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Ketamine. Normalises my HPA axis dysfunction, orthostatic/exercise intolerance and reactions to foods - why???

neuroscience psychopharmacology ketamine nmda antagonist stress response cfs autonomic dysfunction sympathetic nervous system brain fog hpa dysfunction

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#1 YimYam

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 09:24 AM


(Peeps who have a solid understanding of neuroscience, psychopharmacology etc... I'd greatly appreciate your input.)

 

 

 

For the past 9 years or so I've been experiencing CFS with autonomic dysfunction related issues.

 

I've been living with my nervous system stuck in sympathetic overload. I have an extremely hyperactive nervous system that pretty much activates to anything and everything.

 

Severe unrelenting brain fog, exercise intolerance and reactions to foods. In short, whether its lifting weights, walking up a hill, doing yoga, drinking caffeine, eating certain foods, my sympathetic nervous system goes into major overdrive, so for reasons I can't fully comprehend these activities trigger a chronic stress response which worsens my already severe cognitive issues and fight/flight. It's like stabbing a nail into a high pressure gas pipe, there's a burst of shitty chemicals, adrenaline etc which is overwhelming to say the least.

 

As you'd expect, this nonsense has had a catastrophic impact on my social/work life. 

 

Ketamine basically puts my body back in kilter, it makes me almost normal again. My nervous system responds normally to things as long as I've had a moderate dose of ketamine. I can function signficantly better, socialise with greater ease, eat the foods that I'd normally react to with a chronic stress response, I can exercise and feel my body reacting liking any normal body would when doing exercise. I feel energised and able to function rather than fatigued, chronically overstimulated and weak. 

 

 

Apart from memantine, what are some strong NMDA antagonists I could try?  Do you have any understanding of what might be going on here? If you have any advice or recommendations on how I can move forward, it'd be greatly appreciated! 

 

 

 

I'm going to see if I can somehow get my hands on some Esketamine in the forseeable future.

 


Edited by YimYam, 03 May 2021 - 09:28 AM.


#2 Hip

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 10:28 PM

High-dose transdermal magnesium inhibits NMDA. Here is how to apply it. Oral magnesium cannot be administered in high doses due to bowel flushing. 

 

Wikipedia has a good list of NMDA receptor antagonists.

 

You may also find that supplements which reduce brain inflammation help, as neuroinflammation is known to pump out lots of glutamate which activates the NMDA receptor. So by reducing the root cause of NMDA activation you may get better results. I have some anecdotal evidence that N-acetyl glucosamine at dose of 1000 to 2000 mg daily may reduce brain inflammation and glutamate release.

 

 

However, it may be other effects of ketamine which are providing benefit:

 

This study says ketamine induces mTOR activation.

 

And new research shows it may not be the NMDA inhibition of ketamine which underlies its antidepressant effect, but one of ketamine's metabolites called HNK (hydroxynorketamine).


Edited by Hip, 03 May 2021 - 10:31 PM.

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#3 YimYam

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 09:25 PM

High-dose transdermal magnesium inhibits NMDA. Here is how to apply it. Oral magnesium cannot be administered in high doses due to bowel flushing. 

 

Wikipedia has a good list of NMDA receptor antagonists.

 

You may also find that supplements which reduce brain inflammation help, as neuroinflammation is known to pump out lots of glutamate which activates the NMDA receptor. So by reducing the root cause of NMDA activation you may get better results. I have some anecdotal evidence that N-acetyl glucosamine at dose of 1000 to 2000 mg daily may reduce brain inflammation and glutamate release.

 

 

However, it may be other effects of ketamine which are providing benefit:

 

This study says ketamine induces mTOR activation.

 

And new research shows it may not be the NMDA inhibition of ketamine which underlies its antidepressant effect, but one of ketamine's metabolites called HNK (hydroxynorketamine).

 

Many thanks for this, Hip. I've bought the epsom salts and spray bottle. What's the maximum dose I can use if each spray is around 75mg? 

 

Is mTOR activation good for autoimmune conditions?



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#4 Hip

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 10:44 PM

Many thanks for this, Hip. I've bought the epsom salts and spray bottle. What's the maximum dose I can use if each spray is around 75mg? 

 

Is mTOR activation good for autoimmune conditions?

 

What you find is that if you use a saturated solution of Epsom salts and rub onto your skin from head to toe, 10 or 20 minutes later as it fully dries into a powdery deposit on your skin, some will fall off as a white dust. So that limits you dose. I have applied Epsom salts in this way three times daily for extended periods. If using doses this high though, it is advisable to take some oral calcium supplement.

 

 

 There was a lot of discussion about mTOR on the Phoenix Rising ME/CFS forum a few years back, but I forget the details. I just mention mTOR to show that ketamine does have other mechanisms of action in addition to its NMDA effects.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: neuroscience, psychopharmacology, ketamine, nmda antagonist, stress response, cfs, autonomic dysfunction, sympathetic nervous system, brain fog, hpa dysfunction

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