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Effects of resveratrol and exercise in middle-aged mice

resveratrol in vivo

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#1 malbecman

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 03:44 PM


Still looks to be something going on there......

 

 

Molecules. 2016 May 18;21(5). pii: E661. doi: 10.3390/molecules21050661.

Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation and Exercise Training on Exercise Performance in Middle-Aged Mice.
Abstract

Resveratrol (RES) has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antidiabetic, antiasthmatic, antalgic, and anti-fatigue activities. Exercise training (ET) improves frailty resulting from aging. This study evaluated the effects of a combination of RES supplementation and ET on the exercise performance of aged mice. C57BL/6J mice (16 months old) were randomly divided into four groups: an older control group (OC group), supplementation with RES group (RES group), ET group (ET group), and a combination of ET and RES supplementation group (ET+RES group). Other 10-week-old mice were used as a young control group (Y-Ctrl group). In this study, exercise performance was evaluated using forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time, as well as levels of plasma lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after an acute swimming exercise. Our results showed that the forelimb grip strength of mice in the ET+RES group was significantly higher than those in the OC, RES, and ET groups (by 1.3-, 1.2-, and 1.1-fold, respectively, p < 0.05), and exhibited no difference with the Y-Ctrl group. The endurance swimming test showed that swimming times of the ET and ET+RES groups were significantly longer than those of the OC and RES groups. Moreover, plasma lactate and ammonia levels of the ET + RES group after acute swimming exercise were significantly lower compared to the OC group (p < 0.05). Thus, it was suggested that by combining RES supplementation with ET for 4 weeks, the muscle strength and endurance performance of aged mice were significantly improved compared to the single intervention with either RES or ET alone. This combination might help shorten the extent of deterioration accompanying the aging process. 

KEYWORDS: 

anti-fatigue; exercise performance; resveratrol

PMID:   27213310

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#2 normalizing

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 03:42 AM

so is resveratrol good or bad with exercise? im still confused as i read quite the opposite few times now. HELP! someone please check the sponsor of this study!!!



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#3 maxwatt

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 03:50 AM

Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation and Exercise Training on Exercise Performance in Middle-Aged Mice.

Author information
  • 1Center for Liberal Arts, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan. kevinkan@tmu.edu.tw.
  • 2Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250 Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Township, Taoyuan County 33301, Taiwan. kilmur23@ntsu.edu.tw.
  • 3Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250 Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Township, Taoyuan County 33301, Taiwan. 1021301@ntsu.edu.tw.
  • 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan. 1021301@ntsu.edu.tw.
  • 5School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City 11031, Taiwan. 1021301@ntsu.edu.tw.
  • 6Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250 Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Township, Taoyuan County 33301, Taiwan. magicpica521@gmail.com.
  • 7Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250 Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Township, Taoyuan County 33301, Taiwan. 1010206@ntsu.edu.tw.
  • 8Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250 Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Township, Taoyuan County 33301, Taiwan. peggytung@ntsu.edu.tw.
  • 9Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, 250 Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Township, Taoyuan County 33301, Taiwan. john5523@ntsu.edu.tw.

 

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan, the successor to the National Science Council (grant no. NSC102-2628-H179-001-MY2 to Chi-Chang Huang). The authors are grateful to Chien-Chao Chiu and Hsiao-Li Chuang for their technical assistance in animal experiments.
Author Contributions
Nai-Wen Kan, Yu-Tang Tung, and Chi-Chang Huang designed the experiments. Chin-Shan Ho, Yen-Shuo Chiu, Wen-Ching Huang, and Pei-Yu Chen carried out the laboratory experiments. Nai-Wen Kan, Chin-Shan Ho, and Chi-Chang Huang contributed reagents, materials, and analysis platforms. Nai-Wen Kan, Chin-Shan Ho, Yu-Tang Tung, and Chi-Chang Huang analyzed the data, interpreted the results, prepared figures, and wrote the manuscript. Nai-Wen Kan, Yu-Tang Tung, and Chi-Chang Huang revised the manuscript.
Conflicts of Interest
The authors declare no conflict of interest.

 


Edited by maxwatt, 06 June 2016 - 03:53 AM.

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#4 normalizing

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Posted 06 June 2016 - 09:10 AM

with such names as chang cheng ping pong etc. it was hard for me to google and find what each one of those people gets out of this study, so ill say i guess they dont work for any resveratrol producing company? we shall see in later studies.


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#5 Vlad Bondarenko

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 03:02 PM

so is resveratrol good or bad with exercise? im still confused as i read quite the opposite few times now. HELP! someone please check the sponsor of this study!!!

From what I understand, Resveratrol combined with exercise increased the muscle endurance and strength of the mice. This increased endurance and strength seems to lessen the "side-effects" of aging. 

 

OP: The links are broken.

 

I somewhat cannot agree with this (as much as I want to), because exercise in general will increase performance and endurance of muscles, so reservatrol might only increase help this further.


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#6 normalizing

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 03:20 AM

what about resveratrol and fasting?



#7 QQQ

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 07:00 PM

with such names as chang cheng ping pong etc. it was hard for me to google and find what each one of those people gets out of this study, so ill say i guess they dont work for any resveratrol producing company? we shall see in later studies.

 

That's a shame because you seem really intelligent


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#8 Daniscience

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Posted 29 July 2016 - 05:06 PM

what about resveratrol and fasting?

 

Yeah I am interested on this, I usually fast following a 20/4 protocol and I lift weights and a bit of cardio on the latest hours of my fasting.



#9 Michael

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 05:13 PM

This is an animal study.  PMID 23878368 finds that resveratrol blocks many of the beneficial adaptive responses to exercise in humans.


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#10 malbecman

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 06:04 PM

 This certainly sounds positive and its in vivo, at a reasonable dose, and in humans for once:

 

 

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 May 13. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glx089. [Epub ahead of print]

Resveratrol enhances exercise-induced cellular and functional adaptations of skeletal muscle in older men and women.
Abstract

Older men (n = 12) and women (n = 18) 65-80 years of age completed 12 weeks of exercise and took either a placebo or resveratrol (500 mg/d) to test the hypothesis that resveratrol treatment combined with exercise would increase mitochondrial density, muscle fatigue resistance and cardiovascular function more than exercise alone. Contrary to our hypothesis, aerobic and resistance exercise coupled with resveratrol treatment did not reduce cardiovascular risk further than exercise alone. However, exercise added to resveratrol treatment improved the indices of mitochondrial density, and muscle fatigue resistance more than placebo and exercise treatments. In addition, subjects that were treated with resveratrol had an increase in knee extensor muscle peak torque (8%), average peak torque (14%) and power (14%) after training, whereas exercise did not increase these parameters in the placebo treated older subjects. Furthermore, exercise combined with resveratrol significantly improved mean fiber area and total myonuclei by 45.3% and 20%, respectively, in muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of older subjects. Together, these data indicate a novel anabolic role of resveratrol in exercise-induced adaptations of older persons and this suggests that resveratrol combined with exercise might provide a better approach for reversing sarcopenia than exercise alone.

© The Author 2017.


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#11 maxwatt

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 11:21 PM

I am suspicious of the exercise regimen in PMID 23878368

All subjects performed 8 weeks of supervised high-intensity interval training (cycle ergometer) twice a week and full body circuit training (Crossfit) once a week. Intensity of the training sessions was controlled with TEAM2 WearLink+ (Polar, Kempele, Finland) heart rate monitors. In addition subjects conducted a timed 5 km walk once a week.

 

The subjects were "exercise naive", and the exercise routine is one that most actual athletes would consider barely a warmup.

An unpublished study by a USCF cycling coach on himself and two of his cyclists found a slight improvement in the fourth block (1 month period) of structured training.  the dose was 400 mg vs the 250 mg in PMID 23878368.  The improvement noted was that normally after 3 training blocks, performance would plateau and diminish, as it had many times with the same and many other subjects.  With resveratrol, training continued to improve as measured by power output and oxygen consumption, as if the subjects had had a two week rest period.

 

I know an unpublished study doesn't prove much, but the difference in dose is significant, as is the fact of starting with trained, conditioned athletes. 

 

For most of us this is irrelevant and not a reason to take resveratrol, but I am curious at the different findings.

 

The paper malbecman posted above (I merged into this topic) shows an improvement in aged subjects.  I note the dose in that study was 500 mg. 

 

More studies?


Edited by maxwatt, 22 May 2017 - 11:35 PM.

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#12 Michael

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 03:16 AM

An unpublished study by a USCF cycling coach on himself and two of his cyclists found a slight improvement in the fourth block (1 month period) of structured training.  the dose was 400 mg vs the 250 mg in PMID 23878368.  The improvement noted was that normally after 3 training blocks, performance would plateau and diminish, as it had many times with the same and many other subjects.  With resveratrol, training continued to improve as measured by power output and oxygen consumption, as if the subjects had had a two week rest period. 

 

Three subjects ... unblinded ... no control ...

[To the tune of "Tequila"}: Namma-namma-na-na-na ... Placebo!
 


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#13 maxwatt

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 01:34 AM

In this case I don't think so.  As their coach, he was monitoring the athletes' training, and measured performance improvement beyond what the athletes should have been capable of at that point in their training.  So(they being cyclists and all) he grilled them: What are you guys on?  The answer was resveratrol, it was legal,  so he tried it on himself , not expecting much, and continued monitoring his clients.  There are other studies with better controls that have been mentioned here in this subforum, by malbecman for one.  He periodically  posts resveratrol studies..  In my admitedly less than rigorous reading, what seems to be critical is the dose.  Less than 400 mg there is no, or negative, effect.  More than 400 mg, improvement.  This does call for some kind of meta-analysis beyond my off-key rendition of Tequila.   It may have to do with PPAR activation,  someone may eventually look into it.

 

Telmisartan activates PPAR-delta, acting as an exercise mimetic and has been banned from sport for that reason.

 

Here's a possible clue https://www.hindawi..../2010/129173/  http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/129173

"Under hypoxia, Resveratrol induced SIRT1, RXR-α, PPAR-α mRNA, and PPAR-γ and UCP-2 protein. "

 

I believe resveratrol is not what it was cracked up to be, but it is not inert.  Though the relevance to life-extension is problematical.


Edited by maxwatt, 24 May 2017 - 01:36 AM.

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#14 MikeDC

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 08:21 PM

Reaveratrol is probably effective enough to generate some noise. Even Sinclair has abandoned it. He is into NAD+ precursor now.
This time he hit jackpot.
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#15 SearchHorizon

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 06:46 AM

I tried various forms of RES, in different dosages. Except at the smallest dosages, I had bowel problems (despite having tried micronized form, etc.).

 

My conclusion was that RES is basically toxic. Remember that SRIT1 is a stress-response gene. It would make sense that the RES would cause SIRT1 to be activated simply because it has hypoxic effect on cells.

 

One more issue I had with RES was that I had no idea how much SIRT1 activation I was getting. Based many studies on stress, we know that chronic stress is a bad thing. This also would imply that SIRT1 should NOT be activated all the time. If one were to take a reasonable dose of RES, perhaps one can achieve an optimal activation of SRIT1 (without overdoing it). As one poster noted above, this would explain the positive effect of RES in some studies.

 

Any activation of SIRT1 by the use of chemical compounds (such as RES) can also be achieved through exercise and/or fasting. I don't see any reason to take RES.

 







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