• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Do you think taking NAD+ would cause your body to ramp down production of NAD, just like if you took steroids?

nad

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
5 replies to this topic

#1 Phoebus

  • Guest
  • 704 posts
  • 161
  • Location:Upper Midwest, US

Posted 02 July 2020 - 08:53 PM


Everyone knows if you take steroids your own body ramps down steroid production and eventually you might become totally dependant on exogenous steroids. 

 

Do you think something similar could happen with taking NAD+? 

 

I am NOT talking about the precursors NR/NMN, I am talking about actual NAD+ such as is in ABN's liposomal sublingual gel which I am taking twice a day and love it. 

 

But just wondering about the homeostasis effect of exogenous NAD+ and if you could actually become dependant on it



#2 joesixpack

  • Member
  • 128 posts
  • 4
  • Location:arizona
  • NO

Posted 09 July 2020 - 02:41 AM

You may be right about reducing NAD+ production. I have a thyroid hormone deficit. They dose the thyroid replacement hormone based on the levels of the precursor hormone for thyroid production, and try to match what is being called for by the TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) to what is being produced. Sometime it goes up and sometimes it goes down. But the treatment does not try to simply replace natural thyroid production. That is why I take a NAD+ precursor rather than trying to replace it directly.



#3 MikeDC

  • Guest
  • 1,485 posts
  • -463
  • Location:Virginia

Posted 11 July 2020 - 06:51 PM

Everyone knows if you take steroids your own body ramps down steroid production and eventually you might become totally dependant on exogenous steroids.

Do you think something similar could happen with taking NAD+?

I am NOT talking about the precursors NR/NMN, I am talking about actual NAD+ such as is in ABN's liposomal sublingual gel which I am taking twice a day and love it.

But just wondering about the homeostasis effect of exogenous NAD+ and if you could actually become dependant on it


Exogenous NAD+ acts as precursor to NR. It is degraded to NR and NAM before entering cells.
  • dislike x 1

#4 Phoebus

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 704 posts
  • 161
  • Location:Upper Midwest, US

Posted 11 July 2020 - 08:00 PM

Exogenous NAD+ acts as precursor to NR. It is degraded to NR and NAM before entering cells.

 

 

Your source for that? 



#5 Phoebus

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 704 posts
  • 161
  • Location:Upper Midwest, US

Posted 12 July 2020 - 12:57 AM

Exogenous NAD+ acts as precursor to NR. It is degraded to NR and NAM before entering cells.

 

 

this study suggest exogenous NAD can be directly taken up by nerve cells, at least in mice 

 

https://www.scienced...026049518301732

 

 

 

Extracellular NAD was imported into N1 hypothalamic neuronal cells in a connexin 43-dependent and CD73-independent manner. 
Exogenous NAD is effectively transported to the hypothalamus via a connexin 43-dependent mechanism and increases hypothalamic NAD content. Therefore, NAD supplementation is a potential therapeutic method for metabolic disorders characterized by hypothalamic NAD depletion.

 

not only that but it seems it can easily move past the BBB and increase brain levels of NAD+


  • Agree x 1

#6 able

  • Guest
  • 821 posts
  • 381
  • Location:austin texas
  • NO

Posted 13 July 2020 - 12:28 AM

this study suggest exogenous NAD can be directly taken up by nerve cells, at least in mice 

 

https://www.scienced...026049518301732

 

 

not only that but it seems it can easily move past the BBB and increase brain levels of NAD+

 

Yes, I've seen several studies where NAD+ enters cells in heart through cx-43 channel, hypothalamus, and other tissue types.

 

Even in cells where NMN and NAD+ must convert to NR to enter, there is an enzyme on the cell surface that does the trick easily, such that NAD+ was equal to and NMN was MORE effective than NR at restoring NAD+ inside the cell.

 

 

Chromadex has  started saying "NMN is a precursor to NR" as a marketing concept, even though they know it is not an important point.

 

Any slight advantage it may have at speed of entering some cells is  totally meaningless when you know that NR is very unstable in liquid and DOES NOT EXIST in the bloodstream.  


  • Good Point x 4
  • Disagree x 1





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nad

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users