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Telomeres' role in skin integrity?

wrinkles ages glycation telomeres

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8 replies to this topic

#1 RubiksKid

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Posted 02 January 2022 - 02:16 PM


I'm a little confused. I read about a telomerase activating compound that reduced wrinkles after being applied topically. How does elongating telomeres accomplish this? I thought wrinkles were a result of glycation and the breakdown of structural proteins from normal wear and tear. 


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#2 QuestforLife

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Posted 11 January 2022 - 11:39 AM

Why make any assumptions about why skin ages? 

 

Perhaps longer telomeres would enable faster turn over of skin layers. 


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#3 RubiksKid

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Posted 17 January 2022 - 11:19 AM

Why make any assumptions about why skin ages? 

 

Perhaps longer telomeres would enable faster turn over of skin layers. 

 

I'm not trying to make assumptions. I just think that it would be useful to understand the mechanisms at play.


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#4 QuestforLife

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Posted 17 January 2022 - 12:30 PM

I just think that it would be useful to understand the mechanisms at play.

 

A simple thought experiment suffices to show AGEs are not of primary importance in skin aging.  Almost any 50yo person with black skin looks younger than a person with white skin who is about 35 or over. If AGEs were primary this would not be the case. Clearly with more melanin, the contribution to skin aging from the sun is reduced for those with darker skin.

 

This suggests to me that cellular senescence, either from direct damage like from UV, or indirectly from greater cellular replacement and therefore telomere attrition, is important in skin aging.


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#5 RubiksKid

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Posted 18 January 2022 - 06:47 AM

A simple thought experiment suffices to show AGEs are not of primary importance in skin aging.  Almost any 50yo person with black skin looks younger than a person with white skin who is about 35 or over. If AGEs were primary this would not be the case. Clearly with more melanin, the contribution to skin aging from the sun is reduced for those with darker skin.

 

This suggests to me that cellular senescence, either from direct damage like from UV, or indirectly from greater cellular replacement and therefore telomere attrition, is important in skin aging.

 

So you're saying that skin cells proliferate faster due to UV damage? I didn't know that, but I guess it's not surprising. And I agree with your first premise. I've thought the same thing as well.


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#6 QuestforLife

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Posted 18 January 2022 - 11:59 AM

So you're saying that skin cells proliferate faster due to UV damage? I didn't know that, but I guess it's not surprising. And I agree with your first premise. I've thought the same thing as well.

 

Well it is probably a bit more complicated than that, but essentially yes.

 

UV will cause cellular senescence; such cells will require replacement. So that is the greater turnover. But at some stage turnover slows. That might be a telomere issue, or there might be something else going on in the stem cell niche. Either way UV clearly is a great skin aging accelerator, and things like retinol that increase turnover in the skin seem to improve matters (though in theory they might be causing greater telomere loss).  


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#7 Learner056

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Posted 02 September 2022 - 11:07 PM

Beautiful thread, both the question as well QuestforLife (your responses in various threads are enlightening):  I am ignorant of biology, I wish if there was some kind of process diagram (conceptual/logical flows) that lay down the: a) skin anatomical framework, b) overlay with cell-cycle framework (skin specific) b) possible factors - external vs internal biological, c) the flow indicative of a rough weightage approximation of how each factor is contributive to the total sum precisely by using the logic you discuss here. 

 

Rubikskido is right, most associate glycation as the most significant factor, simply because it is the most presented as such.  By chance if any such framework already exists, would love to read it, and if not, Rubikskid I hope you can create one using this very thread. 

 

Well it is probably a bit more complicated than that, but essentially yes.

 

UV will cause cellular senescence; such cells will require replacement. So that is the greater turnover. But at some stage turnover slows. That might be a telomere issue, or there might be something else going on in the stem cell niche. Either way UV clearly is a great skin aging accelerator, and things like retinol that increase turnover in the skin seem to improve matters (though in theory they might be causing greater telomere loss).  

 


Edited by Learner056, 02 September 2022 - 11:15 PM.


#8 Qowpel

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Posted 10 September 2022 - 12:24 AM

I'm not trying to make assumptions. I just think that it would be useful to understand the mechanisms at play.

youre worried about fine wrinkling when the REAL reason people look much older over time is the lengthening of the philtrum, loss of subcutnaeous fat, sagging of the brow and eyelids, sagging of the mid face, dropping of the nose tip with aging, etc. These are all WAY bigger players than crows feet


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#9 Learner056

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Posted 14 September 2022 - 03:19 AM

Very informative, people hear about wrinkling too often, but not some of these causes you listed.  Would you know by chance a good write up (i.e. not those typical doctor centric - dumb too high level writeups of all the boring plastic surgeries and stuff, but instead molecular cell level insights) on all these?  Let's fix it all through protocols, you all young people. 

 

youre worried about fine wrinkling when the REAL reason people look much older over time is the lengthening of the philtrum, loss of subcutnaeous fat, sagging of the brow and eyelids, sagging of the mid face, dropping of the nose tip with aging, etc. These are all WAY bigger players than crows feet

 


Edited by Learner056, 14 September 2022 - 03:38 AM.






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