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Brain fog so bad it's literally killing me

brain fog

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#1 kanekiken

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 09:08 PM


I can't enjoy anything anymore as i'm constantly spaced out and in a daze. My communicative skills are non existent because i'm often too mentally tired to be heard and I struggle with finding words and creating sentences.. I've been struggling for 2 years and I don't know what to do anymore. I'm often suicidal because of this and feel as if there's no way out. What could this be? Where do I go from here? I don't know when this started, frankly right now I feel like i've had this for most of my life just in a milder form but these past two years are when I became completely retarded yet i'm fully aware of it and there's probably just something seriously wrong going on with my body and brain. Any ideas guys?
Tldr : Severe anhedonia, fatigue, anxiety and depression. Don't know what to do. Tried several antidepressants with no effects at all nor withdrawals. Stimulants like ritalin and caffeine help.

#2 pbandy1

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 10:29 PM

Which ADs did you try?

 

I think your best course of action is to see (or continue seeing) a psychiatrist.


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#3 BioInfinite

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 03:50 AM

What does your diet consist of?

 

Try cutting out gluten and avoid high calorie and high fat diets.

 

My dietitian identified that I have a leaky brain - a compromised blood-brain-barrier. Symptoms can include brain fog, chronic fatigue, anxiety/depression, neurodegenerative diseases, and other neurological conditions. Check out this comprehensive guide I found: https://www.selfhack...-brain-barrier/

 

Perhaps ask your doctor to refer you to a dietitian. It is changing my life!

 

Good luck!


Edited by BioInfinite, 10 June 2018 - 03:51 AM.


#4 RYAN474

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Posted 10 June 2018 - 05:26 PM

What is your sleep/wake schedule like? 

 

Waking past 8am promotes depression for many people. 

 

Light therapy can make a profound difference. Especially important is to do it early enough in the morning but not so early that you have to be chronically sleep deprived. For me, this means 6:45-7:30 start time, and for 30 ish minutes. 15 min is not enough. 7:45 am start time too late (still very helpful, but far more helpful when I start at around 7am). There are various books avail 

https://www.amazon.c... light therapy 

 

Further, diet was and is the absolute most powerful intervention to eliminate my brain fog and depression. This is true for a very large and very fast growing segment of people. 

If you haven't already tried a basic paleo type diet, you may want to start there. If you have, you could consider trying the "AIP", autoimmune-paleo protocol. Eileen Laird has a kindle book "The simple guide to the AIP" which is a great start.  http://www.amazon.co...l/dp/1519600283

 

I agree finding and seeing a good psychiatrist is always a good idea. Also finding a good integrative MD, or functional medicine, or naturopathic doctor can be very helpful. Each of those helped me improve along the way. Many are available for phone consultations. 

 

Exercise has been super helpful for me. Adderall is a helpful piece as well, with a formal diagnosis of ADHD. Wellbutrin previously helped me until I reduced the inflammation at the root of my depression and brain fog. Then I didn't need it any longer. I could list a few dozen other things that are crucial to me maintaining good mood, energy, and reducing brain fog, but I'll leave it there.

 

Happy to help if you have any questions! 

Best, 

 

 

 

 


Edited by ryan474, 10 June 2018 - 05:28 PM.

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#5 kanekiken

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 11:41 AM

Which ADs did you try?

 

I think your best course of action is to see (or continue seeing) a psychiatrist.

What's the point though ? I've tried 6 different medications [Wellbutrin, Venlafaxin, zoloft etc..] and never had even the slightest effect from any of them. I truly think there's something 'physical' going on but I don't know where to start

 

What does your diet consist of?

 

Try cutting out gluten and avoid high calorie and high fat diets.

 

My dietitian identified that I have a leaky brain - a compromised blood-brain-barrier. Symptoms can include brain fog, chronic fatigue, anxiety/depression, neurodegenerative diseases, and other neurological conditions. Check out this comprehensive guide I found: https://www.selfhack...-brain-barrier/

 

Perhaps ask your doctor to refer you to a dietitian. It is changing my life!

 

Good luck!

I've tried going keto for a month which kinda gave me more fatigue and worsened really worsened my anhedonia which was horrible. Tried to stick with it but didn't see any benefits. Honestly leaky BBB sounds like bro science but i'll check it out thanks.



#6 Major Legend

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 07:45 AM

Hey I know where you are coming from, not sure if my fatigue was ever as bad as yours but I used to have pretty bad brain fog and fatigue before biohacking myself.

I use Extramel and Astaxanthin 12mg. Not sure if these will help, but nobody seems to know about Extramel, here is some research about it, feel free to add:

 

http://stardust.bio/...igue-and-stress

 

The controversial stuff:

 

Fatigue can be countered immediately by boosting hormone levels using DHEA 200mg, and Rhodiola 500mg X 2 . There is loads of evidence that Rhodiola is anti-fatigue.

 

Warning about Rhodiola, tolerance can build to it, so I only use the above when I am having a fatigue attack.


Edited by Major Legend, 13 June 2018 - 07:50 AM.


#7 John250

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 03:55 PM

Hey I know where you are coming from, not sure if my fatigue was ever as bad as yours but I used to have pretty bad brain fog and fatigue before biohacking myself.

I use Extramel and Astaxanthin 12mg. Not sure if these will help, but nobody seems to know about Extramel, here is some research about it, feel free to add:

http://stardust.bio/...igue-and-stress

The controversial stuff:

Fatigue can be countered immediately by boosting hormone levels using DHEA 200mg, and Rhodiola 500mg X 2 . There is loads of evidence that Rhodiola is anti-fatigue.

Warning about Rhodiola, tolerance can build to it, so I only use the above when I am having a fatigue attack.

I’ve noticed with Rhodiola at lower doses(50-100mg) I’ll get mild energy but higher doses cause more relaxation.

200mg DHEA is a pretty big dose. A lot of that will convert to estrogen but then again oral absorption isn’t the greatest. At 100mg/day oral my dhea levels barely changed. At 100mg sublingual they only increased around 5%. At only 30mg transdermal(applied to inner thighs) they increased about 15%

Edited by John250, 13 June 2018 - 03:57 PM.

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#8 poonja

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 04:50 PM

When I suffered from  brain fog etc on two occasions, I discovered that I suffered from unstable blood sugar and later from low testosterone.  You should check both our as well as checking your thyroid.


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#9 Major Legend

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 04:07 AM

I’ve noticed with Rhodiola at lower doses(50-100mg) I’ll get mild energy but higher doses cause more relaxation.

200mg DHEA is a pretty big dose. A lot of that will convert to estrogen but then again oral absorption isn’t the greatest. At 100mg/day oral my dhea levels barely changed. At 100mg sublingual they only increased around 5%. At only 30mg transdermal(applied to inner thighs) they increased about 15%

 

It seems to work well enough, if conversion ratio is a problem, I have DIM on hand and I do take that quite regularly.



#10 Gallus

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 10:31 AM

I was suffering from severe brain fog for some years, mood disturbances and extreme fatigue 'attacks' (not sleepy, just feeling fried and out-of-it) ..  I was in good health, have always eaten very well, and good physical shape..

 

Saw the doctor to try find a cause, was tested for liver function, T levels etc etc but all showed normal..    eventually I requested a Vitamin D check from my Doctor (this was in 2016)...    when the results came back my level was critical at 25nmol, with the acceptable range being  75-200 nmol.

 

I told my doctor that I was going on holiday the following week so that should be problem solved .... she said in reality it will likely take months to correct with supplementation/sun exposure.

 

After that I have spent as much time in the sun as possible, and my brain fog & fatigue got steadily better...  I have not had a single fatigue episode in over a year now, and my overall wellbeing has improved massively.

 

I know this may not be the same for you, but in my case this seems to have been the issue - might be worth getting your Vit D level tested?



#11 ChooseAName

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 10:29 PM

I used to have serious brain fog, but after making some changes like those in the posts above, I rarely have issues these days.  One thing I don't see mentioned above that has helped me a lot is forcing myself to snack between meals.  I eat breakfast at around 6:30, and lunch at around 11:45.  Forcing myself to eat a snack at 10:00 greatly reduces my fatigue later in the day.



#12 gamesguru

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 10:45 PM

eat this, take that, try this.  everyone has advice, but the real cause could be any little easily overlooked thing.  one says to snack between meals, fasting isn't good, but your problem is too much glutamate so eating more (protein) doesn't help.  another says vitamin d, one says medicines.

 

you start hanging a question mark on so many things, last but not least your attitude, but no, no this is surely a very scientific thing.  but it isn't all: your mood, your morale at work, your sense (or lack of) belonging or love, the general outlook you have toward things when your feet hit the floor.  if you're looking to turn this around all with a pill you'll be disappointed

 

i would look at getting dopamine, glutamate and acetylcholine under control.  you might have too much of all three, glutamate/dopamine maybe too little hard saying.  you'll want to try some things, not all at the same time, but don't expect instant results either.  just try stuff til you find what works.

  • turmeric (glutamate), magnesium (dopamine), ginger (dopamine)
  • lower protein diet as eggs will tip the acetylcholine scale, and meats will tip glutamate
  • exercise (medium intensity, jogging only a bit of lifting, 4-6 days/week)


#13 Astroid

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Posted 20 August 2018 - 01:48 AM

In 2010 I was in a bad fog mentally... I thought I was getting Alzheimer's... but all of a sudden?  I doubted that.

My MD was worthless at figuring it out.. He said my Thyroid Rx was too high.. which I thought was insane... 

 

Finally I came across a retired Architecture that said ... "You sound like me when I had lead poison. You should see my MD."

 

As soon as I described my problems to the MD, she said... "You have lead poison."

I did not think so, but the test proved I had a low level of it.

Plus I was at the bottom of the charts for B-12 & D3. 

After treatment with EDTA Chelation via IV.. I was still in a fog.  

Great.. Now what?

 

Then in 2011, a smart friend wrote and said, "People with Alzheimer's are deficient in CHOLINE."

 

One needs 750 mg of Choline 7-14 days to see results.. Order in bulk.. as it is cheap.

So I took 750 mg twice a day.. in a shot of water.. 

Then on day 5,  I woke up.

 

I take it every 2-3 days now.. or I get tired mentally.. 

 

I recommend Choline and all vitamins that impact the brain.. like B12, Magnesium, etc.. 

 

 

 

 



#14 Hip

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Posted 21 August 2018 - 02:23 AM

Severe anhedonia, fatigue, anxiety and depression. Don't know what to do. Tried several antidepressants with no effects at all nor withdrawals. Stimulants like ritalin and caffeine help.


Have you considered a myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome diagnosis? This would explain your fatigue and brain fog, and your difficulty finding words; word retrieval issues are part of the brain fog symptoms of ME/CFS.

Anxiety and depression are also common comorbid symptoms in ME/CFS.

ME/CFS is usually triggered by a viral infection. Antivirals sometimes prove effective in treatment.
 
 
For more info on ME/CFS, see this roadmap of chronic fatigue syndrome treatment.


Edited by Hip, 21 August 2018 - 02:24 AM.


#15 Breakthrough

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Posted 10 December 2018 - 10:55 PM

@kanekiken You sound very similar to my and my condition. I hope you have made progress. I have bouts where I feel normal and I attribute it to something I’m experimenting at the time but I haven’t been able to nail any treatment down. Do you ever have periods where you feels normal/smart?

#16 ceridwen

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 04:45 AM

I just learned that spending more than 2 hours a day on one's mobile thins the cortex. This decreases IQ, memory and cognition. Perhaps rationing time on line might help
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#17 John250

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Posted 11 December 2018 - 07:23 PM

I just learned that spending more than 2 hours a day on one's mobile thins the cortex. This decreases IQ, memory and cognition. Perhaps rationing time on line might help


Is this due to blue light? I always set my color to night mode(warmer contrast).

#18 prunk

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 02:20 PM

Is this due to blue light? I always set my color to night mode(warmer contrast).

I think it just wrecks your attention.

#19 YimYam

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Posted 21 December 2018 - 07:20 PM

Have you considered a myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome diagnosis? This would explain your fatigue and brain fog, and your difficulty finding words; word retrieval issues are part of the brain fog symptoms of ME/CFS.

Anxiety and depression are also common comorbid symptoms in ME/CFS.

ME/CFS is usually triggered by a viral infection. Antivirals sometimes prove effective in treatment.
 
 
For more info on ME/CFS, see this roadmap of chronic fatigue syndrome treatment.

 

 

Do you think its possible to have all those cognitive symptoms without chronic fatigue and it still be labelled as ME?



#20 jjnz

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 11:52 AM

can I suggest that you have some form of Brain inflammation ?

I have similar symptoms to you but mine are variable, some weeks I'm fine , other weeks I'm not.

I also have an inflammatory disorder called Lupus which is known for its ability to come and go.

it correlates perfectly with my brainfog.

 

If I take 30mg of prednisone for 2 days ALL of my brain fog goes, I think sharper, I am a dictionary and a thesaurus on steroids, literally. I am about 10x more competent all around.

The bad news is you can't keep taking prednisone but it will certainly tell you if the cause of the brainfog is inflammation or not. Then you might be able to develop an anti inflammatory strategy

 

Takes 2-3 days to find out. 

 



#21 DrewMichael21

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 08:59 PM

 Can you be more specific on what you mean by Brain fog. That's a very generic word. Frankly, I've typically have these fogs when I eat really really badly. You need to figure out what is causing this suppression of your PFC first. Drugs, should be your last resort and not your first resort. Have you been through any traumatic experiences, do you chronically masterbate, Are you battling addictions? Do you smoke or drink? Do you take heroine? Do play chronic videogames all day? Do you hear voices in your head. You need to be more specific. At the very least, I reccomend fasting for a couple of days and drink calories via juices and then see how you feel. I noticed off my concerta medication my cognitive IQ and socializing skills increase by about 5 points give or take.  So this, is a possibility. Finally, their are literally so many pollutants and factors that it's hard to ascertain without more background information. The minimum, is fasting, light cardio, and FIX YOUR SLEEP schedule. Sleep is very important and don't neglect it just because your young. I would say sleep is number but I need more information.



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#22 Hip

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 06:45 AM

Do you think its possible to have all those cognitive symptoms without chronic fatigue and it still be labelled as ME?

 
Officially no, because all the standard criteria for myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome require that fatigue is present. See  the CDC Fukuda criteria for ME/CFS, or the more precise Canadian consensus criteria (see the 7 boxed criteria on page 2), or the nice and simple IOM criteria.

 

However, sometimes the fatigue can be quite mild in ME/CFS, so it may not be the most prominent symptom.







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