggregation,[8] and may also be useful in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

 

PRL-8-53 *(for me it did not provide any learning boost but better recall of past memories, might be placebo) - The exact mechanism of action of PRL-8-53 remains unknown. Doses up to 200 mg/kg are not observed to have stimulant properties, and a dosage of 20 mg/kg does not potentiate the effects of dextroamphetamine in rats.[1] It displays possible cholinergic properties, and potentiates dopamine while partially inhibiting serotonin. PRL-8-53 reverses the catatonic and ptotic effects of reserpine.

 

Nicotine (just bought 2 sets of nicotine gum) - Nicotine acts as a receptor agonist at most nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs),[4][5] except at two nicotinic receptor subunits (nAChRα9 and nAChRα10) where it acts as an receptor antagonist. Nicotine is highly addictive. Nicotine is frequently used for its performance-enhancing effects on cognition, alertness, and focus.[38] A meta-analysis of 41 double-blind, placebo-controlled studies concluded that nicotine or smoking had significant positive effects on aspects of fine motor abilities, alerting and orienting attention, and episodic and working memory.[39] A 2015 review noted that stimulation of the α4β2 nicotinic receptor is responsible for certain improvements in attentional performance;[40] among the nicotinic receptor subtypes, nicotine has the highest binding affinity at the α4β2 receptor (ki=1 nM), which is also the biological target that mediates nicotine's addictive properties.

 

Galantamine (didn't work well for me - I was feeling unwell after this) - is a potent allosteric potentiating ligand of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α4β2, α7/5-HT3, α3β4, and α6β4 in certain areas of the brain, as well as a weak competitive and reversible cholinesterase inhibitor in all areas of the body.[15] It increases the concentration and thereby action of acetylcholine in certain parts of the brain. It has shown activity in modulating the nicotinic cholinergic receptors on cholinergic neurons to increase acetylcholine release.

 

Tadalafil (mentioned by Lostfalco) -  is a PDE5 inhibitor marketed in pill form for treating erectile dysfunction (ED).  half-life (17.5 hours) compared to sildenafil and vardenafil (both 4–5 hours). These drugs also inhibit other PDE enzymes. Sildenafil and vardenafil inhibit PDE6, an enzyme found in the eye, more than tadalafil.[9] Some sildenafil users see a bluish tinge and have a heightened sensitivity to light because of PDE6 inhibition.[10] Sildenafil and vardenafil also inhibit PDE1 more than tadalafil.[9] PDE1 is found in the brain, heart, and vascular smooth muscle.[9] It is thought that the inhibition of PDE1 by sildenafil and vardenafil leads to vasodilation, flushing, and tachycardia.[9] Tadalafil inhibits PDE11 more than sildenafil or vardenafil.[9] PDE11 is expressed in skeletal muscle, the prostate, the liver, the kidney, the pituitary gland, and the testes.[9] The effects on the body of inhibiting PDE11 are not known. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) enhances erectile function by increasing the amount of cGMP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a cyclic nucleotide derived from guanosine triphosphate (GTP). cGMP acts as a second messenger much like cyclic AMP. Its most likely mechanism of action is activation of intracellular protein kinases in response to the binding of membrane-impermeable peptide hormones to the external cell surface. cGMP is a secondary messenger in phototransduction in the eye. In the photoreceptors of the mammalian eye, the presence of light activates phosphodiesterase, which degrades cGMP. The sodium ion channels in photoreceptors are cGMP-gated, so degradation of cGMP causes sodium channels to close, which leads to the hyperpolarization of the photoreceptor's plasma membrane and ultimately to visual information being sent to the brain.

 

Noopept - modulates the acetylcholine system as well as the AMPA receptors. (not really know mechanism)

Vinpocetine - (I was looking for something active on sodium channels, but realized later that Sunifiram is probably doing this and so does Nefiracetam)
  • Neuroprotective against a wide array of neurotoxic chemicals – through inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels and reduction of calcium-influx into neuronal cells[1]
  • Anti-inflammatory activity – reduces TNFα-induced expression of pro-inflammatory molecules[2]
  • Cerebral vasodilation through phosphodiesterase (PDE) type-1 inhibition – increased blood flow in the brain[3]
  • Improved brain metabolism due to increased glucose availability – leading to increased neuronal ATP
  • Upregulates acetylcholine, noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine receptors

Voltage-gated sodium channels, which are responsible for the generation of action potentials in the brain, are phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in purified form. Activation of PKC decreases peak sodium current up to 80 percent and slows its inactivation for sodium channels in rat brain neurons and for rat brain type IIA sodium channel alpha subunits heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. These effects are specific for PKC because they can be blocked by specific peptide inhibitors of PKC and can be reproduced by direct application of PKC to the cytoplasmic surface of sodium channels in excised inside-out membrane patches. Modulation of brain sodium channels by PKC is likely to have important effects on signal transduction and synaptic transmission in the central nervous system.

 

 

So if you ask me I'd try with something like (I've put an X for those that I have tried and bold those that I use frequently):

Grapefruit juice (because its good :) ) X

Aspirin/Ibudilast X

Centrophenoxine  X

Modafinil  X

Levetiracetam

Phenylpiracetam

Sunifiram  X or I guess Oxiracetam X

Nicotine

NSI-189 X

Tadalafil (I'd really like some of this cheap :( )

 

(now talk about the risk...I'd probably go for it but don't have Phenylpiracetam, Levetiracetam, Tadalafil)

 

 



#141 Un chien andalou

  • Registered User
  • 35 posts
  • 7
  • Location:Italy

Posted 16 April 2017 - 07:54 PM

You probably already seen this, but I wrote a comprehensive article on photographic memory on my blog but mods have deleted the link because they thought I was spamming (meh).
 

 

In case you haven't, have a look at it, I put all the most interesting nootropics and mnemonic techniques I've found in my research: Photographic Memory How-To: Nootropics and Mnemonic Techniques


Edited by Un chien andalou, 16 April 2017 - 08:02 PM.


#142 Un chien andalou

  • Registered User
  • 35 posts
  • 7
  • Location:Italy

Posted 16 April 2017 - 07:58 PM

In my experience donepezil+nicergoline+coluracetam+prl-8-53 is the closest thing to photographic memory you can possibly achieve. I've also had greats results with donepezil+nicergoline+selegiline+NSI-189.

 

The two most important nootropic of them all are donepezil and nicergoline, when combined the memory boosting effects is just unreal. PRL-8-53+Coluracetam stack come second.

 

Methylphenidate is also a powerful eidetic nootropic when combined with mnemonic techniques, though you should only really use it to learn totally new material:

 

 

 

Methylphenidate had significant effects on performance of the tests of spatial working memory and planning but not on the attentional and fluency tests. When the drug was taken on the first test session, performance on the spatial tests was enhanced by the drug compared to placebo. However, when the drug was taken second, performance accuracy was impaired whereas response latencies were decreased. These results are consistent with a hypothesis that methylphenidate influences performance in two conflicting ways; enhancing executive aspects of spatial function on novel tasks but impairing previously established performance. This pattern of effects is discussed within the framework of dual, interacting arousal mechanisms.

 

https://link.springe...7/s002130050284


Edited by Un chien andalou, 16 April 2017 - 08:02 PM.


#143 Grandmaster

  • Registered User
  • 81 posts
  • 4
  • Location:Poland

Posted 16 April 2017 - 08:33 PM

Both prl 8-53 and coluracetam gave me terrible brainfog and hyperthermia so im not going to try using some more dangerous nootropics since i wasted money on few of them and need to regulate my neurotransmitters(possible dopamine deficency). Dopenezil is a tested drug and it works with small doses(5-10mg), is it possible to get it in Europe without prescription?



sponsored ad

  • Advert

#144 thedarkbobo

  • Registered User
  • 134 posts
  • 20
  • Location:EU

Posted 16 April 2017 - 10:03 PM

Donepezil binds and reversibly inactivates the cholinesterases, thus inhibiting hydrolysis of acetylcholine. This results in an increased acetylcholine concentrations at cholinergic synapses.

In addition to its actions as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil has been found to act as a potent agonist of the σ1 receptor (Ki = 14.6 nM), and has been shown to produce specific antiamnestic effects in animals mainly via this action

 

I would like to find all similar substances....so we can group them...and exclude what is not working at all..or find best price/safety/effort/half life ones.

 

For one we want to work on acetylcholine pathways it seems, most of racetams will do(mentioned earlier and some other). Unless the effect is somehow potentiated via σ1 receptor.

 

/The sigma-1 receptor (σ1R), one of two sigma receptor subtypes, is a chaperone protein at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that modulates calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor./ Short list from wiki:

Agonists:

Some more digging...Methylphenylpiracetam is a derivative of piracetam and a positive allosteric modulator of the sigma-1 receptor Methylphenylpiracetam is a derivative of piracetam and a positive allosteric modulator of the sigma-1 receptor (maybe this would be enough?)

Other:

cocaine, DMT, DXM, fluvoxamine, ibogaine, opipramol, PCP

Oh well...

 

Selegiline, also known as L-deprenyl, is a substituted phenethylamine.

 

Selegiline is a selective inhibitor of MAO-B; MAO-B metabolizes dopamine and phenylethylamine.

Selegiline also inhibits CYP2A6 and can increase the effects of nicotine as a result.[18] Selegiline appears to activate σ1 receptors with a relatively high affinity of approximately 400 nM.

So maybe σ1 receptors activity is a good target? Got to find some OTC source to EU for one of those...

 

Methylphenidate looks interesting, I would rather not use it though...and stay away from dopamine/serotonin pathways.

 

Pharmacological texts describe methylphenidate as a stimulant with effects, addiction liability, and dependence liability similar to the amphetamine, a compound with moderate liability among addictive drugs;[73][74] accordingly, addiction and psychological dependence are possible and likely when methylphenidate is used at high doses as a recreational drug.[

Methylphenidate has the potential to induce euphoria due to its pharmacodynamic effect (i.e., dopamine reuptake inhibition) in the brain's reward system.

 

Methylphenidate binds to and blocks dopamine transporters and norepinephrine transporters.[99] Variability exists between DAT blockade, and extracellular dopamine, leading to the hypothesis that methylphenidate amplifies basal dopamine activity, leading to nonresponse in those with low basal DA activity.

List from wiki:

 

 

 

 

Edited by thedarkbobo, 16 April 2017 - 10:21 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: eidetic, photographic, memory

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users