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Anyone interested in a CRH antagonist for dysfunctional stress response?

cortisol crh antalarmin

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33 replies to this topic

#31 kurdishfella

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 10:47 AM

I just wanted to show this https://www.indigo.u...dle/10027/21989

 

 

 

Lmo3Z mice had a reduction of Crhr1 mRNA and CRF1R protein expression in the BLA. Additionally, Lmo3Z mice showed a reduction of Crhr1 mRNA in the CeA, increased Gabra4 mRNA in the BLA, and a sex-specific increase in Gabrd mRNA in the BLA of only females. No corresponding changes in protein expression were observed for these ge

I really think the LMO3 gene is a big factor in anxiety, too much or too little of this is bad but a balance is needed. I post this again because the first time I mentioned this I didn't know it also reduced crhr1 in the central amygdala. So you got this gene which regulates crhr1/crf1 in both parts of the amygdala, and we know blocking crhr1 shows a blunted stress response.



#32 gamesguru

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 11:30 PM

Of course Quercetin is generally recognized as safe, haha!  In both Western and Eastern diets, It's the second most abundant polyphenol!

 

 

To the OP:  How can you be sure you aren't suffering from a lack of cortisol sensitivity?  Seems counter-intuitive yes, but in fact many disorders (ADHD included) are linked to a state of heightened cortisol activity and lowered responsiveness.

 

This study was puzzling when at first I became aware of it in late 2016:  Cortisol Response to Stress in Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder



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#33 kurdishfella

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Posted 04 January 2020 - 02:31 PM

https://www.scienced...306453019301714

 

This study must have come out a few days ago? From what I understand if you are deficient in LMO3 you have a hard time controlling your emotions and perhaps overcoming fear? 

 

Absence of Lmo3 impairs amygdala LTP.
 
So the opposite too much LMO3 leads to too much Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the amygdala leading to anxiety (due to excess CRHR1)? Basically over-active amygdala because of persistent increase in synaptic strength following high-frequency stimulation of a chemical synapse from the outside?
 
Can anyone find if the other LMO genes specifically LMO1 has a role in anxiety any studies on that? (LMO2 & LMO4 too).
 
 

Edited by farshad, 04 January 2020 - 02:38 PM.


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#34 kurdishfella

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Posted 05 January 2020 - 07:42 PM

If anyone know of any other genes that regulates CRF1 or CRH signaling/amount specifically in the amygdala let me know,


Edited by farshad, 05 January 2020 - 07:42 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: cortisol, crh, antalarmin

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