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Any benefits to taking Resveratrol if currently taking 750mg NMN?

resveratrol nmn

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#1 RichardAlan

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 05:29 PM


I realize Dr. Sinclair said he was still taking Resveratrol but I'm wondering if that's more because of what he's been saying about it over the years and because of that he can't really say he's just given up on it.   I'm starting to take NMN and at this time wondering what (if any) benefits there would be to also taking Resveratrol? 



#2 Oakman

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 11:36 PM

As I recollect in one of the recently linked videos on the forum, he was asked why he took resveratrol, and he said something to the effect (and this is not an exact quote), "I'm familiar with resveratrol because of my work, and I have tubs of it in the basement, so why not?"  I thought that sounded a bit flippant (again that's an approximation of what I remember), but it stuck in my mind andI thought to myself at the time, "Say WHAT!?"


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#3 ceridwen

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 11:47 PM

I hope NR doesn't go the way of Resveratrol. The latest findings make me doubt anything Sinclair says.
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#4 Oakman

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 11:52 PM

That being said, if it's any help to you, I still take his advice as somewhat gospel, and so part of my daily regime is currently 1g (in two doses) 100% trans-resveratrol, 250mg NR, and 'some' NMN, depending on how much exercising I'm doing that day.  That means beyond the non-exercise daily 125 mg sublingual NMN, on cycling days I add 450-600 mgs NMN (in both powdered and sublingual), 400-800 mgs oral PeakATP, and a sublingual B12. The combo makes me a bit nervous feeling until I get going, but once in my workout it really seems to amp up the power and endurance I experience. Of course, that very subjective, but I do have data showing great improvement over time doing this.


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#5 RichardAlan

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 03:23 AM

I hope NR doesn't go the way of Resveratrol. The latest findings make me doubt anything Sinclair says.

 

What are those latest findings that you refer to?  I'm also a little bit confused and concerned with Sinclair.  The things he says seem to leave people with more questions than answers sometimes. 


That being said, if it's any help to you, I still take his advice as somewhat gospel, and so part of my daily regime is currently 1g (in two doses) 100% trans-resveratrol, 250mg NR, and 'some' NMN, depending on how much exercising I'm doing that day.  That means beyond the non-exercise daily 125 mg sublingual NMN, on cycling days I add 450-600 mgs NMN (in both powdered and sublingual), 400-800 mgs oral PeakATP, and a sublingual B12. The combo makes me a bit nervous feeling until I get going, but once in my workout it really seems to amp up the power and endurance I experience. Of course, that very subjective, but I do have data showing great improvement over time doing this.

 

Thanks. What's the 400-800 mgs oral PeakATP that you refer to?  I have never heard of that. 



#6 Oakman

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 04:38 AM

What are those latest findings that you refer to?  I'm also a little bit confused and concerned with Sinclair.  The things he says seem to leave people with more questions than answers sometimes. 


 

Thanks. What's the 400-800 mgs oral PeakATP that you refer to?  I have never heard of that. 

 

There are many products of ATP, some sublingual, some not. All the NAD+ precursors eventually help produce ATP, so .... here one way to get it directly. The theory is that some oral or sublingual ATP gets into the body to directly provide ATP where needed. 

 

Kind of iffy, but it's not that expensive, and as the claims (and some studies) are pretty awesome. Example:

 

Study shows effects of oral adenosine-5’-triphosphate supplementation on athletic performance, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and recovery in resistance-trained athletes: 

  • Increases total strength by 147%
  • Increases power by 30%
  • Increases lean body mass by 100%
  • Increases muscle thickness by 96%

http://www.peakatp.com/ < general about oral product

http://www.peakatp.c...a-2013-wilson/ < one study

 

https://www.douglasl...om/atp-20.html < a sublingual product

https://www.douglasl...ia/DL83029.pdf < product sheet

 

I found this primer on ATP, NAD, and FAD really understandable as you go through it you see how ATP is produced along the way during metabolism.

 

https://content.byui...tp_nad_fad.html


Edited by Oakman, 30 November 2018 - 04:41 AM.


#7 HaplogroupW

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Posted 30 November 2018 - 05:02 AM

 

I'm starting to take NMN and at this time wondering what (if any) benefits there would be to also taking Resveratrol?

 

Well there is some basis for the idea that resveratrol activates sirtuins, but the activity of sirtuins requires NAD+ as a cofactor, and short supply of it is a bottleneck. So if you can boost NAD+ from precursors one could mitigate that bottleneck.

 

But there are also reasons to think it doesn't pan out that way that have been discussed in many places on this forum. E.g. oral NR and NMN mostly get metabolized to nicotinamide (NAM) in the liver. NAM is one of the products of the reaction in which NAD+ and sirtuins are reactants. So as an application of le chatelier's principle, increasing the concentration of a reaction product (NAM) tends to drive the reaction to the left, i.e. inhibits the reaction we were trying to drive forward.

 

Much more could be said but at the end of it all I think there are more questions than answers.


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#8 Turnbuckle

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 05:38 PM

There are many products of ATP, some sublingual, some not. All the NAD+ precursors eventually help produce ATP, so .... here one way to get it directly. The theory is that some oral or sublingual ATP gets into the body to directly provide ATP where needed. 

 

Kind of iffy, but it's not that expensive, and as the claims (and some studies) are pretty awesome. Example:

 

Study shows effects of oral adenosine-5’-triphosphate supplementation on athletic performance, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and recovery in resistance-trained athletes: 

  • Increases total strength by 147%
  • Increases power by 30%
  • Increases lean body mass by 100%
  • Increases muscle thickness by 96%

 

 

 

 

The listed increases are marketing BS. The results were after 12 weeks of working out, and they represent the percent difference in the increase, not the percent overall difference. For instance, what is represented as an increase of "total strength by 147%" in the marketing, was 452.6 ± 25.9 for placebo and 494.7 ± 17.9 for the supplemented group. The total strength of the treated group was thus increased 9% over the placebo group. Considerably less than "awesome."

 

This was at 400 mg ATP dosed orally, once a day. The paper is here.


Edited by Turnbuckle, 05 January 2019 - 05:41 PM.

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#9 Oakman

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 10:43 PM

The listed increases are marketing BS. The results were after 12 weeks of working out, and they represent the percent difference in the increase, not the percent overall difference. For instance, what is represented as an increase of "total strength by 147%" in the marketing, was 452.6 ± 25.9 for placebo and 494.7 ± 17.9 for the supplemented group. The total strength of the treated group was thus increased 9% over the placebo group. Considerably less than "awesome."

 

This was at 400 mg ATP dosed orally, once a day. The paper is here.

 

Thanks for sticking the needle in that one! Seemed outrageous, should have caught that.. but hey... 9% more strength is at least believable.  If I was told a pill could let me lift 9% more weight? ...or peddle 9% longer....with no side effects...I'd say, "yes please!"


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