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High-flavonol cocoa powders

navitas chococru acticoa

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#1 GaloisField

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 05:05 PM


An exchange with Navitas :

 

Hello,

Thank you for contacting us and for your interest in our Cacao Powder.

Our old packaging did only specify 17 mg/serving of flavanols. This was based on some very specific, restrictive testing. We have broadened the scope of our flavanol/flavanoid testing and our packaging now states that our product contains 700 mg/serving of flavanols. Our testing is all conducted by independent, third-party labs, and we are confident in this number.

Unfortunately, we do not share our COA documents as we consider them proprietary information.

I hope this information is helpful. Please feel free to reach out with any further questions.

Sincerely,
Product Specialist

-----Original Message-----
Sent: 11/7/2018
Subject: COA Cocoa / Flavonoid Content

Hey, do you guys have a COA with the flavonoid content of your cocoa powder? On iHerb it says 17mg / serving but that seems like it would be rather low.

 

A serving is about 15g so this would imply a flavonol content of about 4.6%. Is this credible? I've been looking for a reasonably-priced cocoa powder that sports a high flavonol content. Been using Chococru (8% flavonols) for a while but it's rather expensive. Acticoa (from Callebaut) only comes in pearls, not in the form of powder. There's one other powder on Amazon but it has a 1% flavonol content which is fairly little. Any others?



#2 AceNZ

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 10:38 AM

Acticoa is available as Lavlé chocolate now.

 

Did you have any luck with Navitas Cocoa powder?

 

I'm thinking of trying it, since it's insanely expensive to have Lavlé shipped from Belgium to New Zealand....

 



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#3 GaloisField

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 11:18 AM

I use Chococru if they're in stock. Hadn't heard of Lavlé but it has less than 25% of Chococru's flavonol content. As per usual they sell these chocolates at 200mg per serving which renders it much more expensive (about twice as expensive as Chococru, and I live in Belgium so it's not the shipping).

Navitas is said to be high in heavy metals, unfortunately.

 

Callebaut never responds to my messages about buying their Acticoa powder, they only sell it in bulk. Good for a group buy maybe.



#4 AceNZ

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 07:45 PM

That's unfortunate about Navitas. Would have been a good choice for me otherwise, since it's readily available on iherb.

 

I can't find Chococru available in-stock anywhere. Supposedly available again on 14 Feb. Shipping is going to be a pain.

 

I'm trying to get pricing on Acticoa. I'll post here if I have any luck.

 


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#5 brosci

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 09:06 PM

I've been on the lookout for Acticoa powder, but haven't seen it anywhere.

 

While looking for a good cocoa powder, I came across FlavaNaturals with 900mg flavanols per serving, although it's a little carb-heavy for a low-carb diet @ 8g/serving, and a serving is a fat scoop of powder. Any idea how this compares in heavy metal content or overall quality vs Cocoavia or Chococru?


Edited by brosci, 10 March 2019 - 09:06 PM.

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#6 GaloisField

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 09:33 PM

The price is okay. Too bad they don't ship internationally. I asked Callebaut again, they referred me to some local seller who apparently can sell the powder but after 2 exchanges they stopped responding (I asked whether or not they could notify me when they'd be back in stock, and what the cost per kilo would be). Chococru claimed they'd be back in stock in mid-February, that didn't happen, I asked about it, they said it'd be back in March and said they'd specify a date but there is still no date. Those flavonols don't want to be eaten :(.

 

FlavaNaturals and Callebaut seem to work together ;

https://www.comunica...anol-chocolate/

so the heavy metal content is unlikely to be high, though I don't know the numbers for Acticoa either.

 

Chococru is supposed to be rather low in heavy metals, or so they claim.

 

"Answer from CHOCOCRU- An important question, thank you. All our cocoa products receive a Certificate of Conformity which confirms that our cocoa conforms to current legislation as well as all the new stricter legislation to be implemented in 2019, regarding heavy metals. Cadmium is found naturally in the soil and can be particularly high in volcanic regions. Cocoa beans from Indonesia and South America for instance tend to have higher levels of cadmium. Cadmium levels in CHOCOCRU are well below the legislation requirement. This is partly due to the region in which our beans are grown, as well as the methods used in processing the beans. Our cocoa is unusual in that it contains 9-11%% fat (cocoa butter) whereas most cocoas contain 22-24% fat. Our natural cold pressed, fat reduction method also helps remove cadmium residue. This further reduces the cadmium levels well below the average threshold. Should you require further detailed information, please contact Maria at CHOCOCRU. we will be happy to assist you further." https://www.apoe4.in...opic.php?t=2345 

Edited by GaloisField, 10 March 2019 - 09:44 PM.


#7 AceNZ

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 10:11 PM

I heard back from my local distributor for Callebaut. They quoted a price of NZ$47.67 per kg (appx US$33.37), plus air freight to New Zealand, with a minimum order of one 25 kg bag.

 

Too much for me, so I'm still looking for alternatives....

 



#8 GaloisField

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 10:16 PM

Ah, nice to know the price per kilo. That's quite reasonable, it's more than 4 times cheaper than Chococru. Too bad about the 'minimum order' part. I have a COA somewhere in my mails of their 'dark chocolate callets', something like 35% sugar. The sugar seems like a negative when it comes to the effectiveness of the flavonols.



#9 AceNZ

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 11:39 PM

I ran into an interesting-sounding report about flavanol levels in commercial cocoa powder and chocolates, but the fee for it is much more than I'm willing to spend. Others might be interested, though:

 

https://www.consumer...ocoa-flavanols/

 


Edited by AceNZ, 10 March 2019 - 11:43 PM.


#10 brosci

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 02:32 AM

I ran into an interesting-sounding report about flavanol levels in commercial cocoa powder and chocolates, but the fee for it is much more than I'm willing to spend. Others might be interested, though:

 

https://www.consumer...ocoa-flavanols/

 

I read that report back when I had a membership to consumerlab.  The gist was to eat Baker's unsweeted chocolate, which optimized for polyphenols : price x heavy metals.  Wildly Organic also has cacao powder with heavy metal analysis at a moderate 0.783 ppm level, which conforms to the 0.8 EU standards (followed by the likes of Chococru.)

 

Still, I'd love to find one that hit all the marks.... something that tastes like rich chocolate (the unfermented ones tend to taste pretty bland... as do the non-alkali processed ones to some extent), and something that avoids fillers like maltodextrin... something without extra carbohydrates... and tests very low for metals and mycotoxins while high in flavonols. Surprisingly, this barely exists on the market. I wouldn't mind a mix of something like Coffee Fruit Extract for Mocha chocolate benefits.


Edited by brosci, 11 March 2019 - 02:35 AM.

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#11 AceNZ

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 05:01 AM

I read that report back when I had a membership to consumerlab.  The gist was to eat Baker's unsweeted chocolate, which optimized for polyphenols : price x heavy metals.  Wildly Organic also has cacao powder with heavy metal analysis at a moderate 0.783 ppm level, which conforms to the 0.8 EU standards (followed by the likes of Chococru.)

 

I'm thinking about making my own chocolate, so I'm looking for a cocoa powder that would be suitable: high flavanol, good taste, low cadmium and other heavy metals.

 

Suggestions welcome.



#12 GaloisField

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 09:05 PM

Wouldn't you be heating it then? Eating fresh beans would be an other option (assuming heavy metal content isn't too high), but it's way higher in calories. Not even sure if the whole thing is worth it, given the price and low availability (aside from the fact that relatively few studies have been done).



#13 AceNZ

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 09:51 PM

Wouldn't you be heating it then? Eating fresh beans would be an other option (assuming heavy metal content isn't too high), but it's way higher in calories. Not even sure if the whole thing is worth it, given the price and low availability (aside from the fact that relatively few studies have been done).

 

Yes, the recipe I have in mind does require briefly heating the cocoa powder on low heat. I'm not too worried about the heat destroying the flavanols, although I suppose a post-preparation test for flavanol levels would be warranted, to know for sure -- which means now I need to find a lab that can do such a thing.

 

I recall reading that one of the advantages of Acticoa is that it's also high in EGCG. That would be an interesting aspect to track, as well.


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#14 Heisok

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 09:52 PM

Fresh might be better if you can get them.

 

The melting point of chocolate as in Bakers unsweetened is low at under 100 degrees Fahrenheit. I work with a double boiler keeping the water temperature as low as possible. Due to making mine with an Erythritol/Monk Fruit blend, I dissolve the sweetener in a little water, and then add the chocolate to melt. I also use Cacao butter, so would prefer a cacao powder which is as pure as possible, instead of the Bakers.  Once the chocolate is melted, I take the top container off, and keep stirring as the mixture cools. I do not have a specific recipe as I make it adjusting ingredients as I go depending how the mixture looks. I also use a full fat dried colostrum powder as the mixture cools.

 

I would not use the microwave method like the box indicates is the quick way to melt.


Edited by Heisok, 11 March 2019 - 09:54 PM.

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#15 TempBannedNotComingBack

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 07:26 AM

https://www.eurekale...c-nsr100808.php

 

Over the past ten years, dark chocolate and cocoa have become recognized through numerous studies for flavanol antioxidant benefits. In a study published this month in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists from The Hershey Company and Brunswick Laboratories of Norton, MA report on the levels of antioxidants in selected cocoa powders and the effect of processing on the antioxidant levels. The study, which analyzed Hershey's Natural Cocoa Powder and nineteen other cocoa powders, reported that natural cocoa powders have the highest levels of antioxidants. Natural cocoa powders contained an average of 34.6 mg of flavanols per gram of cocoa powder, or about 3.5% of total flavanols by weight. This places cocoa powder among the foods highest in these types of antioxidants.

The study went on to look at a variety of Dutched (alkaline processed) cocoa powders, which are commonly used by the food industry. New findings showed that the Dutched cocoa powders, especially the light- and medium-Dutched cocoa powders, retained significant amounts of cocoa flavanol antioxidants. In fact, despite the losses created by light to medium Dutch processing, these cocoa powders still were in the top 10% of flavanol-containing foods when results were compared to foods listed in the USDA Procyanidin Database.

"This is an important finding for people who like all things chocolate." said Ken Miller, the lead author of the paper. "Because cocoa powder is one of the richest sources of flavanol antioxidants to start with, even lightly- or medium-Dutched processed cocoa powders still retain significant levels of the beneficial antioxidants."

Dutching, or alkali treatment, of cocoa is a 180-year-old process used to lower the bitterness and darken the color of cocoa powder. Dutched cocoas are commonly used in beverages such as chocolate milk and hot cocoa mixes, in cakes and cookies, and in a limited number of confections. In the United States, the presence of Dutched cocoa or Dutched chocolate is indicated by looking for the terms "dutched" or "processed with alkali" on the ingredients label.
 

In this study, the degree of cocoa alkalization caused a progressive, but not complete loss, of flavanol antioxidants, with about 40% retained in lightly dutched cocoas, 25% retained in medium dutched cocoas, and 10% retained in heavily dutched cocoas.

 

 


Edited by manny, 14 March 2019 - 07:27 AM.


#16 GaloisField

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 02:32 PM

https://www.consumer...s-special-dark/

 

Testing by ConsumerLab.com suggests that Hershey's Special Dark products are actually lower in beneficial cocoa flavanols than many other dark chocolates and cocoa powders. The likely reason for this is that Hershey's Special Extra Dark chocolate and cocoa powder are "processed with alkali." This process, also known as "dutching," makes cocoa and dark chocolate less bitter and a bit darker, but also significantly reduces the flavanol content. 

ConsumerLab.com found that Hershey's Special Dark chocolate bar actually had the lowest concentration of cocoa flavanols among 16 popular dark chocolates it tested. Flavanol levels among the bars ranged from a low of just 3.4 mg per gram in Hershey's Special Dark to a high of 14.8 mg per gram, with most bars providing between 4.5 to 9 mg of flavanols per gram. At a standard serving size of 40 grams, many bars can easily provide at least 200 mg of flavanols — an amount associated with improved blood flow, but Hershey's Special Dark does not. 

Although ConsumerLab.com did not test Hershey's Special Dark cocoa powder, it did test Hershey's "100% cacao, natural unsweetened" cocoa powder -- which is not treated with alkali. This powder contained one of the highest concentrations of flavanols among the cocoa powders tested, providing about 24 mg of flavanols per gram, while most powders provided between and 12 mg and 26 mg per gram. However, Hershey's natural cocoa powder was found to be contaminated with cadmium -- which is a kidney toxin, although it was not alone in this respect: Every cocoa powder tested was found to be contaminated with cadmium and/or lead, another toxic heavy metal. 

The amount of cadmium found in a 1 tablespoon serving of Hershey's natural cocoa powder was just over the daily limit for chronic (long-term) cadmium exposure as established in Canada (the U.S. has not established a limit). It would seem best to use such products in moderation. Relatively high amounts of cadmium were also found by ConsumerLab in some of the dark chocolates; in fact, two had several timesthe Canadian limit, although cadmium was not an issue in Hershey's Special Dark chocolate. 

 

 

Hershey's study is here : https://pubs.acs.org....1021/jf801670p


Edited by GaloisField, 15 March 2019 - 02:34 PM.


#17 GaloisField

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 11:48 AM

Normally Chococru will be back in stock this wednesday ...






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