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Dietary Carbohydrates Impair Healthspan and Promote Mortality

carbohydrate mortality longevity

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#1 Chupo

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 01:09 AM


 

The prospective cohort study, named PURE, found that in >135,000 participants from 18 countries, nutritive carbohydrates increase human mortality, whereas dietary fat reduces it, requesting a fundamental change of current nutritional guidelines. Experimental evidence from animal models provides synergizing mechanistic concepts as well as pharmacological options to mimic low-carb or ketogenic diets.

 

Screenshot_20171006_210536.png

Figure 1

Factors, Modulators, and Executers of Carbohydrate-Mediated Healthspan Regulation

(A) Physiological and environmental factors that may regulate healthspan in relation to carbohydrate uptake or glucose catabolism.

(B) Therapeutic modulators of the individual factors depicted above.

© Selected mechanistic regulators that cumulatively mediate the downstream execution of (A) and (B), respectively.

 

Full Text: http://www.cell.com/...4131(17)30562-4

 


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#2 Darryl

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 07:27 PM

When considering the lower total income, income inequality, and health outcome disparities in countries that participated in PURE, one could also make the case that its result may be seriously confounded by socioeconomic status.

 

There's also the issue of the typical carbs consumed in those countries. They're consuming refined flour bread, white rice, cornmeal, and increasingly even in rural areas, sugar sweetened beverages and candy. No serious researcher has made a case for refined higher-GI starches and fructose-containing sugar, and no serious researcher can deny the huge volume of evidence favoring whole grain and legume consumption. Again, there's real peril in reducing the diverse effects of different carbohydrates to a single category.


Edited by Darryl, 07 October 2017 - 07:29 PM.

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#3 Chupo

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 08:24 PM

When considering the lower total income, income inequality, and health outcome disparities in countries that participated in PURE, one could also make the case that its result may be seriously confounded by socioeconomic status.

 

 

 

Except that the association held up in both Western and Asian countries and after it was controlled for.

 

 

"Higher carbohydrate intake was associated with higher risk of total mortality in both Asian countries and non-Asian countries (figure 2A). Conversely, higher intake of total fat and individual types of fat were each associated with lower total mortality risk in Asian countries and non-Asian countries"

 

gr2.gif

 

http://www.thelancet...2252-3/fulltext

 

There's also the issue of the typical carbs consumed in those countries. They're consuming refined flour bread, white rice, cornmeal, and increasingly even in rural areas, sugar sweetened beverages and candy. No serious researcher has made a case for refined higher-GI starches and fructose-containing sugar, and no serious researcher can deny the huge volume of evidence favoring whole grain and legume consumption. Again, there's real peril in reducing the diverse effects of different carbohydrates to a single category.

 

Not classifying the different carbs, was a major limitation of this study. There needs to be a re-analysis with this info.


Edited by Chupo, 07 October 2017 - 08:30 PM.

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#4 albedo

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 12:59 PM

Wow, its an impressive study Chupo you have found. Have put it in my to read list when I can have access. Yes there are limitations as Darryl points out but I am impressed. I also think carbohydrates differentiation should be done (I would be even more impressed if a metabolomic stratification would be introduced, that would be much more sensitive). Also, population span might smooth genetics, I wonder if the work has something to say on this and epigenetics. Will check it out. Thank you for having shared it.



#5 prophets

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 01:30 PM

I'd really like to see a comparative study of db/db mice and humans on various individual and maybe combination interventions that address excessive glucose with metformin (gluconeogenesis), acarbose (starch digestion inhibitor), SGLT-2 (excrete glucose via urine), and the Valter Longo FMD protocol.

 

Regardless of your viewpoint on carbs, I think this study adds to case in favor of MUFAs (Q5 vs. Q1 = 0.74 HR), with maybe the best p-value (0.0065) among comparative cohorts.


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#6 prophets

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 10:51 PM

Here is a link to another aspect of the PURE study looking at vegetable, fruit, legume intake, and their associations with various mortality outcomes (stroke, myocardial etc.).  This paper was the first one published, before carbohydrate paper above.

 

I don't have the time to exhaustively dissect this paper, but it seems that they highlight that:

 

  • Raw vegetables have a statistically significant inverse correlation with mortality events, while cooked vegetables do not appear to have the same level of significance (Table 3, 4). 
  • Legumes seem to have a powerful reduction in all cause mortality (cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular).
  • Benefits of vegetable, fruit, legume intake were found lower in 3-4 servings per day or 375-500 grams per day, with limited benefits thereafter

 

There is a small podcast discussing the outcome.

 


Edited by prophets, 05 November 2017 - 11:02 PM.

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#7 dazed1

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 09:25 AM

Anyone who thinks that carbs from veggies/fruits are bad for you (if you are not diabetic/prediabetic) then he does not belong to this forum


Edited by dazed1, 10 November 2017 - 09:25 AM.

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#8 jack black

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 07:40 PM


  • Legumes seem to have a powerful reduction in all cause mortality (cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular).

 

Very interesting. I noticed that since I started eating only vegetables for lunch, the days on which some sort of legumes are served, I have a noticeable increased sense of well-being (both physical and psychical) in the afternoon. of course i always take a capsule of beeno on those days.

Has anyone noticed anything like that?







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