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Human Cloning and the Total Body Transplant


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#1 Bruce Klein

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 07:11 AM


Marcel has allowed us the opportunity to post his essay for the benefit of ImmInst members. ~ Bruce Klein




Human Cloning and the Total Body Transplant
Biological Immortality in the 21st Century?


Posted Image
by Marcel Kuijsten

You see things; and you say “Why?” But I dream things that never were;
and I say “Why not?” — George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)


The primary goals of medicine have always been to reduce human suffering and prolong life. In the last 100 years, modern medicine has made great strides in the control of many infectious diseases, and the increase in life expectancy in the United States can be attributedalmost entirely to this fact. At the turn of the century, the average life expectancy in the United States was forty-nine. Now it is around seventy-six, a 55 percent increase in a century. If this trend continues, the average life expectancy of human beings should reach 100 years some timein the 21st century.1 However, many emerging biomedical technologies have the potential todrastically increase the human life span in the 21st century far beyond 100 years. One of these technologies is human cloning, in conjunction with the total body transplant. Cloning often evokes fearful images from Aldous Huxley’s book Brave New World, but actually, cloning is found everywhere. In gardening, the use of cuttings to create genetically identical copies of plants is common and dates back several thousand years.2 In the grocery store,many fruits and vegetables are clones of specially bred plants. Although plants are easily cloned, until recently scientists were unable to clone mammals. The announcement on February 23, 1997, in The Observer, that Ian Wilmut, a Scottish scientist, and his colleagues at the Roslin Institute had successfully cloned a sheep sparked a worldwide debate on the potential benefits and ethical concerns of cloning animals and possiblyeven human beings.

Continued: PDF Version - HTML Version

#2 bitster

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 10:18 PM

perfect

#3 eres

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 09:07 PM

I've had this discussion with people before. ( trying to spread the word ya'know). We can clone and stem cells can almost repair nervous system damage. So very soon we should be able to move our brains into a pregrown clones of ourselves(grown without a brain). Total Body Transplant. So in this fashion, we could go on as long as we prevent damage to our brains. Or at least this could give us more time in case better options do not arrive soon enough. It might be prudent to encase the brain in a completely indestructable artificial skull at some point so that it isn't handled every time we have a transplant and just for the hazards of life.

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#4 openly68atheist

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 05:11 PM

It's more comonly refered to as a Whole Body Transplant, that seems to be the "standard" if you compare how many hits each term gets when you google them.

WholeBT gets 929

FullBT gets 366

CompleteBT gets 215

TotalBT gets 191

Also wikipedia uses it a WholeBT instead of a TotalBT, and it seems from the google results that second to WholeBT the most commonly used words to refer to this procedure is FullBT.

#5 rodentman

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 04:56 AM

The links seem to be dead.

By the way, I did a web search about 6 years ago (back in the alta vista days) for body transplant and cloning, and it there wasnt a single site addressing it. Now the idea seems more out in the open.

Now, if we could only clone a primate. sighhhhh.

#6 boundlesslife

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Posted 19 November 2005 - 09:45 AM

Human Cloning and the Total Body Transplant
Biological Immortality in the 21st Century?


Continued: PDF VersionHTML Version

As others have mentioned, it would be great if a new link could be found to this article! And, as eres has added, above:

I've had this discussion with people before. ( trying to spread the word ya'know). We can clone and stem cells can almost repair nervous system damage. So very soon we should be able to move our brains into a pregrown clones of ourselves(grown without a brain). Total Body Transplant. So in this fashion, we could go on as long as we prevent damage to our brains. Or at least this could give us more time in case better options do not arrive soon enough. It might be prudent to encase the brain in a completely indestructable artificial skull at some point so that it isn't handled every time we have a transplant and just for the hazards of life.

That's a great way of condensing a lot of good ideas into a short synopsis! In another recent posting, I'd mentioned a story about uploading people into "Identity Modules" (IM's) that were efficient, highly "compressed" (like what you can do with .jpg files) mirror images of actual neurological systems. It's on-line, and here I'll only copy a few of the beginning paragraphs, with a link to the full story, for any who might want to read it:

Arnold Devore smiled, his eyes still closed. Suddenly it didn't seem to hurt anymore. His throat had been burning with each gasp of terminal pneumonia. Now he could breathe easily. The air seemed filled with the scent of flowers, and he felt an urge to stretch. Closing his fingers tightly, he sensed the rippling of great muscles in his arms. Was it a dream?

Gripped by an incredible notion, Arnold threw his body upward and forced his eyes open. Moments before he could barely have rolled over in bed; now he flew instantly to a sitting position and found two people in the hospital room, a large man with a powerful chin and a slender young woman whose hair fell softly to her shoulders. Both were smiling. Their faces seemed vaguely familiar. Then he knew who they were, Judy and Sam.

"Damn!" said Arnold, grinning as he sorted out what had taken place. It was as if he were witness to a transformation where two old people, shrunken and shriveled a moment ago, were flung forward in time, into youthful states.

Sam had been a gaunt, hairless ghost, smiling as he fought the final stages of an illness which ended many years of futile suffering. Seven years later Judy, a white haired, diminutive old lady, whispered, "Arnold, you've held on through more than anyone could have asked. Now, my love, it will be over before you know it. I'll be close behind, and I'll see you soon!"

The last thing Arnold recalled, other than struggling for air, fluids strangling his lungs and throat, was the pressure of Judy's hand holding his; then he fell away into blackness. Awake again, this time, he sensed the agony was over for good.

"Welcome back!" cried Judy, tears forming in her eyes. She hesitantly approached the bed, then she hurled herself into his arms. Arnold ran his fingers over her trim body, feeling the wiry strength beneath her female softness. "Don't hold me so tight," Judy giggled, "you're stronger than you think!" They tumbled laughing to the carpeted floor, rolling over and over.

After a few moments, Arnold gently held Judy away from him, drinking her in with his eyes. She was dressed in something like a dress suit with no looseness of material, almost indecently draped and molded to her form. Then he noticed Sam was wearing a tight fitting male garment and was pointing to one for him, hung over what surely must be a chair. Arnold felt himself flush, as he suddenly glanced down and realized he was nude.

"Don't you at least put your patients in pajamas?" he mumbled, slipping into the snug apparel.

"That went out a long time ago," Sam chuckled. "Others like you and I convinced the world it was useless. Oh, for a while we put gowns on people waking up from deep sleep, but they just tore them off to see what their bodies looked like."

Judy smiled. "We have so many ways of looking good there's little reason to conceal anything. Clothes are more an art than a necessity, now. In other ways, you'll see, appearance is less important than ever before."

"Judy's getting ahead of things," Sam interrupted, a trifle nervously. "Why don't you finish zipping that sheath and we'll show you the town."


Sam has a right to be a "trifle nervous", as you'll see if you want to follow this link!

#7 jnnywllms

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 09:59 AM

Cloning could be used to produce new organs for organ transplants a total ban of therapeutic cloning in its global convention on human cloning. To think in terms of an operation for human brain transplantation anatomically the procedure should be considered a total 'body transplant.Total human transformation is exemplified by reproductive medicine and human that brain transplants ie, body transplants, cryonics, human cloning.The Immortality Institute is a nonprofit organization with the mission to conquer the blight of involuntary death.
------------------------------
jnnywllms

(edited by Matthias: spam link removed)

Edited by Matthias, 25 September 2008 - 02:14 PM.


#8 Luna

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 12:07 PM

Talking about resurrection of threads! ;)
Where are our cloned body organs by now anyways?

#9 seivtcho

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 06:57 AM

Our cloned organs still can not be created.

So far the generation of tissues and organs from stem cells is limited to such, that either are not this important for the survival of the human, or already have an effective artifitial transplant, or mean much for the treatment of some diseases, but not for the treatment of the age related diseases. These are skin, blood cells, artifitial bone and cartilages, artifitial ear, heart valve, etc.

The modeling of transplantable large organs from clonned stem cells, such as liver, lungs, heart, kidneys require 3d printing technologies, that do not exist and perhaps will not exist in the near future.

Once vitally important, suitable for transplantation organs are successfully produced from clonned stem cells they will be extremely expensive and will be this expensive for decades.

Perhaps a newborn child today will be long death when the cloning of organs becomes an usual procedure.

#10 amarjeet singh

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 10:23 AM

suppose u have an old laptop now u want a new but very important files in the old one what will you do. i think the simplest way is to put the hard disk of old one into new one. same with humans. human body is like laptop and brain is like hardisk. if surgeons can able to transplant the brain into a new body the person get a new life. this is the simplest way to become immortal. but there is a problem with this. laptop has its hard disk and procesor diff but not humans brain is aur processor and hardisk . let us suppose laptop has his procesor and hard disk together like humans. then the old laptop has slow processor like functioning of human brain get slow withe age.so what can we do with the laptops. we will send the data from old hardisk to new one then new laptop will have all your fills with new procesor. same with humans if scientist are able to read and transfer data from brain we can became immortal . there is another problem from where do we get the new body and how want to become immortal if we change his identity. the answer is cloning. suppose we are 40 year old. we make aur clone .when we become 60 aur clone become 20 then we trans plant aur brain so theoretically we become young from 60 to 20.
there is another problem human brain has limited memory after 150 years the memory become full and we are unable to remember any thing .if scientist can increase the memory of brain the problem is solved.
if scientist can do these three things
1 read and transfer data from brain.
2 increase the memory of brain we can become immortal.




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