• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Covid Vaccine Raynaud's

coronavirus

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Heisok

  • Guest
  • 582 posts
  • 173
  • Location:U.S.
  • NO

Posted 19 February 2021 - 06:33 PM


Hi,

 

Has anybody heard of reactions to either Covid vaccines by somebody with Raynaud's?

Also generally reactions to any vaccine for those with Raynaud's? Raynaud's can be a type of Autoimmune disorder, or secondary to another Autoimmune disorder.

 

Got a call from somebody with Raynaud's who had a delayed reaction after getting vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine. They got home, and had numbness in both hands and feet. I am not sure how long it took to go away, but it did.  They called due to knowing others with Raynaud's. Raynauds sucks, and can cause great issues to the effected extremities. The new person is scheduled to be vaccinated tomorrow. They might cancel.

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks.

 

 


Edited by Heisok, 19 February 2021 - 06:34 PM.

  • Informative x 1

#2 Heisok

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 582 posts
  • 173
  • Location:U.S.
  • NO

Posted 19 February 2021 - 11:15 PM

I looked on line, and can not find anything that would cause them to worry  in the short run about getting a vaccine in spite of having Raynaud's. Who knows about what might happen in the long run. They are calling their Rheumatologist to see what they say.

 

On a UK forum site, there are at least several people with Scleroderma and/or Raynaud's or other Autoimmune issues who have reported their experience with the Covid vaccine. Nothing extreme.

 

https://healthunlocked.com/sruk/posts

 

 



#3 Heisok

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 582 posts
  • 173
  • Location:U.S.
  • NO

Posted 20 February 2021 - 02:28 AM

From the Rheumatologist.:

 

"Here is some info with regards to your rheumatologic condition:
The data about the COVID vaccine suggests it is generally safe but we do not know how well it will work in people with autoimmune diseases or if they will be more or less likely to have side effects or a reaction to the vaccination. However, since COVID 19 can cause severe illness with some people dying, and immunosuppression increases the risk of COVID, benefit of the vaccine is likely greater than the risk of the vaccine in people with autoimmune illnesses taking medicines that suppress the immune system."

 

 

Here is additional information. The link is to a pdf file:

 

"February 2021 update: Information from the American College of Rheumatology Regarding Vaccination Against SARS-CoV-2"
 

https://www.rheumato...-SARS-CoV-2.pdf

 

Clinical Questions

Note: The ACR is developing a guidance document on the use of SARS-CoV-2 virus vaccination in patients with rheumatic disease that will be available in the first quarter of 2021.

 

Should patients continue their immunosuppressive therapy before and after vaccination?

 

No data specific to vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 are available at this time but there are plans for studies on the effects of immunosuppression on vaccine response. The CDC
does offer vaccination guidance in immunosuppressed individuals, although the document does not specifically discuss SARS-CoV-2 vaccination (www.cdc.gov).

 

Are patients with autoimmune conditions at risk of disease flare after receiving the SARS- CoV-2 vaccine?

 

The risk of disease flare is unknown currently. There are plans to study the impact of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination on autoimmune disease activity.

 

 

According to the document.

Where vaccine development stands (as of February 1, 2021)
The 5 phase 3 vaccines in the US, and their latest developments include the following:
• Pfizer and BioNTech have collaboratively produced an mRNA vaccine that was given emergency use approval by the FDA. Vaccinations are in progress across the United States.
• Moderna has produced an mRNA vaccine that was granted emergency use approval by the FDA. Vaccinations are in progress across the United States.
• Janssen has recently released significantly positive data from their global Phase 3 study of their single injection, adenovirus-based viral vector vaccine. Janssen is expected to apply for EUA from the FDA in early February.
• Novavax has completed Phase 3 Studies of their vaccine candidate in the United Kingdom (UK) and continues to enroll patients in a similar Phase 3 study in the US and Mexico. This vaccine is a two-shot protein subunit vaccine that has demonstrated very positive results in the UK. Novavax will await results from their Phase 3 study in the US and Mexico before applying for EUA with the FDA.
• AstraZeneca's two-shot adenovirus viral vector vaccine has been approved for use in the UK but is still completing a US based study. Some have estimated it may be until April before the steps for approval for EUA in the US have been completed.

 

"Types of vaccines
The vaccines currently in phase 3 trials fit into one of three basic categories: mRNA vaccines, protein subunit vaccines and adenovirus vector vaccines. All accomplish the goal of induction of immunity but achieve that goal through different techniques

.

Messenger RNA vaccines include mRNA (wrapped in a lipid nanoparticle) that gets incorporated into human cells upon vaccination. In the case of SARS-CoV-2, this mRNA typically encodes for the viral spike protein. The mRNA instructs the host cell to produce the spike protein, which stimulates an immune response that will ultimately provide protection against SARS-CoV-2.

 

Protein subunit vaccines contain purified viral protein (often the spike protein) subunits which are often accompanied by an adjuvant to boost the immune response. The protein is processed by the immune system to trigger a protective immune response.

 

Vector vaccines use a separate viral vector that has been engineered to code for proteins from the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Two of the vaccines in phase 3 trials use a replication-defective adenovirus vector that has been altered to code for the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Once the vector infects the host cell, its DNA enters the host cell nucleus. The host then produces the protein from SARS-CoV-2 which elicits an immune response and protection against COVID-19. The adenovirus does not modify the host genome.

 


Edited by Heisok, 20 February 2021 - 02:48 AM.

  • Informative x 1
  • like x 1

#4 joesixpack

  • Member
  • 161 posts
  • 14
  • Location:arizona
  • NO

Posted 06 March 2021 - 02:47 AM

I looked on line, and can not find anything that would cause them to worry  in the short run about getting a vaccine in spite of having Raynaud's. Who knows about what might happen in the long run. They are calling their Rheumatologist to see what they say.

 

On a UK forum site, there are at least several people with Scleroderma and/or Raynaud's or other Autoimmune issues who have reported their experience with the Covid vaccine. Nothing extreme.

 

https://healthunlocked.com/sruk/posts

 

I have Raynaud's, triggered by being chilled.

 

I have had both shots and no Raynaud reaction.


Edited by joesixpack, 06 March 2021 - 02:48 AM.

  • Informative x 2

#5 Heisok

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 582 posts
  • 173
  • Location:U.S.
  • NO

Posted 07 March 2021 - 02:39 AM

Thanks joesixpack,

 

They also had no issues with Raynaud's.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: coronavirus

2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users