• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Vitamin Quantities: Reversing Damaged Skin vs Maintainence?

aging collagen wrinkles fine lines reversing damage maintenance

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 4EverAsked4ID

  • Guest
  • 5 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Vitamin Aisle
  • NO

Posted 09 March 2021 - 08:32 PM


Hopefully this post doesn't come across as ignorant, though I pretty much just started diving into researching all of this. Of course this applies more so for the people who started their vitamin routines while relatively young, like mid 20s or so, where you are starting to see the first signs of aging but aren't decrepit or past the point of saving. One of the main things I am trying to reverse are fine lines on my forehead (I am 27) - their appearance seems to fluctuate all the time from being barely visible to looking like I dragged a knife across my head. I don't know if those are completely reversible, at least as far as my current age goes, since I know they are inevitable at some point, but hypothetically for the point of this post, let's just say they are completely reversible - to do that, I would assume you would likely need to take a much higher dose of collagen, hyaluronic acid, astaxanthin, etc. than you would if you didn't have any obvious damage you were trying to undo, but you wouldn't need to keep that up forever, right? I am unaware of what the body does with the supplements, in terms of does it use everything you give it, and all the reserves of it are empty by the time you take the next dose and so on, so I guess I am wondering if a lot of routines people do on this site are actually overkill? It would make sense that if you only have a little damage, that you could heal most of it, but if you're taking supplements everyday for years, are you always just postponing a decline because you're not allowing your body to have less of the required minerals/proteins, etc.? I always kind of assumed all the supplementation was just replacing what your body stops producing enough of when you get older, but I guess since even among the people who take tons of pills, not everyone looks age defying, that isn't the whole picture.

 

Hopefully what I'm asking makes sense.

 

 


Edited by 4EverAsked4ID, 09 March 2021 - 08:38 PM.


#2 bosharpe

  • Guest
  • 238 posts
  • 9
  • Location:UK
  • NO

Posted 10 March 2021 - 10:27 AM

White Jelly Mushroom (between 500mg - 1g) is a good supplement for skin. 



sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for AGELESS LOOKS to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 Qowpel

  • Guest
  • 344 posts
  • 27
  • Location:New jersey

Posted 16 March 2021 - 10:46 PM

I assume these are showing up due to accumulated damage as well as the inability of your body to handle such damage and keep up with it (meaning repair mecahnisms are likely less as you get older hence the here and there wrinkles.)...

 

Here is what I would do. Slow the damage using a good sunscreen from now, till forever (to slow the ability of it getting worse, as well as discouraging even more new damage). Great investment.

 

Then, I would simply try to wake up the fibroblasts through greater consistent intake of vitamin c, as well as once per  week, dermastamping. Sure it may be your new minimum to keep them at bay, but this routine would only take a little bit of effort over the long term. (I also know that MSM supplementation causes methylation which may be bad for longevity in the long term, so I personally take only 0.5 grams, to 1 gram daily. Skin always looks amazing when consistently using it, as it helps collagen formation, as well as helping the skin create glucosamine, and hyaluronic acid.

 

In addition, consistently intermittent fasting Always makes my skin look considerably more youthful, as well as some longer water fasts. 

 

So I do all of these things simply because sure, I am almost certain my skin now at 29.3 years old would start to decline without them, but I would not know because years ago I decided to simply do them daily.

 

My idea here is to just assume these will never go away on their own, and to just do a new routine to make it better, then maintain said routine to continue maintaining a more youthful look, as well as at least getting the guarantee of slowing further aging. Good luck bosharpe!

 

 


  • Ill informed x 1

#4 4EverAsked4ID

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 5 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Vitamin Aisle
  • NO

Posted 17 March 2021 - 05:56 AM

I assume these are showing up due to accumulated damage as well as the inability of your body to handle such damage and keep up with it (meaning repair mecahnisms are likely less as you get older hence the here and there wrinkles.)...

 

Here is what I would do. Slow the damage using a good sunscreen from now, till forever (to slow the ability of it getting worse, as well as discouraging even more new damage). Great investment.

 

Then, I would simply try to wake up the fibroblasts through greater consistent intake of vitamin c, as well as once per  week, dermastamping. Sure it may be your new minimum to keep them at bay, but this routine would only take a little bit of effort over the long term. (I also know that MSM supplementation causes methylation which may be bad for longevity in the long term, so I personally take only 0.5 grams, to 1 gram daily. Skin always looks amazing when consistently using it, as it helps collagen formation, as well as helping the skin create glucosamine, and hyaluronic acid.

 

In addition, consistently intermittent fasting Always makes my skin look considerably more youthful, as well as some longer water fasts. 

 

So I do all of these things simply because sure, I am almost certain my skin now at 29.3 years old would start to decline without them, but I would not know because years ago I decided to simply do them daily.

 

My idea here is to just assume these will never go away on their own, and to just do a new routine to make it better, then maintain said routine to continue maintaining a more youthful look, as well as at least getting the guarantee of slowing further aging. Good luck bosharpe!

 

Not sure if I can "reply" without quoting your whole post, but thanks for the post.

 

I started taking 1000mg of Vitamin C a day around 2 weeks ago and am on day 9 of superdosing with collagen (20 grams), which has made my hair look a lot nicer and the skin everywhere but my face looks clearer and feels pretty soft. Accumulated muscle tension has been one thing I think is often overlooked for causing wrinkles, since I am often contorting my face when doing nothing, so I've resumed digging my knuckles into my eyebrow area since that's where most of the tension is.

 

I've used sunscreen for a few years during Spring and Summer, since I live where the sun pretty much disappears altogether for 4 months straight and it does help prevent darkened skin and freckles, since I am pretty pale, but I don't think the sun would really affect forehead lines for me because that area is always covered by hair.

 

I have pretty much never eaten lunch my whole life, which is probably why I'm so short, though I've read opposing views that say a faster metabolism is a healthier thing to have, but there are contradicting points for everything, so who knows.

 

As for my routine in general, I'll keep up the Vitamin C, probably give the high collagen dose another 2 weeks to see if there's any great benefit (I read the high dose was supposed to help your whole body) and then go back to 6 grams a day - I also ordered Hyaluronic Acid, L-Lysine, and Krill Oil with Astaxanthin, so I will post about their affect a few weeks after they arrive.



#5 Qowpel

  • Guest
  • 344 posts
  • 27
  • Location:New jersey

Posted 17 March 2021 - 07:29 AM

Not sure if I can "reply" without quoting your whole post, but thanks for the post.

 

I started taking 1000mg of Vitamin C a day around 2 weeks ago and am on day 9 of superdosing with collagen (20 grams), which has made my hair look a lot nicer and the skin everywhere but my face looks clearer and feels pretty soft. Accumulated muscle tension has been one thing I think is often overlooked for causing wrinkles, since I am often contorting my face when doing nothing, so I've resumed digging my knuckles into my eyebrow area since that's where most of the tension is.

 

I've used sunscreen for a few years during Spring and Summer, since I live where the sun pretty much disappears altogether for 4 months straight and it does help prevent darkened skin and freckles, since I am pretty pale, but I don't think the sun would really affect forehead lines for me because that area is always covered by hair.

 

I have pretty much never eaten lunch my whole life, which is probably why I'm so short, though I've read opposing views that say a faster metabolism is a healthier thing to have, but there are contradicting points for everything, so who knows.

 

As for my routine in general, I'll keep up the Vitamin C, probably give the high collagen dose another 2 weeks to see if there's any great benefit (I read the high dose was supposed to help your whole body) and then go back to 6 grams a day - I also ordered Hyaluronic Acid, L-Lysine, and Krill Oil with Astaxanthin, so I will post about their affect a few weeks after they arrive.

 

 

Faster metabolisms cause faster aging. Slwoing metabolism allows for slower aging as the division of cells slows, and also allows for more autopagy to take place. Please do some research on fasting, CD38, NAD levels, etc, and the rationale for slowing aging behind them. 

Hair is not a reliable UVA filter. It can block some surely, but not all. Regardless of how your hair is styled I reccomend using UVA blocking sunscreen daily, whether inside or outside (if inside there is a window, those rays bounce all over the room and you are still exposed. Just wear it every day. Trust me. You do NOT wanna get to the point you neglect using the single best anti aging topical available, get new types of skin damage, then try to turn back the clock. Because generally speaking, turning back the clock never works that well. Then you'll be bac here asking for advice. Commence obsession.

 

Any time the sun is up, UVA light is coming through.

Two types of uv rays. Uvb (the ones that burn and cause skin cancers, but do not have much to do with skin aging), and UVA rays, which are around year round, regardless of season at roughly the same strength. Yes even on cloudy days. They also penetrate glass (unlike uvb rays), and make up 75% of visible light from the sun. They are responsible for 805 of the extrinsic skin aging we see over a lifetime, and even contrbute to the shrinking of subcutaneous fat due to said radiation.

 

Personally I would skip the pure hyaluronic acid and shoot just for MSM powder (of any brand). MSM converts to hyaluronic acid in the body and also helps collagen production. two birds one stone.

 

If you are having dynamic wrinkles due to actual facial muscle usage I reccomend supplementing magnesium. elped my constanty tensed brow a lot

 

At any rate, for anti aging, follow at least some form of intermittent fasting (18 hour window minimum), daily sunscreen EVERY day, low stress, dermaroll once every  weeks for extra collagen induction, Sunscreen and some form of fasting (to induce higher NAD levels as well as keeping blood glucose more level to discourage glycation, while inhibiting mTOR somewhat), is all a great, simple, liveabl strategy. Good luck....

 

the moment they come out with a pill that increases NAD while inhibiting cd38, I will drop fasting forever. But till then ...


  • Ill informed x 1





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: aging, collagen, wrinkles, fine lines, reversing, damage, maintenance

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users