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4 years of Stimulation.. High Adrenaline, High Cortisol

adrenaline cortisol wired fatiuge

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#1 MARm

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 10:25 PM


TLDR at the bottom. Thanks in advance. 28, Male, 182cm, 18 stone (was 12 previously), White, Duration 4 years/5,

Current medications; Xanax, Doxazosin, Escoltapram (Tried 30 + mediations listed below)

Smoke lightly, drink to crash this wired existence once a week.

 

 

Complaint: Stimulated beyond belief 24/7 until after many days no sleep and stimulation, I crash. Sweating, tremors, fatigue, weight gain, dilated pupils, adrenaline rushes, bladder shrinkage, depersonalization, anxiety, depression, etc.

The above makes sense, as my Cortisol and Adrenaline is high, but WHY? What is causing this, is there a condition that I fit into, I've spent 4 years, many thousands and free health care, everyone agrees it's extreme (been hospitalised etc) but no one on earth seems to know what it is.

I've had had EEG's, MRI's, CT's, Endo's, P Docs, Cardiologist, GP's.

 

Ruled out: Phaeochromocytoma, Cushing's, Thyroid Glands (CT + Bloods), Adrenaline (CT + Bloods), Bipolar, POTS (tilt test etc), Autoimmune disorders (Bloods etc). Amongst many other things.

Now, after 4 years what we know on paper is my adrenaline is high, "Plasma adrenaline – HIGH - rose to 568 above the normal range of 0-459 No nocturnal fall – On the 24-hr BP/HR autonomic profiles mean daytime BP was 133/92 and HR 88, without the expected nocturnal fall. Worse when standing, The BP was elevated at times when he was polysymptomatic, the highest being 162/101 when standing. No evidence of autonomic failure".

We also know that every time I do a urine test for Cortisol it is above the range slightly.

 

But we can't pin this to anything, for instance as well as being stimulated I am now allergic to pseudoephedrine and ADHD stimulants, which they tried amongst many other things to see how I'd react. One doctor said I seem "Angernegic" but couldn't label me with any condition, my own GP is now reading about Adrenaline Fatigue, as he said the other something like "I never believed it was a thing until I've spent 2 years on your case".

 

Waiting on Spit test this upcoming week for:

lgA

Coristol 

DHEA 

 

Medications tried: 

 

No change:

 

Lithium (Highest dose), Melatonin, Depakote, Quetiapine (50 to 800mg,), Lamotrigine (couldn’t tolerate), Olanzapine 20mg, Buspirone /Promethazine/Buspirone/ Diphenhydramine (makes my heart jump) Mirtazapine, Zopliclones (15mg), Zoloft.

 

More Wired/Stimulated:

Elvanse, Backlofen, Phuesdephridrine (Sodafed), Guanfacine, Coffee, Clonidine

Descriptio Clonidine

 

Slightly helpful: Propranolol 80mg for shakes, Clonazepam

 

Sometimes lower stimulation for a few hours;

Xanax, Doxazosin

 

TLDR;

High Corisol and Adrenaline in urine and blood respectively, what could I have that isn't ruled out (Phaeochromocytoma, Cushing's, Thyroid Glands (CT + Bloods), Adrenaline (CT + Bloods), Bipolar, POTS (tilt test etc), Autoimmune disorders (Bloods etc). 



#2 ta5

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 12:14 AM

I wonder if you have COMT mutations and so you don't break down adrenaline. You could get a 23andme test and find out. 


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#3 MARm

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 12:30 AM

I wonder if you have COMT mutations and so you don't break down adrenaline. You could get a 23andme test and find out. 

 

Very interesting, but unfortunately it doesn't fit,  sorry I didn't include a bit of backstory: 

 

Was stressed for two years, college, long break up, you know them things, moving etc but I had a pretty good year after that, no stimulation, defiantly had unearthed some anxiety, however it took a year for the stimulation thing to kick in. 

 

I'd give in and say "anxiety disorder" but 8 Physiatrist and my current Endocrinologist don't think so because the levels. My Endo said "Anxiety disorders don't show up on 24 hour cortisol" and a autoimmune doctor in London (cost £1,200!) said the same thing about having no nocturnal fall. 

 

I don't even know what type of Doctor I am looking for anymore, I've seen a staggering amount, been to St.Mary's (where the Royals in the UK have kids), Harley Street (like the most upmarket place) and changed GP 5 times.


Edited by MARm, 30 October 2019 - 12:42 AM.


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#4 ta5

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 02:31 AM

I shouldn't have made it seem absolute. COMT mutations don't make it so you don't break down adrenaline at all. It makes it so you don't break it down as fast or as easily as someone without COMT mutations.

 

I have them and it's only a problem when I'm under a lot of stress and uncertainty. Other times, I'm perfectly fine. I just went through a period where I was maybe going to lose my job, and maybe my housing. I was sleeping only half the night and waking up with my heart beating too fast and not being able to get back to sleep. My heart rate was not super fast, but too fast for the middle of the night when I should be relaxed. A few nights I didn't sleep at all. It's like I'm in a higher gear all the time. I have cut out all COMT inhibitors that I know of, like tea, cacao, Quercetin, and others. Beta blockers help a lot, obviously since they block adrenaline.

 

Even if you don't have any COMT mutations, there's something going on with adrenaline, and you might want to do all you can to keep it low.

 

It could be MAO mutations too. You might want to avoid Tyramine and MAO inhibitors, and possibly take things to increase MAO. You might try the low-Tyramine diet like people go on for headaches. 

 

https://selfhacked.c...omt-v158m-gene/

https://selfhacked.c...ine-deficiency/

 

 



#5 MARm

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 06:36 PM

I shouldn't have made it seem absolute. COMT mutations don't make it so you don't break down adrenaline at all. It makes it so you don't break it down as fast or as easily as someone without COMT mutations.

 

I have them and it's only a problem when I'm under a lot of stress and uncertainty. Other times, I'm perfectly fine. I just went through a period where I was maybe going to lose my job, and maybe my housing. I was sleeping only half the night and waking up with my heart beating too fast and not being able to get back to sleep. My heart rate was not super fast, but too fast for the middle of the night when I should be relaxed. A few nights I didn't sleep at all. It's like I'm in a higher gear all the time. I have cut out all COMT inhibitors that I know of, like tea, cacao, Quercetin, and others. Beta blockers help a lot, obviously since they block adrenaline.

 

Even if you don't have any COMT mutations, there's something going on with adrenaline, and you might want to do all you can to keep it low.

 

It could be MAO mutations too. You might want to avoid Tyramine and MAO inhibitors, and possibly take things to increase MAO. You might try the low-Tyramine diet like people go on for headaches. 

 

https://selfhacked.c...omt-v158m-gene/

https://selfhacked.c...ine-deficiency/

 

See beta blockers only half help, i'm living of Xanax and the odd beta blocker when my tremors go bad. 

 

I will defiantly look into this diet as I have headaches like mad. 

 

One thing i'm confused about from reading that, I have HIGH Adrenaline and High Cortisol so I thought that meant I had High Norepinephrine? 

 

Or is it the other way around, Do I want MORE Norepinphrine to cope with and it's the good guy? 



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#6 MARm

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 07:14 PM

A doctor online has just said that he believes I have Cushings Syndrome not disease and it's very rare around 40 in 1 million when i looked up an article. 

I fit it almost exactly and all my tests minus one test I haven't done show positive for this. 

 

24-hour urinary free-cortisol test

Mine is above range

Late-night salivary cortisol test

My cortisol doesn't drop in 24 hours

Low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) *haven't done*

In this test, you will take a low dose of dexamethasone, a type of glucocorticoid, usually around 11:00 p.m. A health care professional will draw your blood the following morning, usually around 8 a.m. Sometimes doctors use another type of LDDST test, in which you take dexamethasone every 6 hours for 48 hours. Your blood is drawn 6 hours after the last dose.

Normally, cortisol levels in the blood drop after taking dexamethasone. Cortisol levels that don’t drop suggest Cushing’s syndrome.







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