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Scientific evidence that various diets or foods are associated with increased longevity

longevity diet

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#1 Phoebus

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:08 PM


This thread is to post evidence that any diet or food item is associated with increased longevity. 

 

Please only post actual evidence, no keto evangelists ranting about keto (or whatever) lest you have actual evidence, thanks. 



#2 Phoebus

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:12 PM

 

When it comes to carbs, your best nutrition strategy might be the oldest one in the book: moderation.

That’s according to a new study published in The Lancet Public Health, which finds that people who get about half of their total calories from carbohydrates may be at a lower risk of early death than those who follow either very high- or very low-carb diets. The researchers estimated that people who ate a moderate amount of carbohydrates at age 50 had a life expectancy of around 83, compared to 82 for high-carb eaters and 79 for low-carb eaters.

For the study, researchers analyzed data provided by nearly 15,500 middle-aged U.S. adults participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. All of the participants completed a detailed diet questionnaire at the beginning of the study, then another six years later. They also provided information about their demographic background, education and income levels, smoking status, exercise habits and medical histories. The researchers then tracked them for about 25 years.

After adjusting for lifestyle factors, the researchers zeroed in on associations between carbohydrate intake and mortality. They found that mortality risk was higher for those on the high and low ends of the carb spectrum — that is, those who consumed more than 70% or less than 40% of their total calories from carbohydrates — than for those who drew between 50% and 55% of their caloric intake from carbs.

http://time.com/5369...s-healthy-diet/

 

 

 

People who eat a moderate amount of carbohydrates live longer than those who consume either very high or very low amounts of carbs, although the difference is not dramatic.  

 

study is here 

 

https://www.thelance...0135-X/fulltext



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#3 Phoebus

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:15 PM

 

But when suggesting which food component in the Greek variant of the Mediterranean Diet should have a priority, a new study (6) suggests legumes may be the most important for longevity. In the study, researchers analyzed food intake in 785 subjects living in Japan, Sweden, Greece, and Australia between 1988 and 1991, over the age of 70 in the “Food Habits in Later Life” (FHILL) study (7) and who were followed for 7 years. The researchers analyzed nine major food groups that included vegetables, legumes, fruits and nuts, milk and dairy products, cereals and potatoes, meat and meat products, ethanol, monounsaturated to saturated fats ratio, and fish groups.

Out of the 785 participants in the baseline, 169 people died during the follow-up period. The researchers found only legumes to provide a decreased risk of death (“reduction in mortality”) across the different cohorts of the study. Specifically, every 20-gram increase in legume consumption produced a 7-8% reduction in mortality with or without controlling for ethnicity (p = 0.02), while “other food groups were not found to be consistently significant in predicting survival amongst the FHILL cohorts”, including vegetable (p = 0.70), fruit and nut (p = 0.38), cereal (p = 0.78), dairy (p = 0.28), meat (p = 0.42), and fish intake (p = 0.20).

https://www.naturalh...rectors-choice/

 

 

Of nine major food groups only legume consumption predicted longevity  

 

full study here

 

http://www.naturalhe...to-Lifespan.pdf



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#4 Phoebus

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:28 PM

Of course we have to include the Meditteranian diet, thats a given. This study shows the diet  is associated with longer telomeres,  a biomarker linked to longevity.

 

 

 

Now it appears that the Mediterranean diet may also help protect your telomeres, according to a Harvard study published in the Dec. 2, 2014, BMJ. Telomeres sit at the ends of your chromosomes and help protect the ends from fraying. Telomere length is considered to be a biomarker of aging: shorter telomeres are associated with a lower life expectancy and higher rates of developing chronic diseases. After analyzing the detailed food questionnaires and telomere measurements of more than 4,600 women, Harvard researchers concluded that a greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomeres, and that even small changes in diet made a difference. The Mediterranean diet is rich in olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and fish; minimizes red meats and processed meats; and includes a moderate amount of cheese and wine.

https://www.health.h...ard-researchers

 

study here

 

https://www.bmj.com/...t/349/bmj.g6674



#5 Phoebus

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Posted 23 February 2019 - 04:39 PM

Coffee Drinkers Are More Likely To Live Longer. Decaf May Do The Trick, Too

 

 

The latest findings come from a study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine that included about a half-million people in England, Scotland and Wales. Participants ranged in age from 38 to 73.

 

"We found that people who drank two to three cups per day had about a 12 percent lower risk of death compared to non-coffee drinkers" during the decade-long study, says Erikka Loftfield, a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute.

This was true among all coffee drinkers — even those who were determined to be slow metabolizers of caffeine. (These are people who tend to be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine.) And the association held up among drinkers of decaffeinated coffee, too.

 

https://www.npr.org/...o-the-trick-too

 

study here

 

https://jamanetwork....bstract/2686145



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#6 Phoebus

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Posted 24 February 2019 - 04:18 AM

 

Presented at European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2018, the findings are part of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study. After analyzing the diets, mortality, and health outcomes of more than 138,500 people ages 35 to 70 worldwide for an average of nine years, the researchers identified seven key foods that were associated with a lower risk for premature death: vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, fish, and yes, dairy and non-processed red meat.

 

That is not carte blanche to subsist on sirloin and Swiss, of course, but the study does acknowledge that there is room for a wide range of whole foods in a healthful, disease-fighting diet.

Related: Take on a kick-ass workout designed to build strength and total-body fitness with Muscle After 40.

Specifically, the researchers found that those who consumed 8.4 servings of fruits and vegetables, 2.5 servings of nuts and legumes, 3 servings of dairy, 1.4 servings of red meat, and 0.3 servings of fish per day had a 25 percent lower risk of death than those who ate 1.8 servings of fruit and vegetables, 0.7 servings of nuts and legumes, 0.6 servings of dairy, 0.3 servings of red meat, and 0.2 servings of fish daily, according to the presentation.

When broken down into macronutrients, more fat and fewer carbs proved best. The people in the “healthiest” group consumed 54 percent of their diet from carbohydrates, 28 percent from fats, and 18 percent from protein. The least healthy ate nearly 70 percent of their diet in carbs, about 18 percent from fats, and 12 percent from protein.

https://www.bicyclin...ongevity-study/


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