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No Beneficial Effects of Resveratrol on the Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

resveratrol

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#1 Jim Morrison

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:26 PM


Abstract
 Context: 

Low-grade inflammation is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Preclinical evidence suggests that resveratrol (RSV) has beneficial metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects that could have therapeutic implications.

 Objective: 

To investigate effects of long-term RSV treatment on inflammation and MetS.

 Setting and Design: 

A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group clinical trial conducted at Aarhus University Hospital.

 Participants: 

Middle-aged community-dwelling men (N = 74) with MetS, 66 of whom completed all visits (mean ± standard error of the mean): age, 49.5 ± 0.796 years; body mass index, 33.8 ± 0.44 kg/m2; waist circumference, 115 ± 1.14 cm.

 Intervention: 

Daily oral supplementation with 1000 mg RSV (RSVhigh), 150 mg RSV, or placebo for 16 weeks.

Main outcome measures:

Plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), circulating lipids, and inflammatory markers in circulation and adipose/muscle tissue biopsy specimens; glucose metabolism; and body composition including visceral fat and ectopic fat deposition.

Results:

RSV treatment did not lower circulating levels of hs-CRP, interleukin 6, or soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in plasma, and inflammatory gene expression in adipose and muscle tissues also remained unchanged. RSV treatment had no effect on blood pressure, body composition, and lipid deposition in the liver or striated muscle. RSV treatment had no beneficial effect on glucose or lipid metabolism. RSVhigh treatment significantly increased total cholesterol (P < 0.002), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P < 0.006), and fructosamine (P < 0.013) levels compared with placebo.

Conclusion:

RSV treatment did not improve inflammatory status, glucose homeostasis, blood pressure, or hepatic lipid content in middle-aged men with MetS. On the contrary, RSVhigh significantly increased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and fructosamine levels compared with placebo.


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#2 MikeDC

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:39 PM

Amazing. Dr. Brenner said last year that Resveratrol does nothing. He was off a little since this clinical trial has proven Resveratrol is worse than nothing. Here is a new article from life extension magazine and they are scaling back Resveratrol and pushing NAD+ precursors.

 

http://www.lifeexten...rotocol/Page-01


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#3 Skyguy2005

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 01:11 PM

Amazing. Dr. Brenner said last year that Resveratrol does nothing. He was off a little since this clinical trial has proven Resveratrol is worse than nothing.

 

Why? Rapamycin raises LDL and total cholesterol as well.

 

Maybe it's not all powerful, or as good as rapamycin or whatever else, but really did he say that? Only an idiot would say it "does nothing".


Edited by Skyguy2005, 25 September 2017 - 01:16 PM.


#4 MikeDC

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 02:35 PM

I think the context was anti aging. Resveratrol is very contraveral. Studies say it is great. Clinical trial didn't work. Glaxo bought the Resveratrol mimics and stopped the development because they can't reproduce the results.

Pterostilbene also has limited health benefit as well.
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#5 maxwatt

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 01:41 AM

Whatever new supplement comes along, you should hurry up and use it while it still works.


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#6 MikeDC

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 01:49 AM

I don't trust and don't take any supplements that is not natural in our body. I take Niagen and Ubiquinol. Both exist in our body and don't cause side effects at reasonable doses.
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#7 bluemoon

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 08:11 PM

 

 

Maybe it's not all powerful, or as good as rapamycin or whatever else, but really did he say that? Only an idiot would say it "does nothing".

 

 

I was there at Brenner's talk at UW-Madison last December, and he said resveratrol did nothing and emphasized that with a picture of someone throwing resveratrol into a garbage can. The audience of mostly bio/chemists laughed, except me, who was skeptical. At the end, Brenner also doubted if pterostilbine did anything but not as strongly as against resveratrol. Weeks later a study showed 50 mg of resveratrol increased the effectiveness of ACE inhibitors by 20 percent.

 

The talk was video taped but never made public as the U of Iowa told Bryan_S that it would be. 


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#8 MikeDC

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 09:22 PM

Almost all the Resveratrol studies are good. But clinical trial results are not that great.
Glaxo didn't throw away their almost $1 Billion investment in Resveratrol analog because they feel like it.
It doesn't work on humans.

Edited by MikeDC, 01 October 2017 - 09:24 PM.

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