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HPN's new alternative NAD booster (NAD3)

nad3 nad booster

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#1 aribadabar

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 11:43 PM


Hello guys,

 

As you may have also received this new marketing material by HPN, I decided to open this thread to get our collective insight on this new NAD+ booster.

 

NAD3 is purported to be a novel and patented combination of 3 different ingredients: 

  • Teacrine
  • Wasabi (yes, the green stuff you get with sushi)
  • Copper Niacin

Do you think it is a marketing gimmick or a real breakthrough backed by science that surpasses the already known NR and NMN?

 

https://edu.hpnsuppl...s-basis-vs-nad3

 

 

 

The Next Step in NAD+ Boosters: NAD3

While Tru Niagen and Basis rely on one ingredient to boost NAD+ levels in humans, there is another option. 

NAD3 is a product that has recently entered the market as a unique competitor to other NR-based NAD+ boosters.

NAD3 uses a novel and patented combination of 3 different ingredients: 

  • Teacrine
  • Wasabi (yes, the green stuff you get with sushi)
  • Copper Niacin

On their own, each of these ingredients are all very powerful and interesting in terms of longevity, anti-inflammation, energy, metabolism, and brain performance.

But when they are combined in the specific dosages included with NAD3, the results they deliver are stunning. 

NAD3 is so extremely exciting because in its early tests, it appears to outperform NR on several important health and longevity-related cellular mechanisms. 

Let’s first take a look at the mechanism behind how NAD3 works to boost NAD+.

 

How NAD3 Boosts NAD+

To do that, think back to our analogy for NAD+ production inside the cell: it’s like an assembly line.

NR is just one of the parts that help the body create NAD+. 

Well, instead of just increasing one of the parts of the assembly line…

NAD3 is able to boost the entire assembly line, which is called the “salvage NAD biosynthetic pathway.”

This is the primary pathway that allows the body to create NAD+.  

From start to finish, each of the three ingredients inside NAD3 works on a different part of the salvage pathway to optimize NAD+ production, reduce oxidative stress, support a healthy metabolism, dramatically reduce inflammation, and fight the process of aging. 

 


Edited by aribadabar, 31 December 2018 - 11:44 PM.

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#2 LawrenceW

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 11:35 AM

How does NAD3 get inside the cell?



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#3 Oakman

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 03:41 PM

No wonder I crave sushi with lots of wasabi....


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#4 HaplogroupW

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 08:49 PM

I wonder what advantage there is of the copper(I) salt vs plain nicotinic acid. Search on copper nicotinate finds a few hits in protection from toxicity (mercury, flouracil, aflotoxin).

 

They present no data that I could find to back their claims of "clinically proven" and "NAD3 is so extremely exciting because in its early tests, it appears to outperform NR on several important health and longevity-related cellular mechanisms." In the absence of that data, or even a mechanistic explanation of why these three seemingly random things together would have some particular virtue, colour me suspicious.

 

 


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#5 Phoebus

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 09:41 PM

I wonder what advantage there is of the copper(I) salt vs plain nicotinic acid. Search on copper nicotinate finds a few hits in protection from toxicity (mercury, flouracil, aflotoxin).

 

 

 

wondering the same thing. Does the copper help to usher the niacin into places it would not ordinarily go? '

 

intriguing 



#6 able

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 10:30 PM

I wonder what advantage there is of the copper(I) salt vs plain nicotinic acid. Search on copper nicotinate finds a few hits in protection from toxicity (mercury, flouracil, aflotoxin).

 

They present no data that I could find to back their claims of "clinically proven" and "NAD3 is so extremely exciting because in its early tests, it appears to outperform NR on several important health and longevity-related cellular mechanisms." In the absence of that data, or even a mechanistic explanation of why these three seemingly random things together would have some particular virtue, colour me suspicious.

 

 

Well put.  I would like to believe they, Lawrence W, and others are finding new combinations that boost NAD+.  Surely there will be many at some point.

 

I do think HPN is a solid company, and I am always overly optimistic, so maybe I'll try one bottle.

 

But until they provide some  results on testing of their combination, links to research on the individual ingredients, or some reason how they are synergistic, it seems a bit random and doubt I'd try more than one bottle unless I notice something phenomenal.



#7 Oakman

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 11:07 PM

Cunermuspir aka copper niacin >  https://globenewswir...le-Patents.html

and

https://www.mitosynergy.com/  plus  https://www.bioavail...ablecopper.eu/ also  https://www.prweb.co...web12202464.htm

 

looks to be sold in other formulations like "MitoSynergy" including an extra strength formula with 1.9 mgs Niacin  / 500 mcgs Copper vs. HPN with 840 mcgs / 200 mcgs.

 

Looks like a copy of this: 

 

MitoSynergy is a nutritional supplement company bringing consumers a better quality of life. It is a proprietary blend of nutrients that has direct impact on human cell energy producers, the mitochondria. The confirmed efficacy of the combined nutrients in MitoSynergy may increase strength and energy while reducing discomfort and fatigue. MitoSynergy has a patent pending nutrient complex that is not found in any other product in the world, Cunermuspir Complex, containing Copper and B-3.


Edited by Oakman, 01 January 2019 - 11:11 PM.

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#8 LawrenceW

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 02:21 AM

Well put.  I would like to believe they, Lawrence W, and others are finding new combinations that boost NAD+.  Surely there will be many at some point.

 

 

 

Hello Able.

 

NMN does a great job of boosting NAD+.  What we are working on is keeping that boost sustained by preventing homeostasis from kicking in.


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#9 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 03:46 PM

Science or Gimmick?

 

All HPN needs to do to settle that question is to provide the research.

 

Until that happens, I'm going with gimmick.

 

 

 


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#10 Oakman

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 04:04 PM

I notice Cuprous Niacin is available here for biohackers. Mix with TeaCrine and a bit or true Wasabi and you are good to go. Only thing you will need is a good accurate scale.


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#11 Mind

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 05:23 PM

Science or Gimmick?

 

All HPN needs to do to settle that question is to provide the research.

 

Until that happens, I'm going with gimmick.

 

Ditto.


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#12 able

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 01:29 AM

Wow, really lost all confidence I had in HPN.

 

I notice they are selling this on Amazon, and using the 319 reviews they got for NR on this product listing.  Very deceptive.

 

Even worse, the top 2 bullets say:

 

 

  • THE WORLDS MOST EFFECTIVE NAD BOOSTER; The studies are in and the research is very clear, while nicotinamide riboside is effective, it is not the best cell health product on the market. NAD3 has advanced the science of NR and revolutionized health from within
  • THE NEXT EVOLUTION OF HPNs WORLD RENOWNED NIAGEN PRODUCT; In 2013, High Performance Nutrition released a product that changed everything we thought we knew about anti aging and longevity; NAD3 is the next, clinically superior evolution

 

Without posting  a single bit of research anywhere.

 

Amazon is great for getting lowest price on a known product.  

 

But any seller can make up totally unsupported claims, and it is very difficult for buyers to know the truth without a lot of time doing research.


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#13 aribadabar

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 03:03 AM

I found another page from HPN that goes a bit further into the research of NAD3: https://nad3.hpnsupplements.com/

 

 

Here is the comparison with the 2 other NAD+ boosters - looking at the dosages I'd surmise the 300mg product is NR and 125mg one is NMN

1546551040-38369256-829x695x914x707x0x0-

 

 

A small tidbit in the FAQ:

 

 

Is NAD3 clinically proven?

 

Yes. NAD3 has had clinical research conducted at Auburn University and The Center for Applied Health Science. The researched showed a boost in NAD+, Sirtuin activity, and inhibiting NLRP3.

 

 

Hopefully these trial results are published in peer-reviewed journals so we can identify them and read the whole methodology espoused.


Edited by aribadabar, 08 January 2019 - 03:04 AM.

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#14 LawrenceW

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 03:09 AM

I found another page from HPN that goes a bit further into the research of NAD3: https://nad3.hpnsupplements.com/

 

 

Here is the comparison with the 2 other NAD+ boosters - looking at the dosages I'd surmise the 300mg product is NR and 125mg one is NMN

1546551040-38369256-829x695x914x707x0x0-

 

 

 

 

I think that you are wrong on the 2nd column being NMN as the 125 mg dose of NMN that we are aware of is produced at a cGMP facility, has independent testing, is not yet backed by clinical data, does activate Sirtuins, protects telomeres, and reduces inflammation.



#15 LawrenceW

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 03:27 AM

This study just came out and shows that NMN actually boosts intracellular NAD+.

 

https://www.nature.c...2255-018-0009-4

 

I would still like to know the mechanism as to how 

  • Teacrine
  • Wasabi (yes, the green stuff you get with sushi)
  • Copper Niacin

boost intracellular levels of NAD+?


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#16 aribadabar

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 03:48 AM

I think that you are wrong on the 2nd column being NMN 

 

It's possible but if we assume that's NR what's the 300mg NAD+ booster? Plain old nicotinic acid or nicotinamide?

I am not aware of any other NAD+ precursor. What's your best guess?

 

 

I would still like to know the mechanism as to how 

  • Teacrine
  • Wasabi (yes, the green stuff you get with sushi)
  • Copper Niacin

boost intracellular levels of NAD+?

 

I agree. Until we see the studies behind NAD3 we can't.



#17 Mind

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 06:34 PM

I sent an email to them 5 days ago asking for references on their "clinical studies". No response.


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#18 bluemoon

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 09:52 PM

I sent an email to them 5 days ago asking for references on their "clinical studies". No response.

 

Thanks for asking Mind, but I guess I'll have to use my clout to get them to sing...



#19 Fredrik

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 12:58 AM

I emailed Mitosynergy about their cuprous nicotinate (could be the same copper nicotinate that is in NAD3 or maybe not) to see what they had to say.

 

To me, HPN NAD3 looks like every other Bodybuilding gimmicky supplement with a proprietary mix of exotic sounding botanicals and vitamins or minerals and a nice story that goes with it.

 

"Hi Fredrik, 
Thank you for reaching out to support. 

We don't claim that it increases NAD.
it aids in increasing ATP by way of cytochrome C oxidase in complex 4
of the electron transport chain.

If you have any other questions please let me know. 

Best,
 

(name removed)

Kind Regards,
MitoSynergy Support"

 

 

 


Edited by Fredrik, 10 January 2019 - 01:00 AM.

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#20 Fredrik

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 01:28 AM

HPN claims that Auburn University has studied their NAD3. Auburn University did a study to examine "the safety and non-habituating effects" of the caffeine derivative TeaCrine®. Says nothing about NAD or sirtuins.

 

I wonder if HPN first wanted to launch NAD3 as a thermogenic fat burning pill but saw a greater market opportunity in claiming "NAD boosting" effects. When Chromadex terminated HPN´s NR supply they had to come up with something I guess. Not necessarily something useful. Just something, to sell.

 

https://jissn.biomed...2970-016-0113-3

 

 


Edited by Fredrik, 10 January 2019 - 01:35 AM.

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#21 Fredrik

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 01:49 AM

I notice Cuprous Niacin is available here for biohackers. Mix with TeaCrine and a bit or true Wasabi and you are good to go. Only thing you will need is a good accurate scale.

 

The only thing you need is a scale? No evidence for the efficacy of these ingredients? Just a scale. 

 

WHY would you want to take cuprous nicotinate, the caffeine derivative TeaCrine and wasabi?


Edited by Fredrik, 10 January 2019 - 01:52 AM.


#22 Oakman

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 10:56 AM

The only thing you need is a scale? No evidence for the efficacy of these ingredients? Just a scale. 

 

WHY would you want to take cuprous nicotinate, the caffeine derivative TeaCrine and wasabi?

The point was (is) that all of the components of HPN's product are readily available, and specifically the cuprous niacin (which I'd not heard of before). Plus you'd need a really good scale because of the mcg quantities involved. Some may like to experiment, for their own reasons.

 

Beyond that, I personally love (real) wasabi, so there's at least one part of the formula with potential benefits...

 

https://www.mcgill.c...-health-benefit

 

"Wasabi has antimicrobial properties which may have safeguarded Japanese sushi eaters over the years. Specifically, “6-methylsulfinylhexyl isothiocyanate” has been identified in wasabi as an anti-microbial agent effective against bacteria such as E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This useful property has led to the ingenious development of using wasabi extract as a preservative in lunch bags in Japan.

 

On the western front, researchers are looking at isothiocyanate in particular as possibly targeting pathogenic Salmonella. Wasabi’s antimicrobial effect may yet be directed against another scourge, namely, tooth decay. According Dr. Hideki Masuda, isothiocyanate is effective in inhibiting Streptococcus mutans cell growth by interfering with the ability of bacterial cell to adhere to teeth. Other health benefits may include wasabi’s anti-cancer properties. Researchers have found that many human stomach cancer cells changed morphologically followed by cell death in a medium of wasabi extract. Besides the lachrymatory sensation, and clearing of the sinuses, there are no known side- effects attributed to wasabi consumption although some individuals may experience an allergic reaction."


Edited by Oakman, 10 January 2019 - 10:59 AM.

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#23 Fredrik

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 11:55 AM

As for now, I do not see why the supplement is marketed as a NAD booster. Let us see if HPN gets back to Mind (or me) with some answers. I read all the papers related to NAD precursors as they are published and I´ve never seen these ingredients come up even as a footnote in a review.


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#24 Mind

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 05:03 PM

Thanks for asking Mind, but I guess I'll have to use my clout to get them to sing...

 

Thanks. I hope you can pry some data from them. Good companies put all the data out there for their consumers. Hiding data is a bad sign.


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#25 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 07:02 PM

HPN claims that Auburn University has studied their NAD3. Auburn University did a study to examine "the safety and non-habituating effects" of the caffeine derivative TeaCrine®. Says nothing about NAD or sirtuins.

 

I wonder if HPN first wanted to launch NAD3 as a thermogenic fat burning pill but saw a greater market opportunity in claiming "NAD boosting" effects. When Chromadex terminated HPN´s NR supply they had to come up with something I guess. Not necessarily something useful. Just something, to sell.

 

https://jissn.biomed...2970-016-0113-3

 

 

If that's true then it just sinks HPN's credibility in my book.


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#26 Fredrik

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 12:39 PM

UPDATE:

 

hpnsupplements.com has completely ignored my request for details regarding their "clinical trial" of NAD3. I never believed they had something in the first place, but to be courteous I emailed them. This stinks to high heaven. I believe it is a complete scam. Stay away until there comes a company that can prove that they can influence NAMPT, CD38 or some other point in the metabolism of NAD.


Edited by Fredrik, 16 January 2019 - 12:57 PM.

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#27 accord

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 11:55 AM

Wow, really lost all confidence I had in HPN.

 

I notice they are selling this on Amazon, and using the 319 reviews they got for NR on this product listing.  Very deceptive.

 

 

They have 324 reviews AND if you search in the review, you can see that they are talking about Niagen, not Nad3.

 

How on earth can Amazon allow a huge scam like this? It's very possible that they are not aware of this, right?

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B00L5Q951S/


Edited by accord, 20 January 2019 - 11:56 AM.

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#28 aribadabar

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 12:48 AM

They have 324 reviews AND if you search in the review, you can see that they are talking about Niagen, not Nad3.

 

How on earth can Amazon allow a huge scam like this? It's very possible that they are not aware of this, right?

 

https://www.amazon.c.../dp/B00L5Q951S/

 

They are aware alright - I personally notified Amazon of this deceptive tactic that HPN espouses to flog their NAD3 concoction about a week ago when Able first alerted us of it.

I guess we need to email Jeff (jeff@amazon.com) directly to rectify this fraudulent practice.



#29 MoreGooderFuture

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 12:31 PM

Thanks for the replies to this topic.

What HPN is doing here is providing the "suppliments do nothing and are a scam" crowd with truly sound evidence in their favor.  HPN is attempting to pull of a scam that targets health-concience and somewhat informed customers with their brand name recognition.  We cannot, as consumers, let that go unnoticed.  I will also email Amazon to inform them of their deceptive reviews and non-existent clinical trials of NAD3.

 


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#30 MoreGooderFuture

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 01:00 PM

I've waged a personal war on the Amazon listing for this.  I'm going to shame the seller into deleting their misleading positive reviews for the main ingredient no longer present in their bottle.  Misleading reviews count as misleading advertisement in my opinion.

 


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