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Fascinating: Caffeine consumption = shorter telomeres, However Coffee drinking = longer telomeres

coffee telomere

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#1 Phoebus

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 03:41 PM


Very interesting. First study shows that caffeine consumption accounts for shorter telomeres in U.S. adults, independent of numerous covariates, whereas coffee intake predicts longer telomeres.

 

Second study shows  that higher coffee consumption is associated with longer telomeres among female nurses.

 

So caffeine bad for telomeres, coffee good for telomeres 

 

 

 

Caffeine consumption and telomere length in men and women of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)  
 
Nutrition & Metabolism201714:10

https://doi.org/10.1...2986-017-0162-x

Background  

The investigation evaluated the relationship between caffeine intake and coffee consumption and leukocyte telomere length, a biomarker of the senescence of cells.

Methods  

A total of 5826 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were studied cross-sectionally. Using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction method, telomere length was compared to standard reference DNA. Caffeine intake from foods and beverages and coffee consumption were measured using a validated, multi-pass, computer-assisted, 24-h recall system administered by NHANES interviewers. The following covariates were controlled: age, gender, race, marital status, education, housing, smoking, BMI, physical activity, alcohol use, and coffee intake (or caffeine consumption).

Results  

Caffeine consumption was inversely related to telomere length (F = 15.1, P = 0.0005). For each 100 mg of caffeine consumed, telomeres were 35.4 base pairs shorter, after adjusting for the covariates. For each 100 mg of caffeine consumed among coffee drinkers only, telomeres were 36.7 base pairs shorter (F = 9.0, P = 0.0054), and among non-coffee drinkers only, 40.0 base pairs shorter (F = 8.5, P = 0.0067). Conversely, coffee intake was positively related to telomere length (F = 12.6, P = 0.0013), independent of the covariates.

Conclusions  

Results suggest that caffeine consumption accounts for shorter telomeres in U.S. adults, independent of numerous covariates, whereas coffee intake predicts longer telomeres

 

 .

 

J Nutr. 2016 Jul;146(7):1373-8. doi: 10.3945/jn.116.230490. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Coffee Consumption Is Positively Associated with Longer Leukocyte Telomere Length in the Nurses' Health Study.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Coffee is an important source of antioxidants, and consumption of this beverage is associated with many health conditions and a lower mortality risk. However, no study, to our knowledge, has examined whether varying coffee or caffeine consumption levels are associated with telomere length, a biomarker of aging whose shortening can be accelerated by oxidative stress.

OBJECTIVE:

We performed a large comprehensive study on how coffee consumption is associated with telomere length.

METHODS:

We used data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), a prospective cohort study of female nurses that began in 1976. We examined the cross-sectional association between coffee consumption and telomere length in 4780 women from the NHS. Coffee consumption information was obtained from validated food-frequency questionnaires, and relative telomere length was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Unconditional logistic regression was used to obtain ORs when the telomere length outcome was dichotomized at the median. Linear regression was used for tests of trend with coffee consumption and telomere length as continuous variables.

RESULTS:

Higher total coffee consumption was significantly associated with longer telomeres after potential confounding adjustment. Compared with non-coffee drinkers, multivariable ORs for those drinking 2 to <3 and ≥3 cups of coffee/d were, respectively, 1.29 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.68) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.78) (P-trend = 0.02). We found a significant linear association between caffeine consumption from all dietary sources and telomere length (P-trend = 0.02) after adjusting for potential confounders, but not after additionally adjusting for total coffee consumption (P-trend = 0.37).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that higher coffee consumption is associated with longer telomeres among female nurses. Future studies are needed to better understand the influence of coffee consumption on telomeres, which may uncover new knowledge of how coffee consumption affects health and longevity.

 


  • Informative x 2

#2 illerrre

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 09:53 AM

Could someone help me understand this, because I don't get it. 

Caffeine: 35.4 shorter
Coffee: 36.7 shorter
No coffee: 40.0 shorter

Since 35.4 is the smallets number here and shortening is a bad thing, isn't caffeine the best?

What am I missing? 






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