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Vitamin D - necessary or unnecessary

vitamins d verdict

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#1 Heyguy

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 12:50 PM


Hello,
I just started taking vitamin d but I read an article that vitamin d is unnecessary to take, since its benefits are rather a cause of an already healthy lifestyle and taking it is unnecessary

https://gettingstron...-d-supplements/

#2 experimenting

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 02:13 PM

Get your levels checked, but it was a hugely impact up supplement for me. It's more of a hormone than a vitamin- if you are severely deficient, supplementation can be life changing. Be careful with your doses, start at 1-2k iu and work up if you need. If you go up to 5k iu a day you probably need to supplement at least a K complex alongside.

The thing with mainstream studies is they test for just one variable (does D prevent fractures?) for instance. D is a very complex compound with lots of far reaching effects. Many are deficient.
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#3 pamojja

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 04:21 PM

Many are deficient.

 

to be precise, from dietary intake:

 

 

How Much is Too Much? : Appendix B: Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies in the U.S.

Nutrient from food alone, ranked by the occurrence of dietary inadequacy among adults | Percentage of dietary intakes below the estimated average requirement for a specific population* | Naturally occurring sources of nutrient**

2-to-8-year-old children | 14-to-18-year-old girls | Adults 19 and older

Vitamin D | 81% | 98% | 95% | Fatty fish, mushrooms [vitamin D is naturally formed in the body when skin is exposed to sunlight; vitamin D is added to fortified milk]

Vitamin E | 65% | 99% | 94% | Nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, green leafy vegetables

Magnesium | 2% | 90% | 61% | Whole grains, wheat bran and wheat germ, green leafy vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds

Vitamin A | 6% | 57% | 51% | Preformed vitamin A: liver, fatty fish, milk, eggs; provitamin A carotenoids: carrots, pumpkins, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables

Calcium | 23% | 81% | 49% | Milk, yogurt, cheese, kale, broccoli

Vitamin C | 2% | 45% | 43% | All fruits and vegetables, particularly citrus fruits and tomatoes

Vitamin B6 | 0.1% | 18% | 15% | Many foods; highest levels in fish, beef, poultry, potatoes and other starchy vegetables, and fruit other than citrus

Folate | 0.2% | 19% | 13% | Many foods; highest levels in spinach, liver, asparagus, Brussels sprouts [mandatory, standardized addition to enriched flour and flour products]

Zinc | 0.2% | 24% | 12% | Red meat, poultry, beans, nuts, some seafood, whole grains

Iron | 0.7% | 12% | 8% | Highest amounts in meat and seafood; lower levels in nuts and beans [mandatory, standardized addition to enriched flour and flour products]

Thiamin | 0.1% | 10% | 7% | Whole grain products [mandatory, standardized addition to enriched flour and flour products]

Copper | 0% | 16% | 5% | Shellfish, whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, organ meats (kidneys, liver)

Vitamin B12 | 0% | 7% | 4% | Animal products: fish, meat, poultry, eggs, milk

Riboflavin | 0% | 5% | 2% | Milk and dairy products, eggs, meat, green leafy vegetables, legumes [mandatory, standardized addition to enriched flour and flour products]

Niacin | 0.1% | 4% | 2% | Meat, fish, seeds and nuts, whole grains [mandatory, standardized addition to enriched flour and flour products]

Selenium | 0% | 2% | 1% | Found in different plant and animal foods; highest levels in seafood and organ meats (kidneys, liver)



#4 experimenting

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 04:24 PM

Bit of a topic hijack but how does one supplement Vit E? Controversy about this. Also seen that iron deficiency prevalence is much higher, no?

#5 Heyguy

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 09:44 AM

Did anyone read the actual article?

#6 pamojja

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:46 AM

Did anyone read the actual article?

 

I only skipped it over, and found nothing convincing not already read many times. On the contrary, have you read the comment section there with pro and cons too, before asking about here?

 

However, since 10 years I regularly and very attentively read my 25(OH)D serum levels, additional to almost 300 blood, urine, hair and other parameters, in which time-period I also implemented comprehensive supplementation.

 

That means I also got sufficient of all the co-factors (Mg, Vitamin A+Ks, boron...) needed for vitamin D to work properly. Which although is widely known, has till now almost never been studied in combination at all. Just vitamin D alone, as the pharmacological model dictates. And not as in real life situations, where one is able to adjust all those co-factors, including diet and sun, to their sweet spot too.

 

I always start with lowest possible doses of any supplement and increase gradually over weeks, months and years, while monitoring all effects. Thereby I found recently, for example, when I reached above 20.000 IU/d of preformed vitamin A, that my infrequent psoriasis outbreaks (for 20 years) completely ceased. But moreover for the first time all these years full-body sun-exposure for the first time all these years substantially contributed to 25(OH)D levels, so that I could now half my daily vitamin D dose.

 

Not only have most lab-marker been improved, I had even a 60% walking-disability revoked from a PAD 2, a newly diagnosed COPD 1, became asymptomatic and also in labs has further improved. And reversed a T2D. That all without neglecting all Antioxidants taken at high doses. But still some room to improve some oxidation markers further..

 

Now by the repeated personal experience of the unexcelled power for remissions of conventionally considered mercilessly progressing chronic diseases (PAD, COPD, T2D) by a very healthy diet and targeted comprehensive supplementation, I'm convinced such could have been easily prevented with less drastic measures (ie. mega-doses), but before I was ignorant enough in believing there would be no need for supplementation too. And I paid a high prize for my ignorance.

 

 

Here is the takeaway from this vitamin D story, together with my earlier post about antioxidants: Inflammatory conditions, such as heart disease, infection or autoimmune disease are often associated with reduced levels of certain biomarkers in the blood,  such as antioxidant vitamins or hormones.  Our natural instinct is to conclude that these are “deficiencies” that need to be corrected.   While that may sometimes be the case, particularly in extreme cases, you should keep in mind the direct supplementation with additional vitamin or hormone may actually be counterproductive–by shutting down or impairing your body’s own ability to mount it’s own defense against oxidative stress and inflammation.

 

That approach worked perfectly fine for me. Healed for example form tuberculosis, spinal-cord infection and 7 malaria attacks at young age. Until exactly at age 41 my own defense crumbled - by never having giving a though to having it better fed.


Edited by pamojja, 09 October 2018 - 10:59 AM.


#7 dosquito

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 07:33 PM

I only skipped it over, and found nothing convincing not already read many times. On the contrary, have you read the comment section there with pro and cons too, before asking about here?

 

However, since 10 years I regularly and very attentively read my 25(OH)D serum levels, additional to almost 300 blood, urine, hair and other parameters, in which time-period I also implemented comprehensive supplementation.

 

That means I also got sufficient of all the co-factors (Mg, Vitamin A+Ks, boron...) needed for vitamin D to work properly. Which although is widely known, has till now almost never been studied in combination at all. Just vitamin D alone, as the pharmacological model dictates. And not as in real life situations, where one is able to adjust all those co-factors, including diet and sun, to their sweet spot too.

 

I always start with lowest possible doses of any supplement and increase gradually over weeks, months and years, while monitoring all effects. Thereby I found recently, for example, when I reached above 20.000 IU/d of preformed vitamin A, that my infrequent psoriasis outbreaks (for 20 years) completely ceased. But moreover for the first time all these years full-body sun-exposure for the first time all these years substantially contributed to 25(OH)D levels, so that I could now half my daily vitamin D dose.

 

Not only have most lab-marker been improved, I had even a 60% walking-disability revoked from a PAD 2, a newly diagnosed COPD 1, became asymptomatic and also in labs has further improved. And reversed a T2D. That all without neglecting all Antioxidants taken at high doses. But still some room to improve some oxidation markers further..

 

Now by the repeated personal experience of the unexcelled power for remissions of conventionally considered mercilessly progressing chronic diseases (PAD, COPD, T2D) by a very healthy diet and targeted comprehensive supplementation, I'm convinced such could have been easily prevented with less drastic measures (ie. mega-doses), but before I was ignorant enough in believing there would be no need for supplementation too. And I paid a high prize for my ignorance.

 

 

That approach worked perfectly fine for me. Healed for example form tuberculosis, spinal-cord infection and 7 malaria attacks at young age. Until exactly at age 41 my own defense crumbled - by never having giving a though to having it better fed.

Could you explain more about your health journey?

 

And where do you get these tests?

 

My doctor always makes it seem like such apain if I even ask for ferritin



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#8 pamojja

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 08:27 PM

Could you explain more about your health journey?

 

And where do you get these tests?

 

My doctor always makes it seem like such apain if I even ask for ferritin

 

In detail in the Regimens section.

 

It helps to have an Alphabet soup of diagnosis, to have most rudimentary lab-tests re-checked regularly. COPD helped with regular blood gases and lung-function tests. A Testosterone deficiency for hormones thoroughly and regularly tested. An anaphylactic shock for allergy testing. However, it also took me years and lots of bargaining to get my GP order more unusual tests. In the beginning for example also paid even my 25(OH)Ds out of my pocket. And still do pay many out of my pocket, like yearly HTMAs, or usually not at all tested labs, like oxLDL, retinol, RBP, CoQ10, SOD, GSH-Px, certain Minerals in whole blood, etc., but only once every 2-3 years (where I did pick those tests relatively cheaply prized in a local lab).
 


Edited by pamojja, 09 October 2018 - 08:28 PM.






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