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Is There Deliberate Deception In Supplement Reporting Results?

cancer apoptosis

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#1 eighthman

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 03:54 AM


I offer this as an example of something I keep noticing:  negative reports made on inexpensive possible disease treatments that appear to be deceptive.

 

https://worldteanews...t-a-cancer-cure

 

Someone comes up with a potential cure or treatment - that looks inexpensive and/or simple.  Soon after, seemingly official statements are made that deny its efficacy EVEN THOUGH it has not been demonstrated to be ineffective (" but it is not a cancer cure")

 

Again, there is a difference between "there is no evidence"  (meaning, at present, we don't know one way or the other) and saying "it doesn't work" ( meaning it has been actually been proven ineffective).

 

In addition, I wonder when an inexpensive drug seems to be effective and is then followed by "but there is no evidence" but is then tested in combination with a more profitable drug in a clinical trial.  Perhaps this is a (somewhat) reasonable compromise to establish a drug combination while preserving an established profit source.

 

My main interest is in anti-aging but incidents such as above make me wonder as to "the whole truth and nothing but the truth" about various supplements and regimens that are otherwise affected by negative statements expressed with confidence.


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#2 Oakman

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 04:55 PM

This is the life in a world with profit motive, high study costs of development, and rigorous scientific proof needed before FDA blessing. Worse, as you mention, but also combinations of supplement and/or drugs are rarely studied. So while one stand alone molecule may not be effective (or effective enough), some combo may be but is never tested. The result: there are innumerable combinations of likely effective molecules that will never be 'proven' effective for anything one way or the other.


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#3 Mind

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Posted 18 February 2020 - 06:27 PM

In contrast, vast literature indicates that statins are barely effective and come with significant side effects, yet are promoted around the world as a magic bullet to cure heart disease.

 

Like Oakman said, the profit motive can distort what is considered a favorable result. That being said - the profit motive (free markets - capitalism) has brought us a phenomenal amount of progress thus far in human history.


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#4 Turnbuckle

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Posted 19 February 2020 - 01:46 PM

In contrast, vast literature indicates that statins are barely effective and come with significant side effects, yet are promoted around the world as a magic bullet to cure heart disease.

 

 

 

 

I look forward to the day when class action lawsuits are filed and these purveyors of poison are taken down.


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#5 eighthman

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Posted 19 February 2020 - 02:10 PM

I do recall a study that said that statins had no overall effect on mortality.

 

Years ago, when I was looking for some effective treatment for MS, I recall that I witnessed almost no studies of simple, cheap possible therapies - while various versions of interferon were tested again and again, as if trying to get a positive outcome somehow, as if by accident. 

 

I was encouraged by apparent recent studies looking at mebendazole, at least in combination with other cancer drugs.  I think there was a groundswell of unofficial use that forced this to happen.


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