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Tretinoin; Retin-A


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#1 Eva Victoria

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 07:18 PM


The closest one can get to a miracle. It is used to treat acne vulgaris and wrinkles, mottled pigmentation caused by UV damage.
UVA-rays damage existing collagen fibres and inhibit the formation of new ones. Hence depriving us from our youth.
Why tretinoin is considered to come as close to a miracle as possible is because it allows your body to produce new collagen hence to be able to replace the UV-damaged collagen fibres.

It turns sun damaged skin back to more normal skin. The Epidermis is thinner with smaller pores, less lines and generally has more refined surface.

The Dermis: the supporting part of the skin is thicker, fuller. Collagen fibres are in production, replacing old, used ones.

Tretinoin is not a preventive drug for sun damage, but it is definitely something to think about when the damage is done.
I would recommend to use it every night from late 20s with a high SPF (full UVA protection).

Although the exact mode of action of tretinoin is unknown, current evidence suggests that topical tretinoin decreases cohesiveness of follicular epithelial cells with decreased microcomedo formation. Additionally, tretinoin stimulates mitotic activity and increased turnover of follicular epithelial cells causing extrusion of the comedones.
Retin-A is indicated for topical application in the treatment of acne vulgaris or solarelastosis. The safety and efficacy of the long-term use of this product in the treatment of other disorders have not been established.
Exposure to sunlight, including sunlamps, should be minimized during the use of Retin-A, and patients with sunburn should be advised not to use the product until fully recovered because of heightened susceptibility to sunlight as a result of the use of tretinoin. Patients who may be required to have considerable sun exposure due to occupation and those with inherent sensitivity to the sun should exercise particular caution. Use of sunscreen products and protective clothing over treated areas is recommended when exposure cannot be avoided. Weather extremes, such as wind or cold, also may be irritating to patients under treatment with tretinoin.
Retin-A (tretinoin) should be kept away from the eyes, the mouth, angles of the nose, and mucous membranes. Topical use may induce severe local erythema and peeling at the site of application. If the degree of local irritation warrants, patients should be directed to use the medication less frequently, discontinue use temporarily, or discontinue use altogether. Tretinoin has been reported to cause severe irritation on eczematous skin and should be used with utmost caution in patients with this condition.
Drug Interactions: Concomitant topical medication, medicated or abrasive soaps and cleansers, soaps and cosmetics that have a strong drying effect, and products with high concentrations of alcohol, astringents, spices or lime should be used with caution because of possible interaction with tretinoin. Particular caution should be exercised in using preparations containing sulfur, resorcinol, or salicylic acid with Retin-A. It also is advisable to "rest" a patient's skin until the effects of such preparations subside before use of Retin-A is begun.
Carcinogenesis: Long-term animal studies to determine the carcinogenic potential of tretinoin have not been performed. Studies in hairless albino mice suggest that tretinoin may accelerate the tumorigenic potential of weakly carcinogenic light from a solar simulator. In other studies, when lightly pigmented hairless mice treated with tretinoin were exposed to carcinogenic doses of UVB light, the incidence and rate of development of skin tumors was reduced. Due to significantly different experimental conditions, no strict comparison of these disparate data is possible. Although the significance of these studies to man is not clear, patients should avoid or minimize exposure to sun.
Topical tretinoin has not been shown to be teratogenic in rats and rabbits when given in doses of 100 and 320 times the topical human dose, respectively (assuming a 50 kg adult applies 250 mg of 0.1% cream topically). However, at these topical doses, delayed ossification of a number of bones occurred in both species. These changes may be considered variants of normal development and are usually corrected after weaning. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Tretinoin should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.
The skin of certain sensitive individuals may become excessively red, edematous, blistered, or crusted. If these effects occur, the medication should either be discontinued until the integrity of the skin is restored, or the medication should be adjusted to a level the patient can tolerate. True contact allergy to topical tretinoin is rarely encountered. Temporary hyper or hypopigmentation has been reported with repeated application of Retin-A. Some individuals have been reported to have heightened susceptibility to sunlight while under treatment with Retin-A. To date, all adverse effects of Retin-A have been reversible upon discontinuance of therapy .
If medication is applied excessively, no more rapid or better results will be obtained and marked redness, peeling, or discomfort may occur. Oral ingestion of the drug may lead to the same side effects as those associated with excessive oral intake of Vitamin A.
Retin-A Gel, Cream or Liquid should be applied once a day, before retiring, to the skin where acne lesions appear, using enough to cover the entire affected area lightly. Liquid: The liquid may be applied using a fingertip, gauze pad, or cotton swab. If gauze or cotton is employed, care should be taken not to oversaturate it to the extent that the liquid would run into areas where treatment is not intended. Gel: Excessive application results in "pilling" of the gel, which minimizes the likelihood of over application by the patient.
Application may cause a transitory feeling of warmth or slight stinging. In cases where it has been necessary to temporarily discontinue therapy or to reduce the frequency of application, therapy may be resumed or frequency of application increased when the patients become able to tolerate the treatment.
Alterations of vehicle, drug concentration, or dose frequency should be closely monitored by careful observation of the clinical therapeutic response and skin tolerance.
During the early weeks of therapy, an apparent exacerbation of inflammatory lesions may occur. This is due to the action of the medication on deep, previously unseen lesions and should not be considered a reason to discontinue therapy.
Therapeutic results should be noticed after two to three weeks but more than six weeks of therapy may be required before definite beneficial effects are seen.
Once the acne lesions have responded satisfactorily, it may be possible to maintain the improvement with less frequent applications, or other dosage forms.
Patients treated with Retin-A (tretinoin) acne treatment may use cosmetics, but the area to be treated should be cleansed thoroughly before the medication is applied.
The effects of the sun on your skin. As you know, overexposure to natural sunlight or the artificial sunlight of a sunlamp can cause sunburn. Overexposure to the sun over many years may cause premature aging of the skin and even skin cancer. The chance of these effects occurring will vary depending on skin type, the climate and the care taken to avoid overexposure to the sun. Therapy with Retin-A may make your skin more susceptible to sunburn and other adverse effects of the sun, so unprotected exposure to natural or artificial sunlight should be minimized.

Laboratory findings.When laboratory mice are exposed to artificial sunlight, they often develop skin tumors. These sunlight-induced tumors may appear more quickly and in greater number if the mouse is also topically treated with the active ingredient in Retin-A, tretinoin. In some studies, under different conditions, however, when mice treated with tretinoin were exposed to artificial sunlight, the incidence and rate of development of skin tumors was reduced. There is no evidence to date that tretinoin alone will cause the development of skin tumors in either laboratory animals or humans. However, investigations in this area are continuing.

Use caution in the sun. When outside, even on hazy days, areas treated with Retin-A should be protected. An effective sunscreen should be used any time you are outside. For extended sun exposure, protective clothing, like a hat, should be worn. Do not use artificial sunlamps while you are using Retin-A. If you do become sunburned, stop your therapy with Retin-A until your skin has recovered.
Avoid excessive exposure to wind or cold. Extremes of climate tend to dry or burn normal skin. Skin treated with Retin-A may be more vulnerable to these extremes. Your physician can recommend ways to manage your acne treatment under such conditions.
Possible problems. The skin of certain sensitive individuals may become excessively red, swollen, blistered or crusted. If you are experiencing severe or persistent irritation, discontinue the use of Retin-A and consult your physician.
There have been reports that, in some patients, areas treated with Retin-A developed a temporary increase or decrease in the amount of skin pigment (color) present. The pigment in these areas returned to normal either when the skin was allowed to adjust to Retin-A or therapy was discontinued.
Use other medication only on your physician's advice. Only your physician knows which other medications may be helpful during treatment and will recommend them to you if necessary. Follow the physician's instructions carefully. In addition, you should avoid preparations that may dry or irritate your skin. These preparations may include certain astringents, toiletries containing alcohol, spices or lime, or certain medicated soaps, shampoos and hair permanent solutions. Do not allow anyone else to use this medication.
Do not use other medications with Retin-A which are not recommended by your doctor. The medications you have used in the past might cause unnecessary redness or peeling.

AND WHILE YOU'RE ON Retin-A THERAPY

Use a mild, non-medicated soap. Avoid frequent washings and harsh scrubbing. Acne isn't caused by dirt, so no matter how hard you scrub, you can't wash it away. Washing too frequently or scrubbing too roughly may at times actually make your acne worse. Wash your skin gently with a mild, bland soap. Two or three times a day should be sufficient. Pat skin dry with a towel. Let the face dry 20 to 30 minutes before applying Retin-A. Remember, excessive irritation such as rubbing, too much washing, use of other medications not suggested by your physician, etc., may worsen your acne.
HOW TO USE Retin-A (TRETINOIN)
To get the best results with Retin-A therapy, it is necessary to use it properly. Forget about the instructions given for other products and the advice of friends. Just stick to the special plan your doctor has laid out for you and be patient. Remember, when Retin-A is used properly, many users see improvement by 12 weeks. AGAIN, FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS – BE PATIENT – DON'T START AND STOP THERAPY ON YOUR OWN – IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS, ASK YOUR DOCTOR.
Apply Retin-A once daily before bedtime, or as directed by your physician. Your physician may advise, especially if your skin is sensitive, that you start your therapy by applying Retin-A every other night. First, wash with a mild soap and dry your skin gently.WAIT 20 to 30 MINUTES BEFORE APPLYING MEDICATION; it is important for skin to be completely dry in order to minimize possible irritation.
  • It is better not to use more than the amount suggested by your physician or to apply more frequently than instructed.Too much may irritate the skin, waste medication and won't give faster or better results.
  • Keep the medication away from the corners of the nose, mouth, eyes and open wounds. Spread away from these areas when applying.
  • Cream: Squeeze about a half inch or less of medication onto the fingertip. While that should be enough for your whole face, after you have some experience with the medication you may find you need slightly more or less to do the job. The medication should become invisible almost immediately. If it is still visible, you are using too much. Cover the affected area lightly with Retin-A (tretinoin) Cream by first dabbing it on your forehead, chin and both cheeks, then spreading it over the entire affected area. Smooth gently into the skin.
  • Gel: Squeeze about a half inch or less of medication onto the fingertip. While that should be enough for your whole face, after you have some experience with the medication you may find you need slightly more or less to do the job. The medication should become invisible almost immediately. If it is still visible, or if dry flaking occurs from the gel within a minute or so, you are using too much. Cover the affected area lightly with Retin-A (tretinoin) Gel by first dabbing it on your forehead, chin and both cheeks, then spreading it over the entire affected area. Smooth gently into the skin.
  • Liquid: Retin-A (tretinoin) Liquid may be applied to the skin where acne lesions appear, spreading the medication over the entire affected area, using a fingertip, gauze pad, or cotton swab. If gauze or cotton is employed, care should be taken not to oversaturate it to the extent that the liquid would run into areas where treatment is not intended (such as corners of the mouth, eyes, and nose).
  • It is recommended that you apply a moisturizer or a moisturizer with sunscreen that will not aggravate your acne (noncomedogenic) every morning after you wash.
WHAT TO EXPECT WITH YOUR NEW TREATMENT
Retin-A works deep inside your skin and this takes time. You cannot make Retin-A work any faster by applying more than one dose each day, but an excess amount of Retin-A may irritate your skin. Be patient.
There may be some discomfort or peeling during the early days of treatment. Some patients also notice that their skin begins to take on a blush.
These reactions do not happen to everyone. If they do, it is just your skin adjusting to Retin-A and this usually subsides within two to four weeks. These reactions can usually be minimized by following instructions carefully. Should the effects become excessively troublesome, consult your doctor.

BY THREE TO SIX WEEKS, some patients notice an appearance of new blemishes (papules and pustules). At this stage it is important to continue using Retin-A.

If Retin-A is going to have a beneficial effect for you, you should notice a continued improvement in your appearance after 6 to 12 weeks of therapy. Don't be discouraged if you see no immediate improvement. Don't stop treatment at the first signs of improvement.

Retin-A (Tretinoin)
INGREDIENTS
Tretinoin (Tretinoin)
Active 0.025%; 0,05%; 0,1%
stearic acid
isopropyl myristate
polyoxyl 40 stearate
stearyl alcohol
xanthan gum
sorbic acid
butylated hydroxytoluene

water

Attached Files


Edited by niner, 13 February 2008 - 06:27 AM.


#2 donjoe

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 09:57 PM

Hehe, those would be great pictures if the hair color didn't change between them as well (which I'm sure has nothing to do with tretinoin). :~

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#3 lucid

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 03:30 AM

I got some in Mexico since I didn't need a prescription there. Its money, just wish that I had gotten more.

#4 Eva Victoria

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 04:56 PM

I got some in Mexico since I didn't need a prescription there. Its money, just wish that I had gotten more.


You should always have an advise of a dermatologist!!!

#5 donjoe

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 06:00 PM

You should always have an advise of a dermatologist!!!

Well, it's not like he suddenly decided to take isotretinoin, he shouldn't be in mortal danger from just topical tretinoin. :) And unless he has eczemas or who knows what extreme irritations, he shouldn't be in any kind of danger whatsoever. Myself, I got mine just with money too (no prescription required (yet?) in Romania; or maybe I just got lucky - after all, the pharmacist hadn't even heard of tretinoin, she had to do a search on the computer when I asked :~).

#6 Eva Victoria

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 06:29 PM

You should always have an advise of a dermatologist!!!

Well, it's not like he suddenly decided to take isotretinoin, he shouldn't be in mortal danger from just topical tretinoin. :) And unless he has eczemas or who knows what extreme irritations, he shouldn't be in any kind of danger whatsoever. Myself, I got mine just with money too (no prescription required (yet?) in Romania; or maybe I just got lucky - after all, the pharmacist hadn't even heard of tretinoin, she had to do a search on the computer when I asked :~ ).


There are more side effects than causing redness and irritation. I still believe the advise of a doctor is needed. Not for fun that it is an Rx drug :)

#7 donjoe

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 08:49 PM

There are more side effects than causing redness and irritation. I still believe the advise of a doctor is needed. Not for fun that it is an Rx drug :~

Well, I expect all significant side-effects to be mentioned in the leaflet and I haven't seen anything unmanageable in there (having read several Romanian and English versions of it). Apart from transitory irritation/dryness and increased photosensitivity (which can be solved with proper sunscreening), what else could it cause?

#8 niner

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 09:09 PM

There are more side effects than causing redness and irritation. I still believe the advise of a doctor is needed. Not for fun that it is an Rx drug :~

Well, I expect all significant side-effects to be mentioned in the leaflet and I haven't seen anything unmanageable in there (having read several Romanian and English versions of it). Apart from transitory irritation/dryness and increased photosensitivity (which can be solved with proper sunscreening), what else could it cause?

It could cause permanent eczema that never goes away... even where there was not pre-existing eczema. It's a pretty serious drug.

#9 donjoe

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 09:49 PM

It could cause permanent eczema that never goes away... even where there was not pre-existing eczema. It's a pretty serious drug.

I haven't seen such a serious warning anywhere. Can you provide a reference for your assertion?

#10 niner

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 04:37 AM

It could cause permanent eczema that never goes away... even where there was not pre-existing eczema. It's a pretty serious drug.

I haven't seen such a serious warning anywhere. Can you provide a reference for your assertion?

I used a little bit of 0.025% on the backs of my hands (thinking "this should be relatively safe...") a couple years ago, and developed eczema all over my hands and arms. I have it "under control" now, but it has never gone away. That was my experience, anyway. I never had eczema there before.

#11 donjoe

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 06:29 AM

I used a little bit of 0.025% on the backs of my hands (thinking "this should be relatively safe...") a couple years ago, and developed eczema all over my hands and arms. I have it "under control" now, but it has never gone away. That was my experience, anyway. I never had eczema there before.

I was afraid you may be talking from personal experience. Sorry about the unlucky break.
However, since this substance has been on the market for 30 years or more(?) and there's still no mention of your type of experience in the precautions leaflet, I'd say there haven't been nearly enough cases to alert anyone - what you have there is probably a very special, extremely rare case (who knows what predisposition or complicating factor was also present). BTW, have you sought professional opinions on how/why it happened?

#12 Eva Victoria

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 05:49 PM

It could cause permanent eczema that never goes away... even where there was not pre-existing eczema. It's a pretty serious drug.

I haven't seen such a serious warning anywhere. Can you provide a reference for your assertion?


Neither have I! It can only cause contact dermatitis (eczema while using it).

#13 Eva Victoria

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 05:56 PM

I used a little bit of 0.025% on the backs of my hands (thinking "this should be relatively safe...") a couple years ago, and developed eczema all over my hands and arms. I have it "under control" now, but it has never gone away. That was my experience, anyway. I never had eczema there before.

I was afraid you may be talking from personal experience. Sorry about the unlucky break.
However, since this substance has been on the market for 30 years or more(?) and there's still no mention of your type of experience in the precautions leaflet, I'd say there haven't been nearly enough cases to alert anyone - what you have there is probably a very special, extremely rare case (who knows what predisposition or complicating factor was also present). BTW, have you sought professional opinions on how/why it happened?


Tretinoin was patented in 1987; it has not been on the market for more than 20 years :~

For more info:

RETIN-A
http://emc.medicines...ocumentid=16192

RENOVA
http://www.aboutreno.../New RNV PI.pdf

#14 Fredrik

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 09:11 PM

I was thinking of the original studies, some 30 years ago, in the anti-keratinization action of oral vitamin A that led to the use of topical A to minimize systemic toxicity. But you´re right, that was not topical tretinoin they used in the treatment of acne 30 years ago. My wrong :~ [ additional commentary: as Luminous pointed out in his post below tretinoin HAS in fact been prescribed since 1971] But it is this basic science that led to the use of topical A (tretinoin):

Action And Clinical Pharmacology:

The interest in oral vitamin A in the treatment of acne started some 30 years ago following publication of a report by Straumfjord and theoretical support for the use of the vitamin in the reduction of hyperkeratosis came from basic science investigations. Hunter and Pinkus showed a reduction in the number of keratinocytes in the human stratum corneum during oral vitamin A therapy. Fell and Mellanby noticed a suppression of keratinization by excessive vitamin A in tissue culture. This led to the opinion that vitamin A is antikeratinizing.

Topical use of vitamin A was suggested as a means of reducing systemic toxicity from vitamin A taken orally and a number of topical forms of vitamin A were tried. Topical tretinoin was found to be the most potent because of its greater peeling action.

Topical tretinoin has a very pronounced keratolytic action according to both Von Beer and Von Stuttgen. This action has led to its use in a number of dermatological conditions. It was tried successfully by Kligman et al in the treatment of acne vulgaris since follicular hyperkeratosis is considered as being an initial stage of acne.


http://www.rxmed.com.....20A ACID.html

Edited by fredrik, 15 February 2008 - 09:07 PM.


#15 luminous

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 05:57 AM

Tretinoin was patented in 1987; it has not been on the market for more than 20 years ;)

http://www.dermspec....ucts/retina.htm

Retin-A is tretinoin, a potent chemical derived from vitamin A...dermatologists have prescribed Retin-A since 1971...

;)

#16 niner

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 05:58 AM

I used a little bit of 0.025% on the backs of my hands (thinking "this should be relatively safe...") a couple years ago, and developed eczema all over my hands and arms. I have it "under control" now, but it has never gone away. That was my experience, anyway. I never had eczema there before.

I was afraid you may be talking from personal experience. Sorry about the unlucky break.
However, since this substance has been on the market for 30 years or more(?) and there's still no mention of your type of experience in the precautions leaflet, I'd say there haven't been nearly enough cases to alert anyone - what you have there is probably a very special, extremely rare case (who knows what predisposition or complicating factor was also present). BTW, have you sought professional opinions on how/why it happened?

I have seen doctors about it, and use a mid-range prescription steroid as needed, and moisturizers as much as possible. Everything I've seen about eczema seems to say there's "no cure" for it, although it might go into remission for a long time. It may be that the usual reaction is just a contact dermatitis and not "real" eczema. They do caution against using it in patients with eczema. I had a tiny bit of eczema on the back of my neck off and on around the time I used it, so I guess I was a "patient with eczema". It might well be that there are complicating factors here. I have a cat that I'm pretty attached to, but I've developed a cat allergy. Not touching the cat is sort of out of the question. I've noticed that when I'm away from him while traveling, the eczema doesn't seem to be a problem. I'm getting cat allergen shots, along with a bunch of other allergens. Eventually either the cat or I will die, and that might be the end of the problem. I'd prefer it to be the cat. That will be the ultimate experiment. The eczema did certainly arise within a day or so of using the tretinoin, and I'd never had it there before. Since it hasn't yet gone away, I'm not planning on trying any more tretinoin, though I'd very much like to partake of the miracle. I'm getting by with glycolic acid, Juvess, and sunscreen at the moment.

#17 donjoe

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:59 AM

OK, but

have you sought professional opinions on how/why it happened?

;)

#18 Eva Victoria

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 02:10 PM

Tretinoin was patented in 1987; it has not been on the market for more than 20 years ;)

http://www.dermspec....ucts/retina.htm

Retin-A is tretinoin, a potent chemical derived from vitamin A...dermatologists have prescribed Retin-A since 1971...

;)


I might be wrong, but as far as I know the clinical evidence (about the anti-aging effects) was not estabilished before the 1980s, although researchers already had experiments on tretinoin topically applied in the 1960s.
There are some studies from Kligman from 1993 where he summarieses his results of long therm usage of tretinoin topically applied for 5-6 years.

See also:
http://dermatologyti...l.jsp?id=119844

"In 1984, Dr. Kligman and colleagues were the first to report, based on an animal model, that topical tretinoin enhanced repair of dermal connective tissue damaged by ultraviolet exposure."

#19 luminous

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 02:32 PM

Tretinoin was patented in 1987; it has not been on the market for more than 20 years ;)

http://www.dermspec....ucts/retina.htm

Retin-A is tretinoin, a potent chemical derived from vitamin A...dermatologists have prescribed Retin-A since 1971...

;)


I might be wrong, but as far as I know the clinical evidence (about the anti-aging effects) was not estabilished before the 1980s, although researchers already had experiments on tretinoin topically applied in the 1960s.
There are some studies from Kligman from 1993 where he summarieses his results of long therm usage of tretinoin topically applied for 5-6 years.

See also:
http://dermatologyti...l.jsp?id=119844

"In 1984, Dr. Kligman and colleagues were the first to report, based on an animal model, that topical tretinoin enhanced repair of dermal connective tissue damaged by ultraviolet exposure."

Nothing "might" about it. The rest of your post does nothing to refute what I said nor your original correction of fredrik. Anyone can make a mistake. It's the rare individual who can admit it.

Edited by luminous, 15 February 2008 - 02:33 PM.


#20 donjoe

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:02 AM

I'm also using retin-a. Does anyone know what cream I should use with it? (During the day)

Sure: a moisturizer.

Laquieze S, Czernielewski J, Rueda MJ.
Beneficial effect of a moisturizing cream as adjunctive treatment to oral isotretinoin or topical tretinoin in the management of acne.
J Drugs Dermatol. 2006 Nov-Dec;5(10):985-90.
PMID: 17373148 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum


And since it makes you more photosensitive (assuming you weren't already very "white" when you started), it also makes sense to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen (of course, this also makes sense for a number of other, maybe more important, reasons).

Edited by donjoe, 17 February 2008 - 08:06 AM.


#21 Time Traveller

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 11:39 PM

As an aside (and yet still on topic), while rummaging around the other day, I found Dr Albert Kligman's patent (filed in 1985) for using tretinoin to treat the effects of aging on the skin...

http://www.freepaten...om/4603146.html

For those of you who haven't seen it before, It's quite an interesting read, and also a piece of history. For those of you who have seen it before, I apologise for wasting valuable seconds of your life span. ;)


#22 Eva Victoria

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 02:38 PM

It is the file of Dr K. for the US Patent of Tretinoin (1985, publishing: 1986). This is the date to what dermatologists refer to as Tretinoin is used as treating photoaging. (Before it was only used as an agent to treat acne.)
Very interesting article indeed! I have only seen different summaries of it but I would like to thank you for posting it! :p


As an aside (and yet still on topic), while rummaging around the other day, I found Dr Albert Kligman's patent (filed in 1985) for using tretinoin to treat the effects of aging on the skin...

http://www.freepaten...om/4603146.html

For those of you who haven't seen it before, It's quite an interesting read, and also a piece of history. For those of you who have seen it before, I apologise for wasting valuable seconds of your life span. ;)


Edited by Eva Victoria, 04 March 2008 - 02:46 PM.


#23 undertoad

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:55 PM

Does anyone know the shelf-life of Retin-A? I've had a couple tubes sitting around in the cabinet for a few years, and wonder if they're still okay to use. The cream seems fine...it's not gritty or changed in any observable way.

#24 Eva Victoria

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 08:25 PM

If it is in a stable container well protected against air and the temp. is not over 25C, it should be fine for at least 2 years.


Does anyone know the shelf-life of Retin-A? I've had a couple tubes sitting around in the cabinet for a few years, and wonder if they're still okay to use. The cream seems fine...it's not gritty or changed in any observable way.



#25 Brainbox

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 08:31 PM

Hehe, those would be great pictures if the hair color didn't change between them as well (which I'm sure has nothing to do with tretinoin). :-D

Haha, it seems evident that this evidence is not entirely evidential.

#26 Time Traveller

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 11:16 PM

Hehe, those would be great pictures if the hair color didn't change between them as well (which I'm sure has nothing to do with tretinoin). :)

You can't blame the dear lady though - the improvement in her complexion probably inspired her to improve her appearance in other ways. :~

#27 Brainbox

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Posted 25 May 2008 - 09:41 PM

Found this one in my weekly pubmed query on tretinoin... :-D

A review of tazarotene in the treatment of photodamaged skin.Ogden S, Samuel M, Griffiths CE.
Dermatology Centre, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Salford Manchester, M6 8HD, UK. stephanie.ogden@hotmail.co.uk

Chronic sun exposure leads to photodamage, which is characterized clinically by fine and coarse wrinkles, dyspigmentation, telangiectasia, laxity, roughness and a sallow appearance. Many treatments claim to reduce the signs of photodamage, however evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCT) to support these claims is limited. The use of topical retinoids, particularly tretinoin, isotretinoin and tazarotene, has been shown to significantly reduce signs of photodamage both clinically and histologically. Over recent years a number of RCTs, have affirmed that topical tazarotene is an effective and safe treatment for photodamaged skin.

PMID: 18488880 [PubMed - in process]


Edited by brainbox, 25 May 2008 - 09:43 PM.





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