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Glycation question

glycation

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#1 Qowpel

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 02:20 AM


Hi everyone. As I understand, we can take antiglyvation substances to limit formation of glycation in the body, such as say, benfotiamine. However, is it possible at all to have any impact on the ingestion of Exogenous glycation end products? For example, let us say you ingested x amount of sugar which creates y amount of endogeneous advanced glycation end products in the body, yielding Z amount of damage. In comparison, let us say you also ate a portion of grilled meat, whose exogenous glycation end products, upon ingestion, caused the same exact net amount of damage the endogenous glycation end products did, Y, amount.

We know, again, we could take glycation inhibitors to lessen the formation of endogenous glycation end products and their formation. However, do glycation inhibitors, or anything else, have any effect on somehow inhibiting Exogeneous glycation end products?

#2 Nate-2004

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 02:05 PM

I don't think they do, the crosslinks are already formed from what I understand. I don't even know to what degree these supposed "blockers" like benfotiamine, carnosine, rosmarinic acid and others really block AGEs. They're not well studied, especially not in vivo. 



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#3 OP2040

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 03:42 PM

Bump...

 

I suppose inhibiting glycation is a place to start though.  For that, I am a fan of Rosmarinic Acid as it seems to be a very strong inhibitor with other health benefits as well.

 

I am absolutely confused about the dietary AGE's thing.  I think it may be similar to the cholesterol fiasco.  In other words, it is part of the puzzle, but at the end of the day dietary AGE's don't equate to In Vivo AGE's.  There are just too many discrepancies with that theory.  The list of dietary Age's consists of mostly healthy foods, many of which are known to be anti-aging in themselves.  It had me thinking about stir fry a lot, as I do this at least once a week. And if ever there was an AGE-generator it should be that method of cooking.  Yet, Asian cultures have some of the highest life expectancies in the world.



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#4 OP2040

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 04:00 PM

I have another example, but it's in graph format so I'll just describe.  Apparently Parmesan cheese has many times more AGE's than other types of cheese.  Well, Aged cheeses like that are a huge part of the med diet, and known to be a big part of the healthy part of that diet (spermidine).  So are the AGE's really all that important?  I'm sure I could come up with many more examples.

 

Just to be fair, one counter-example is the attribution of many health problems of the American South is attributed to the outdoor grilling culture.  But this is a hypothesis, I'm not sure it's been proven even epidemiologically.

 

If dietary AGE's are a problem, then it seems like soups and stews would be the best way to go.







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