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Iron chelators Non Heme or Heme iron?

iron

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#1 John250

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 06:41 PM


My ferritin is on the lower end from too many phlebotomies. I eat plenty of protein and sometimes Supplement with iron to get my levels up but many of my health supplements are supposed iron chelaors. I use quite a few polyphenols and UltraCur Curcumin. Do these only effect non heme iron or heme iron as well. The health benefits from the Curcumin and Polyphenols are too good to pass up but then again low ferritin is detrimental. So it’s a double edged sword. I’ve read conflicting studies on Curcumin really being a chelaor but how big of an impact can these supplements have on lowering ferritin? Thanks

#2 Dorian Grey

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 02:58 AM

To the best of my knowledge, the chelators (Curcumin, Quercetin & phytic acid / IP6) only chelate free/labile iron and do not affect protein bound iron or hemoglobin.  They may absorb dietary iron in the gut if taken with meals though (particularly phytic acid), and polyphenols in tea & coffee are known to block absorption of dietary non-heme iron.    

 

I've read a very small amount of Vitamin-C (perhaps even a squeeze of lemon in ice tea) will counter the iron absorption blocking properties of polyphenols.  Something you might be interested in looking into.  



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#3 John250

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 04:24 AM

To the best of my knowledge, the chelators (Curcumin, Quercetin & phytic acid / IP6) only chelate free/labile iron and do not affect protein bound iron or hemoglobin. They may absorb dietary iron in the gut if taken with meals though (particularly phytic acid), and polyphenols in tea & coffee are known to block absorption of dietary non-heme iron.

I've read a very small amount of Vitamin-C (perhaps even a squeeze of lemon in ice tea) will counter the iron absorption blocking properties of polyphenols. Something you might be interested in looking into.


Great thanks. I’ll time them accordingly.

#4 Phoebus

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 05:50 AM

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/15743017

 

I would eat a meal in foods high in iron, and take Vit C with that meal. 

 

then take your polyphenols at a different time of the day

 

Quercetin is the most powerful iron chelating polyphenol  


Edited by Phoebus, 09 October 2018 - 05:52 AM.


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#5 John250

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 03:29 PM

https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/15743017

I would eat a meal in foods high in iron, and take Vit C with that meal.

then take your polyphenols at a different time of the day

Quercetin is the most powerful iron chelating polyphenol


Thanks too bad ip6 is such a chealtor





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