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The Latest Alzheimer's Research


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1215 replies to this topic

#1201 mag1

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 04:55 AM

I am going to take a complete leap into the unknown on this one.

If you remove amyloid from plasma, then this could have an osmotic like action in flushing out other amyloid as it tries to equilibriate under the new amyloid depleted conditions.

 

This would seem to be a large step forward for Alzheimer's care.

These treatments are already available.

The clinical trial has been ongoing for 7 years, so they should have some idea how this treatment carries forward over the longer haul.

It would be very startling if a 60% reduction in decline could be maintained over a multi-year followup.

 


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#1202 Phoebus

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 06:01 AM

Here is another thought 

 

Why not use the plasmapherasis method to PREVENT Alzheimers in the first place? Why not put those at risk of Alz on the treatment, thus preventing it from ever taking off in the first place. 


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#1203 mag1

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 02:58 PM

The problem with Alzheimer's prevention is that it can be hard to know whether you have stopped something from happening: It just might not have happened anyways. To answer this question, clinical trials involving those with pre-AD need to be followed for years until progression to mild dementia occurs. Companies typically avoid such research as it can be quite expensive, while sometimes implying that early stage patients do benefit (even when this has not been proven) because the later stage patients benefited.

 

The cited plasmapheresis research did actually run into this problem. Statistically significant results for those with early dementia were not demonstrated. This is not overly surprising because the early stage patients on treatment along with those on placebo did not progress. It has been found that often early stage patients do not actually go on to to develop full AD and even when they do progress it can occur gradually. 

 

Considering the overwhelming cost of Alzheimer's, this might be a great opportunity for governments and/or others to step forward with some research dollars. Spending $100 million to determine whether this latest treatment might help those with early AD would be a shrewd investment seen from the macro-scale. AD is costing the global economy close to $2 billion per DAY. Can we actually afford not to invest this money? (Hint: Answer is NO). 

 

I probably should backtrack on my proposed mechanism of action. Lowering amyloid has up till this point not been found to be an effective anti-dementing tactic. In fact, amyloid levels tend to fall once neurodegeneration is underway. It is then entirely possible that something else is going on that is producing the therapeutic effect. With pharmaceuticals, it is typically true that the exact identity of what is going on is not known; the accepted mechanisms of action are often discovered after further investigation to have been incorrect. At this point, we should all be grateful that something does appear to help, even if the why it works question is somewhat obscure.   

 


Edited by mag1, 14 March 2019 - 03:40 PM.


#1204 mag1

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 01:44 AM

Just in from the CDC: Alzheimer Epidemiology in the US.

This would surely suggest that people would tend to want a larger role of a government that provides protection against this unknown.

Plasmapheresis would tend to counter such a perspective as it offers a realistic path to self-managing this risk.  

 

https://www.cdc.gov/...sr68_02-508.pdf


Edited by mag1, 15 March 2019 - 01:45 AM.


#1205 lancebr

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 08:08 AM

So, based upon this study would taking Ferulic acid and/or ECGC be of use for AD?

 

 

http://www.jbc.org/content/294/8/2714



#1206 albedo

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 10:25 AM

Alzheimer's Blood Test Shows 94% Accuracy - Mass spectrometry assay and genetic screen predict brain amyloidosis

 

https://www.medpaget...rsdisease/81379



#1207 mag1

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 11:05 PM

http://investors.bio...heimers-disease



#1208 mag1

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 02:05 PM

Aducanumab- the first Alzheimer treatment to have shown disease modification in phase 3 trials and no one is interested?



#1209 ta5

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 05:26 AM

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Dec 17;16(24). pii: E5152.

Siblerud R1, Mutter J2, Moore E3, Naumann J4, Walach H5.
Mercury is one of the most toxic elements and causes a multitude of health problems. It is ten times more toxic to neurons than lead. This study was created to determine if mercury could be causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) by cross referencing the effects of mercury with 70 factors associated with AD. The results found that all these factors could be attributed to mercury. The hallmark changes in AD include plaques, beta amyloid protein, neurofibrillary tangles, phosphorylated tau protein, and memory loss-all changes that can be caused by mercury. Neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, and norepinephrine are inhibited in patients with Alzheimer's disease, with the same inhibition occurring in mercury toxicity. Enzyme dysfunction in patients with Alzheimer's disease include BACE 1, gamma secretase, cyclooxygenase-2, cytochrome-c-oxidase, protein kinases, monoamine oxidase, nitric oxide synthetase, acetyl choline transferase, and caspases, all which can be explained by mercury toxicity. Immune and inflammatory responses seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease also occur when cells are exposed to mercury, including complement activation, cytokine expression, production of glial fibrillary acid protein antibodies and interleukin-1, transforming growth factor, beta 2 microglobulins, and phosphodiesterase 4 stimulation. Genetic factors in patients with Alzheimer's disease are also associated with mercury. Apolipoprotein E 4 allele increases the toxicity of mercury. Mercury can inhibit DNA synthesis in the hippocampus, and has been associated with genetic mutations of presenilin 1 and 2, found in AD. The abnormalities of minerals and vitamins, specifically aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, selenium, zinc, and vitamins B1, B12, E, and C, that occur in patients with Alzheimer's disease, also occur in mercury toxicity. Aluminum has been found to increase mercury's toxicity. Likewise, similar biochemical factors in AD are affected by mercury, including changes in blood levels of homocysteine, arachidonic acid, DHEA sulfate, glutathione, hydrogen peroxide, glycosamine glycans, acetyl-L carnitine, melatonin, and HDL. Other factors seen in Alzheimer's disease, such as increased platelet activation, poor odor identification, hypertension, depression, increased incidences of herpes virus and chlamydia infections, also occur in mercury exposure. In addition, patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease exhibit higher levels of brain mercury, blood mercury, and tissue mercury in some studies. The greatest exogenous sources of brain mercury come from dental amalgams. Conclusion: This review of the literature strongly suggests that mercury can be a cause of Alzheimer's Disease.
PMID: 31861093

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#1210 ceridwen

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 10:16 AM

@mag1 I read somewhere that aducanumab causes lesions in APOE4 carriers

#1211 mag1

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 03:02 AM

cerdiwen, Happy New Year!

 

The big excitement is about methylene blue/LMTM.

It looks like it truly is a cure for Alzheimer's.

The numbers overwhelmingly support the efficacy of MB/LMTM.

 

 

They reported the initial phase 2 result in 2008, though it was quite murky at the time.

Then they reported 2 phase 3's in 2016 and it was still quite murky.

 

Now they have published further clarification and the uncertainties have been resolved.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC6918900/

 

What happened in the phase 3 trials was the placebo was actually active treatment.

When you take away the treatment effect in the placebo group and maximize the treatment effect in those in the active treatment arms,

then there is a very large treatment effect. It appears that progression is almost stopped for at least roughly 1 year.

 

This is massive massive news.

There can no longer be equivocation, MB/LMTM is an effective Alzheimer's treatment.

 

Feel the love!

A world where Alzheimer's is a treatable illness has arrived!

 

 

Happy New Year everyone!

Let the party begin!

 

 

 


Edited by mag1, 03 January 2020 - 03:06 AM.

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#1212 albedo

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 10:01 AM

From The Lancet commission. Focus on prevention for dementia. Interesting:

 

Dementia prevention, intervention, and care: 2020 report of the Lancet Commission

https://www.thelance...0367-6/fulltext

 

Attached File  dementia 2.PNG   24.2KB   0 downloads

Attached File  dementia 1.PNG   57.54KB   0 downloads



#1213 albedo

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 02:12 PM

Another reason to check our iron and ferritin levels?

Kletetschka, G., Bazala, R., Takáč, M. et al. Magnetic domains oscillation in the brain with neurodegenerative disease. Sci Rep 11, 714 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1...598-020-80212-5

https://www.nature.c...-80212-5#citeas


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#1214 albedo

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 09:37 AM

"BURLINGAME, Calif., May 13, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Pharmaceutical trials for Alzheimer's have failed repeatedly, but a new study, using a fundamentally different approach, has provided the first success: using precision medicine to identify and target the drivers of Alzheimer's or pre-Alzheimer's in each patient, a team of physicians and researchers has posted exciting, positive results in medRxiv, the Yale-backed site for health sciences."

Attached File  AD Bredesen.PNG   118.58KB   0 downloads

 

https://www.biospace...mer-s-patients/

https://www.biospace...in-alzheimer-s/


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#1215 albedo

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Posted 09 June 2021 - 05:58 AM

F.D.A. Approves Alzheimer’s Drug Despite Fierce Debate Over Whether It Works

https://www.nytimes....imers-drug.html


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#1216 albedo

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 12:46 PM

Bench-to-bedside drug design could lead to new Alzheimer’s Disease treatments

https://www.gla.ac.u..._820111_en.html


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