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Intermittent fasting -> hypoglycemia -> neurological damage?

glutamate storm neurotoxicity intermittent fasting ie

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#1 Marbles

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 10:13 AM


Could intermittent fasting result in excitotoxicity?

I recently learned that hypoglycemia can cause glutamate surges and excitotoxicity. Is this something one should worry about during intermittent fasting?

I suffered some neurological damage some years ago, resulting in mild peripheral neuropathy and a lot of serious cognitive symptoms. The doctors cannot explain why, but I was practicing IF at the time. Could that be the cause? I do not have diabetes.

Information here might be useful:
https://en.wikipedia.../Excitotoxicity


Edited by Marbles, 16 April 2021 - 10:14 AM.


#2 Mind

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 10:25 AM

It would seem odd that IF would cause long-term neurological issues, since short-term effects are very positive for health (according to a robust and growing literature surrounding the subject). Perhaps it is a more complicated metabolic situation than just glutamate surges. 


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#3 Marbles

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 10:49 AM

It would seem odd that IF would cause long-term neurological issues, since short-term effects are very positive for health (according to a robust and growing literature surrounding the subject). Perhaps it is a more complicated metabolic situation than just glutamate surges. 

Yeah, the numerous purported health benefits were the reason why I started fasting. But I wonder whether there could be physiological dangers in certain areas of the body, especially in sensitive individuals (individuals high in glutamate production and/or sensitivity). I've always been easily sensorily overstimulated, and had a racing mind.

Usually I feel okay when fasting. I don't really mind hunger, and my brain feels fine if a little sluggish. Some days are harder.

I bought some strips to test blood sugar levels, but discovered I need more equipment to utilize them. I will probably buy the equipment, and if so I will do daily measurements for at least a week, and post the results here. Perhaps there is some interest.

Thanks for your reply. 



#4 pamojja

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 12:33 PM

.. and if so I will do daily measurements for at least a week, and post the results here.

 

That*s the first step to find out if something is actually going on. Personally keep prediabetes in check since a few years. Main strategy is to test fasting and each postprandial blood glucose for reducing or eliminating most offending foods. Also don't eat for a 16-18 hours each day.

 

Practically I've never turned out hypoglycemic. Not even during a 1 week fast (due to neoglucogenesis).  Average fasting was 105 mg/dl, average postpranidal 134 mg/dl during the last 10 years. Lowest ever measured fasting glucose was about 90 - very, very far from hypoglycemia.
 


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#5 Marbles

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 02:07 PM

That*s the first step to find out if something is actually going on. Personally keep prediabetes in check since a few years. Main strategy is to test fasting and each postprandial blood glucose for reducing or eliminating most offending foods. Also don't eat for a 16-18 hours each day.

 

Practically I've never turned out hypoglycemic. Not even during a 1 week fast (due to neoglucogenesis).  Average fasting was 105 mg/dl, average postpranidal 134 mg/dl during the last 10 years. Lowest ever measured fasting glucose was about 90 - very, very far from hypoglycemia.
 

That is encouraging. It's always sounded strange to me when people talk about having low blood sugar when grumpy from hunger; that it would be as volatile as that.

I didn't think to test post meal. That is a good idea. I haven't worried about diabetes, but when you can perform a thorough test like that in a way a doctor wouldn't be able to, why not do it? 

I'll pick up the rest of the gear and post some measurements when I've made them. Knowing myself, though, it migt take a little time before I get about to it.

Thanks for your reply.



#6 OlderThanThou2

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Posted 18 April 2021 - 06:24 AM

What about blood flow to the brain on IF? If it decreases too much it might not be good. Also micronutrients tend to have absorption limits, so it might be better to take them in several servings throughout the day. Perhaps it'd be better to eat vegetables and get phytonutrients outside of the feeding period, especially those that increase blood flow in the brain. 



#7 Marbles

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Posted 18 April 2021 - 08:37 AM

What about blood flow to the brain on IF? If it decreases too much it might not be good. Also micronutrients tend to have absorption limits, so it might be better to take them in several servings throughout the day. Perhaps it'd be better to eat vegetables and get phytonutrients outside of the feeding period, especially those that increase blood flow in the brain. 

The research strongly indicates that fasting is healthy for most people, in most ways. I believe that includes cognitively. Maybe some people are particularly vulnerable to some stress fasting puts on a body, though?






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