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Pets and NAD+

nmn nad+ cats

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16 replies to this topic

#1 Mind

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Posted 07 May 2018 - 09:16 PM


Just wondering if anyone here has given NR or NMN to their pets.

 

Yes, I have another old cat that is getting close to the end. I am always willing to try something to make them feel a bit better or help them survive in better health for the last few months.

 

I was thinking about boosting NAD+, see what happens. I asked my vet about it. Her only concern was kidney issues. Pablo (my old cat), has a low functioning kidney. Will NMN or NR put extra strain on his kidneys.



#2 MikeDC

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 02:18 PM

No, they can actually improve kidney functions. One person posted that his cat got great effects from NR for a while and then stopped working. You might want to consider NR+Taurine to deal with the negative feed back loop.

The feed back loop maybe more profound for older people and animals.


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#3 theone

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 03:05 PM

My 7 year old Husky is taking 90mg of NR 4 times per week. No negative side effects to report.


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#4 Oakman

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 03:14 PM

I'm the one who gave my cat NR. As was mentioned, it seemed to do wonders, until it didn't.  You know cats, they are near death one day, and back on their feet the next, sort of. We thought we were going to lose ours last winter, but miracles of miracles, she is still with us, even given her frailty. Her main problem has been her autoimmune condition (raw skin caused by scratching, for which she received transdermal  prednisolone 10% cream in her ear twice daily, and shots of something more powerful every 2-3 months or so. That keeps that at bay pretty well. However, her arthritis has developed in the last year (bad front limp) and cat chondroitin and glucosamine don't seem to help.  So when it's appears really bad, she get buccal Buprenorphine for pain.

 

The NR seemed to help a lot initially with everything for about 6-9 months. I had difficulties trying to decide the best dose, as there are no references for this, the vet didn't have a clue, and so it was trial and error. Cat's need B3, the amounts is very small, and of course, NR is not what is specified. Humans take a lot more NR that is needed of a B3 as well. So I started with approx 50mg NR (excluding filler) in food and eventually reduced to approx 15mg. Day and evening dosing worked best, not morning for some reason... because of throwing up in the morning if dosed then  She does this regularly anyway for almost any reason... to much food, wrong food, medicine in her food, you probably know how that goes with cats!

 

Currently, no NR, glucosamine or chondroitin, rather a tiny amt of UltraCur curcumin (protein attached curcumin) in her food, doesn't seem to bother her and may help with inflammation and general health. Cats are a mystery in so many ways, just like us! Good luck and let us know if you come up with any effective treatments with NMN, NR, or anything else.


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#5 Mind

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 03:44 PM

Thanks for the ideas.

 

I guess, I would expect a little health and energy boost for a bit, but since he is old, "aging" will probably make it less effective over time.

 

I will let you know if I treat Pablo.


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#6 sthira

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 03:52 PM

Cats are a mystery in so many ways...


Ha! Mine can stand on the floor, look at me, then nonchalantly leap to the refrigerator top. Six feet up? I envy her vertical leap, her wide green eyes, her vacancy.

I've given her months of home brews featuring c60 in olive oil mixed into her dry food kernels, and she seems no better or worse for these strange interventions. She can't leap seven feet after dumbly eating c60, that is.

I'd try NR on her except the price of one bottle is worth more than she's worth. I love her, of course, but I can pick up another version of her off the streets for free, minus spade costs.

My mom has had 20 cats for more than 20 years. She loves all of them, and she grieves for each little death; but then she just gets another cat, another replacement, and she hangs a framed photo of the currently grieved in a huge gallery of past beloved cats. One day this'll be my inheritance -- framed photos of dead cats.
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#7 mrwhitee

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 03:25 AM

Shouldn't you dose the cat based on what was given to the mice and adjust for weight. A cat is just a bigger mouse ;) . I want to try it on my cat and see if her blood work gets any better on her kidney values.



#8 hd98

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 01:49 PM

I've been giving my dogs 100mg of NR once a week for the last few months. They both had their blood test recently and the Vet was concerned that there was higher levels of liver enzymes than last blood test. They didn't exactly say what type of enzymes. They said it wasn't alarmingly high but wants to monitor it with a follow up blood test in 6 months as sometimes it can be an early sign of liver cancer. I didn't tell them about the NR and I'm actually not overly concern.

 

I do notice that my dogs seems to much more energetic for a day or 2 after they are given NR.


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#9 Mind

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 05:29 PM

What type of NAD+ boosting supplement do you use?

 

Powdered stuff in caps? Then just mixing it with the pet food.

 

Or a liquid product?

 

I would tend to think that putting it in a liquid mixture and then squirting it in their mouth with a syringe would be one of the more effective ways of making sure they get a standard dose.



#10 hd98

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 12:14 PM

I have it in powdered form in caps. But yes, I empty the cap and mix it in water and given by syringe.



#11 AliceTu

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 03:23 PM

Currently, no NR, glucosamine or chondroitin, rather a tiny amt of UltraCur curcumin (protein attached curcumin) in her food, doesn't seem to bother her and may help with inflammation and general health. Cats are a mystery in so many ways, just like us! Good luck and let us know if you come up with any effective treatments with NMN, NR, or anything else.

 

Since you asked for anything else -- not sure this is off-topic, given how baseline essential methylation is to NAD+ -- I have had excellent results with my cats using b12 as Methylcobalamin (MeCbl) drops on kibble. The changes were noticeable within weeks and continued longer term -- I kept seeing improvements over months, from eating better to attention to mood. My best cat (still alive!) went from being irritable and touchy to being relaxed and affectionate. A second cat whose was chronically ill improved as well, the b12 very much seeming to square the curve of her quality of life before she died.

I wouldn't use one of the artificial b12s, but stay with MeCbl. Note that in liquid form, MeCbl is highly light-sensitive and will degrade quickly into something else if not well light-protected. I find it entirely worth the trouble, though -- I use it myself -- and with cats, it lasts a long time, because they don't need much. (I suppose you could try sublingual tabs, crumbled, but I don't know what the additives would do for the cats, and I'd want to research it first.)

 

For my cats, the results were pretty impressive.

 


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#12 Oakman

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 04:12 PM

Since you asked for anything else -- not sure this is off-topic, given how baseline essential methylation is to NAD+ -- I have had excellent results with my cats using b12 as Methylcobalamin (MeCbl) drops on kibble. The changes were noticeable within weeks and continued longer term -- I kept seeing improvements over months, from eating better to attention to mood. My best cat (still alive!) went from being irritable and touchy to being relaxed and affectionate. A second cat whose was chronically ill improved as well, the b12 very much seeming to square the curve of her quality of life before she died.

I wouldn't use one of the artificial b12s, but stay with MeCbl. Note that in liquid form, MeCbl is highly light-sensitive and will degrade quickly into something else if not well light-protected. I find it entirely worth the trouble, though -- I use it myself -- and with cats, it lasts a long time, because they don't need much. (I suppose you could try sublingual tabs, crumbled, but I don't know what the additives would do for the cats, and I'd want to research it first.)

 

For my cats, the results were pretty impressive.

 

 

That's easy enough to try, and I will! Thanks!  

 

Surprisingly, (or not for a cat), our problem child is doing very well going on three months now on the UltraCur Curcumin in her food, and ear Prednisolone, and hasn't needed a shot! Strange.


Edited by Oakman, 07 June 2018 - 04:13 PM.


#13 Mind

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 06:05 PM

Pablo seems to have done well on a NAD boosting supplement. I just used a commercial blend from a popular supplier. Mixed the powder in with some liquid. I suppose the dose was somewhere around 10 to 30 mg. Hard to control the dosage. All of it did not always "go down".

 

He was to the point where he could not walk due to joint problems. He really perked up and started walking fast again once I started the NAD treatment. Was it the NAD or did he just recuperate on his own? I don't know.

 

We also gave him CBD oil. The base was olive oil, which he seemed to like.

 

I think he would last a lot longer in good health now, except that he has an essentially inoperable tumor in his mouth which is interfering with eating and drinking, so he might not last too much longer.

 

F#*king cancer.



#14 stefan_001

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Posted 21 July 2018 - 07:28 PM

Pablo seems to have done well on a NAD boosting supplement. I just used a commercial blend from a popular supplier. Mixed the powder in with some liquid. I suppose the dose was somewhere around 10 to 30 mg. Hard to control the dosage. All of it did not always "go down".

 

He was to the point where he could not walk due to joint problems. He really perked up and started walking fast again once I started the NAD treatment. Was it the NAD or did he just recuperate on his own? I don't know.

 

We also gave him CBD oil. The base was olive oil, which he seemed to like.

 

I think he would last a lot longer in good health now, except that he has an essentially inoperable tumor in his mouth which is interfering with eating and drinking, so he might not last too much longer.

 

F#*king cancer.

 

Cancer is just the worst :-( :-(

 

Thanks for posting the update. This may be far off but did you consider giving him Honokiol and / or curcumin? Also because it is his mouth perhaps rubbing it on the tumor dissolved in a cream may help. I remember using Honokiol  on skin molds and that did shrink them.
 


Edited by stefan_001, 21 July 2018 - 07:32 PM.


#15 Mind

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Posted 09 April 2019 - 10:31 PM

Update. Pablo seemed to do good on a NAD+ booster, but he was too old to get a lot of benefit, IMO. He died last year at 18 years of age.



#16 joesixpack

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 04:15 AM

Update. Pablo seemed to do good on a NAD+ booster, but he was too old to get a lot of benefit, IMO. He died last year at 18 years of age.

 

18 is nothing to be sneezed at for a dog, even a small dog. Sorry for your loss, good work on taking care of him.



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#17 stefan_001

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 03:29 PM

Update. Pablo seemed to do good on a NAD+ booster, but he was too old to get a lot of benefit, IMO. He died last year at 18 years of age.

 

Sorry to hear Mind, hope you take solace from the fact you managed to give him still some quality life time.
 







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