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[This] Forum Overlooks [a product] Which Activates More genes,not just


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#1 jiggy

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 12:15 PM


Thought this was a very interesting article - makes you question reservatrol...................article below


60 Minutes Blunder: News Report on Resveratrol Overlooks Longevinex® Which Activates More Longevity Genes than Resveratrol Red Wine Molecule or Calorie Restricted Diet

  • Saturday January 31, 2009, 2:44 pm EST
SAN DIMAS, Calif., Jan. 31 /PRNewswire/ -- In a recent episode of 60 Minutes, newsman Morley Safer was mistakenly led by researchers to believe the only current way to add more healthy years to one's lifespan is to drink impossible amounts of red wine (1000 bottles a day) or wait for a drug company to invent a magic pill based on resveratrol, a substance found in the skin of grapes and concentrated in red wine. What 60 Minutes viewers weren't told was that Longevinex®, a leading dietary supplement already on the market, now provides such benefits to consumers, as proven in a recent gene array study, according to its spokesman, Bill Sardi.

"The French are drinking 3 to 5 glasses of dark, aged, red wine per day and living longer and healthier than populations in other developed nations," says Sardi. The French have far more centenarians per capita than any other country, a testament to the healthy properties of red wine. The new and more economical option to red wine is to consume pills that provide concentrated red wine molecules, like resveratrol, quercetin and ferulic acid, says Sardi. While there has been considerable attention given to one red wine molecule, resveratrol, a recent study shows an array of natural molecules produces a more profound genomic effect than plain resveratrol.

In a head-to-head comparison, a unique patent-applied-for matrix of molecules (resveratrol, quercetin, IP6 rice bran) as provided in Longevinex® activated 9-fold more longevity genes (1711) than plain resveratrol (225 genes) or a calorie restricted diet (198 genes) at a dose of resveratrol 17-320 times lower than prior studies.

Researchers interviewed on 60 MINUTES failed to mention a study published last September in Experimental Gerontology which showed that Longevinex® rapidly mimicked the genomic effect of calorie restriction in laboratory mice, an effect that otherwise takes life-long food deprivation to produce. [Experimental Gerontology 2008 Sept; 43(9):859-66] The public was deprived of hearing about a major breakthrough in longevity science.

Studies show the healthy range of wine consumption is 3-5 glasses a day. Sardi says the point of a well designed red wine pill is to provide about the same quantity of mineral-controlling molecules provided in 3-5 glasses of red wine, or about 180-300 mg, without the alcohol, sugar, calories and sulfite preservatives, at a cost that ~5-6 times less than wine. A $6 bottle of wine would cost ~3-5 a day to provide health benefits. The cost of Longevinex®, a red wine pill designed to provide the equivalent amount of molecules found in 3-5 glasses of wine, is less than $1 per day.

Researchers interviewed on 60 Minutes also failed to mention that mega-dose (360 mg and 1565 mg human equivalent) resveratrol shortened the lives of laboratory mice in a study published in August of 2008. [Cell Metabolism 2008 August; 8(2):157-68] "Lower doses and multiple molecules, as provided in Longevinex®, work better and are safer, as attested by red wine drinkers," says Sardi.

Morley Safer, reporter for CBS' 60 MINUTES, ended his report by asking: "When do WE get this pill?" The best answer, short of conducting 99-year human studies, is to consume the same amount of red wine molecules as the French, about 180-300 milligrams per day, "which is what Longevinex® provides," says Sardi.

The genomic study comparing a calorie restricted diet, plain resveratrol and Longevinex® can be viewed online at www.longevinex.com



Country Centenarian Total Centenarians Wine intake Caloric population population per million /liters per intake population annum France 20,000(2008) 65 million 307.6 55.8 3653 Japan 36,000(2008) 127 million 283.4 1.9 2760 United States 55,000(2008) 305 million 180.3 8.7 3774 England 9,330(2007) 58 million 160.8 18.9 3412

#2 drmz

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 12:52 PM

nice marketing. Seo away.....

Edited by drmz, 17 February 2009 - 12:55 PM.


Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 Crepulance

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 01:10 PM

C'mon drmz, you guys don't always have to think someone's marketing. He's fairly new to the site, it could be the first time he's seen the article and is posting it. That's how you guys made me feel when I first joined too. It's not very inviting, and probably will deter him from posting as often as he'd like. Jiggy, go on with your badself. Post anything you'd like that's interesting. I actually am also concerned about what's found in that report. I've been replied to with info about it on another thread, but haven't had a chance to read it yet. Cheers

Crep

nice marketing. Seo away.....


Edited by Crepulance, 17 February 2009 - 01:11 PM.


#4 drmz

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 02:06 PM

C'mon drmz, you guys don't always have to think someone's marketing. He's fairly new to the site, it could be the first time he's seen the article and is posting it. That's how you guys made me feel when I first joined too. It's not very inviting, and probably will deter him from posting as often as he'd like. Jiggy, go on with your badself. Post anything you'd like that's interesting. I actually am also concerned about what's found in that report. I've been replied to with info about it on another thread, but haven't had a chance to read it yet. Cheers

Crep

nice marketing. Seo away.....



My comments were aimed at the writer of the article, not the poster.

#5 hmm

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 08:20 PM

C'mon drmz, you guys don't always have to think someone's marketing. He's fairly new to the site, it could be the first time he's seen the article and is posting it. That's how you guys made me feel when I first joined too. It's not very inviting, and probably will deter him from posting as often as he'd like. Jiggy, go on with your badself. Post anything you'd like that's interesting. I actually am also concerned about what's found in that report. I've been replied to with info about it on another thread, but haven't had a chance to read it yet. Cheers

Crep

nice marketing. Seo away.....



My comments were aimed at the writer of the article, not the poster.

No matter what you aimed at, you probably scored a hit -- Crep = Sardi = writer of Longevinex article = jiggy . Though I would like to think that Sardi is well enough off so that he can have a minion or two perfom this silliness rather than doing it all himself...

#6 JLL

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 10:19 PM

So why not just buy resveratrol, quercetin and IP-6 separately?

#7 maxwatt

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 10:33 PM

So why not just buy resveratrol, quercetin and IP-6 separately?


Because quercetin is known to block Sirt1, the opposite of what one want's to do with resveratrol; IP-6 can lead to anemia, as it does in third-world countries where the traditional diet is high in phytates. One should probably check one iron status before supplementing with anything containing IP-6. If one's hematocrit is within normal range, it is not necessary and could be harmful. Pregnant women should not supplement with IP-6 because the risk of anemia.
I do not consider Longevinex to be a resveratrol supplement, though it contains some resveratrol. There is more quercetin in it than there is resveratrol.

Edited by maxwatt, 17 February 2009 - 10:35 PM.


#8 kismet

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 11:00 PM

What do you people take IP-6 for? And how much? Why should there be a risk of iron deficiency (i.e. 1mg of IP-6 chelates x mg iron?).

#9 maxwatt

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 11:28 PM

What do you people take IP-6 for? And how much? Why should there be a risk of iron deficiency (i.e. 1mg of IP-6 chelates x mg iron?).

Search for IP6 in the Supplements section of the forum where it has been discussed.

#10 joe57777

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 06:13 AM

It gets to be more than a little frustrating when you are a beginner at this Resveratrol issue. I guess I can speak for many people, like me, who are looking into Resveratrol and trying to come up with the best brand and dosage that will benefit me the most with the least amount of side effects. However, everytime I get close to making that decision, somebody just "shoots it down" for one reason or another. I am very open-minded about Resveratrol, therefore, I have been taking a while to make up my mind about which brand and dosage is best for me. So far I would like to think that I have chosen to use (Longevinex) because I like the idea behind that brand. For example, 1). I have heard that the founders of the mice experiment developed Longevinex. 2). I have heard that lower doses of (as contained in Longevinex) Resveratrol are actually better for you than larger doses. 3). Longevinex contains (I would believe to be the correct amount) of Quercetin, which has been said to bind with Resveratrol at the right time so it can survive the Liver. Quercetin, I believe, has also been said to open up more longevity genes. 4). Longevinex also contains vitamin D-3, which has just released a study that it helps prevent cancer by 77%. 5). I like the idea of how Longevinex is encapsulated to preserve the Resveratrol molecule. All I am doing is putting the pieces together (not marketing). To sum it up, it sounds to me like Longevinex has the right balance of Resveratrol and other supporting ingredients that make you believe that in a Lonevinex pill or two per day you have not just Reveratrol doing all the "miracle type" work here. I like the idea of that. It seems that there was a thought process when they developed Longevinex. But with all of these various threads that by themselves and making people try to pull all the information together from these many threads. Then you have people putting down different brands for different reasons that are possibly just confusing people (especially newbies like myself). Therefore, it becomes more difficult to put a finger on the correct brand and dosage of Resveratrol to be confident to start taking it yet without further research. Therefore, it would be nice if we started a thread that just asks simply: "What brand and dosage of Resveratrol are you taking and why, as well as what has it done for you and are there any lasting side effects?" In addition, a thread should be started that says: "Has anybody actually, in all honesty, backed up with documented proof, found that a certain brand and dosage of Resveratrol sucessfully treats any diseases including Cancer in humans?" But finally before I decide, I am going to contact Bill Sardi myself at Longevinex and get some answers to some peoples negativity toward Longevinex and then I will try to have those answers "double Checked" for accuracy before I make a Longevinex purchase. Of course, I will post my findings here with a post to hopefully help the next person(s) out who are maybe "on the fence" about Longevinex. Maybe it's all BS but I am going to try and find out!

Edited by joe57777, 18 February 2009 - 06:33 AM.


#11 kismet

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 10:46 AM

What do you people take IP-6 for? And how much? Why should there be a risk of iron deficiency (i.e. 1mg of IP-6 chelates x mg iron?).

Search for IP6 in the Supplements section of the forum where it has been discussed.

Damn, but searching is so tedious.  :p It's just that there seem to be many misconceptions about IP-6. I hoped we could educate some who may be taking IP-6 for the wrong reasons. Maybe that's not the right thread anyway, so nevermind. 

joe57777, paragraphs please.

#12 JLL

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 10:59 AM

So why not just buy resveratrol, quercetin and IP-6 separately?


Because quercetin is known to block Sirt1, the opposite of what one want's to do with resveratrol; IP-6 can lead to anemia, as it does in third-world countries where the traditional diet is high in phytates. One should probably check one iron status before supplementing with anything containing IP-6. If one's hematocrit is within normal range, it is not necessary and could be harmful. Pregnant women should not supplement with IP-6 because the risk of anemia.
I do not consider Longevinex to be a resveratrol supplement, though it contains some resveratrol. There is more quercetin in it than there is resveratrol.


Have you read the latest posts in the quercetin/Sirt1 threads? It seems like quercetin does not block Sirt1 after all, and it also improves the bioavailability of resveratrol.

I know a lot of people here take iron chelators, and personally, I'm more worried about my iron levels being too high than low. I get too much iron from food anyway.

#13 maxwatt

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 12:32 PM

So why not just buy resveratrol, quercetin and IP-6 separately?


Because quercetin is known to block Sirt1, the opposite of what one want's to do with resveratrol; IP-6 can lead to anemia, as it does in third-world countries where the traditional diet is high in phytates. One should probably check one iron status before supplementing with anything containing IP-6. If one's hematocrit is within normal range, it is not necessary and could be harmful. Pregnant women should not supplement with IP-6 because the risk of anemia.
I do not consider Longevinex to be a resveratrol supplement, though it contains some resveratrol. There is more quercetin in it than there is resveratrol.


Have you read the latest posts in the quercetin/Sirt1 threads? It seems like quercetin does not block Sirt1 after all, and it also improves the bioavailability of resveratrol.

I know a lot of people here take iron chelators, and personally, I'm more worried about my iron levels being too high than low. I get too much iron from food anyway.


That is an interesting piece on quercetin that geddarkstorm posted after I wrote the above, and I've not yet had time to study the sources. However, the Sinclair paper from 2006 which found that a quercetin metabolite inhibited Sirt1, also found that quercetin did not prolong the lifespan of C. elegans, whereas resveratrol did. I am open-minded but cautious.

If you have reason to worry about your iron levels, as do many middle-aged men of northern European descent, IP6 could be helpful. For most young men, particularly if they are physically active, it could be a disaster if it contributed to anemia. For women of child-bearing age even more so. Maybe a warning on the label is in order. Iron level tests are a routine part of any physical examination. If they are truly abnormal, our doctor will test and then treat you for polycythmemia or hemachromatosis by taking blood very month. If the level is merely above average and not so high as to indicate disease or warrant blood-letting under current approved practice, you might want to try IP6 as an alternate self-treatment. Whether this will contribute to health or longevity is unknown. Theory suggests to some that that lowering iron levels in otherwise healthy individuals will increase longevity, but it seems to me uncertain.Other attempts to lower a marker in otherwise healthy individuals to some arbitrarily lower level are proving to be not helpful in increasing life-span: cholesterol and blood sugar are two. While those with low levels may live longer, lowering someone's level if it is marginally high has not been proven to change overall mortality in the studies that have been performed.

Edited by maxwatt, 18 February 2009 - 12:33 PM.


#14 JLL

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 04:46 PM

I had a blood sample taken a year ago, but apparently it didn't include iron levels. It does have red and white blood cell counts and hemoglobin; do these correlate with actual iron levels?

#15 maxwatt

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 06:05 PM

I had a blood sample taken a year ago, but apparently it didn't include iron levels. It does have red and white blood cell counts and hemoglobin; do these correlate with actual iron levels?


hemoglobin correlates. The testing lab should flag any high values. If you doctor is not happy to discuss the test results with you, find another doctor.

#16 renwosing

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 06:59 PM

Longevinex is a formulation. Whereas other brands are just resveratrol, be it high purity, micronised etc.

So take note of that.

If you want a balance, you have to keep on exploring and do your own trial and error.
Every body is made up differently.

Renwosing

#17 joe57777

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 07:40 AM

Have you read the latest posts in the quercetin/Sirt1 threads? It seems like quercetin does not block Sirt1 after all, and it also improves the bioavailability of resveratrol.

I know a lot of people here take iron chelators, and personally, I'm more worried about my iron levels being too high than low. I get too much iron from food anyway.
[/quote]


First of all sorry about my early posts having no paragraphs..... But I agree with you 100%. As I explained in my long post, Quercetin helps Resveratrol survive the Liver by clinging to it somehow so that it does not break down in the Liver. Also, I highly agree with the (theory and or fact) that too much iron in adults over 21 rust in our bodies and damage important longevity cells which inturn helps do the opposite of what we are trying to have Resveratrol fight aginst. Aging! I did read where vitamin C is a good iron chelator. Exercise can also help.

#18 maxwatt

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 11:39 AM

Have you read the latest posts in the quercetin/Sirt1 threads? It seems like quercetin does not block Sirt1 after all, and it also improves the bioavailability of resveratrol.

I know a lot of people here take iron chelators, and personally, I'm more worried about my iron levels being too high than low. I get too much iron from food anyway.


First of all sorry about my early posts having no paragraphs..... But I agree with you 100%. As I explained in my long post, Quercetin helps Resveratrol survive the Liver by clinging to it somehow so that it does not break down in the Liver. Also, I highly agree with the (theory and or fact) that too much iron in adults over 21 rust in our bodies and damage important longevity cells which inturn helps do the opposite of what we are trying to have Resveratrol fight aginst. Aging! I did read where vitamin C is a good iron chelator. Exercise can also help.


:) I don't think I can respond to this in a detailed manner. I hope it is intended as parody?

#19 JLL

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 01:07 PM

I had a blood sample taken a year ago, but apparently it didn't include iron levels. It does have red and white blood cell counts and hemoglobin; do these correlate with actual iron levels?


hemoglobin correlates. The testing lab should flag any high values. If you doctor is not happy to discuss the test results with you, find another doctor.


Well, my hemoglobin is flagged as high. It's always been very high; it's also high in everyone on my mother's side, even though we eat quite differently. So apparently if you have the genes for it (meaning high hemoglobin), your iron level is going to be high regardless of whether your intake is medium or high (I don't want to say low because none of us is a vegetarian)?

#20 maxwatt

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 05:42 PM

I had a blood sample taken a year ago, but apparently it didn't include iron levels. It does have red and white blood cell counts and hemoglobin; do these correlate with actual iron levels?


hemoglobin correlates. The testing lab should flag any high values. If you doctor is not happy to discuss the test results with you, find another doctor.


Well, my hemoglobin is flagged as high. It's always been very high; it's also high in everyone on my mother's side, even though we eat quite differently. So apparently if you have the genes for it (meaning high hemoglobin), your iron level is going to be high regardless of whether your intake is medium or high (I don't want to say low because none of us is a vegetarian)?


Some people have unusually high hemoglobin levels. Do you know your hematocrit? You may just have more red blood cells than average. This is useful if you live, say, in the Andes. or need to perform work at your aerobic threshold for prolonged periods. It is not necessarily unhealthy. If your mother's side of the family lived to ripe old age with it, don't worry. If they died young of hemachromatosis, start donating blood every month.

#21 JLL

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 06:08 PM

Some people have unusually high hemoglobin levels. Do you know your hematocrit? You may just have more red blood cells than average. This is useful if you live, say, in the Andes. or need to perform work at your aerobic threshold for prolonged periods. It is not necessarily unhealthy. If your mother's side of the family lived to ripe old age with it, don't worry. If they died young of hemachromatosis, start donating blood every month.


Thanks for your help. Here are my results:

B-Leuk (white blood cells): 4.7 E9/l
B-Eryt: 5.53 E12/l
Hemoglobin*: 170 g/l
Hematocrit*: 51 %
E-MCV (red blood cell size): 92 fl
E-MCH (hemoglobin in red blood cells): 31 pg
E-MCHC: 335

* These are slightly above reference values.

And yes, my mother's side of the family is long-lived. My grandfather also had high hemoglobin and he lived to be 90 something.

#22 Marco P.

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 06:44 PM

From Joe's post: But finally before I decide, I am going to contact Bill Sardi myself at Longevinex and get some answers to some peoples negativity toward Longevinex and then I will try to have those answers "double Checked" for accuracy before I make a Longevinex purchase. Of course, I will post my findings here with a post to hopefully help the next person(s) out who are maybe "on the fence" about Longevinex. Maybe it's all BS but I am going to try and find out!
[/quote]


I'm new here but I've been doing a lot of research on the topic. I look forward to hearing if Sardi responds Joe and, if he does, what his info is, recognizing that it will be partially "spin."
I've recently read the book The Longevity Factor, the only one that looks seriously at Resveratrol, and then purchased Bioforte from Biotivia. I think it may have aggravated my wife's fibromyalgia, but I'm not sure.
As I've continued reading I now think I want to play it a little safer with a lower dose than the 250mg of Bioforte. Is Longevinex the best one to try for a lower dose? No one knows. This is all somewhat risky experimentation, but then again, so are most vitamins and supplements!

I may try Longevinex (one of those discussed in the book) for a month and just see how I feel. My wife will probably wait and see. There are also some reports that Resveratrol may affect estrogen, not an interaction women should take lightly.

Thanks.

Marco

#23 maxwatt

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Posted 19 February 2009 - 09:02 PM

Some people have unusually high hemoglobin levels. Do you know your hematocrit? You may just have more red blood cells than average. This is useful if you live, say, in the Andes. or need to perform work at your aerobic threshold for prolonged periods. It is not necessarily unhealthy. If your mother's side of the family lived to ripe old age with it, don't worry. If they died young of hemachromatosis, start donating blood every month.


Thanks for your help. Here are my results:

B-Leuk (white blood cells): 4.7 E9/l
B-Eryt: 5.53 E12/l
Hemoglobin*: 170 g/l
Hematocrit*: 51 %
E-MCV (red blood cell size): 92 fl
E-MCH (hemoglobin in red blood cells): 31 pg
E-MCHC: 335

* These are slightly above reference values.

And yes, my mother's side of the family is long-lived. My grandfather also had high hemoglobin and he lived to be 90 something.

I doubt you've anything to worry about. You seem to be in the high normal range. Hematocrit under 53 is considered normal by most labs, and 170 is minimally high for Hemoglobin. You might do very well at endurance sports like distance running or cycling if you cared to try them. I'd think any attempt to reduce your numbers would likely do more harm then good.

#24 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:39 AM

Oh, sorry then :)


Crep

C'mon drmz, you guys don't always have to think someone's marketing. He's fairly new to the site, it could be the first time he's seen the article and is posting it. That's how you guys made me feel when I first joined too. It's not very inviting, and probably will deter him from posting as often as he'd like. Jiggy, go on with your badself. Post anything you'd like that's interesting. I actually am also concerned about what's found in that report. I've been replied to with info about it on another thread, but haven't had a chance to read it yet. Cheers

Crep

nice marketing. Seo away.....



My comments were aimed at the writer of the article, not the poster.



#25 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:41 AM

You must have scored well on your aptitude tests. Your deduction skills are impecable.


Crep

C'mon drmz, you guys don't always have to think someone's marketing. He's fairly new to the site, it could be the first time he's seen the article and is posting it. That's how you guys made me feel when I first joined too. It's not very inviting, and probably will deter him from posting as often as he'd like. Jiggy, go on with your badself. Post anything you'd like that's interesting. I actually am also concerned about what's found in that report. I've been replied to with info about it on another thread, but haven't had a chance to read it yet. Cheers

Crep

nice marketing. Seo away.....



My comments were aimed at the writer of the article, not the poster.

No matter what you aimed at, you probably scored a hit -- Crep = Sardi = writer of Longevinex article = jiggy . Though I would like to think that Sardi is well enough off so that he can have a minion or two perfom this silliness rather than doing it all himself...



#26 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:43 AM

Convenience. I did try to buy ip6, couldn't find. I did buy quercetin, didn't feel the same results, but maybe because I didn't have the ip6, or maybe it was the change in res dosage. Question, it says longevin activates 1000 or however longevity genes. Does anyone know which genes these are?


Crep

So why not just buy resveratrol, quercetin and IP-6 separately?



#27 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:47 AM

Oh my gosh joe do you realize what you just said? Saying what you said around these people might make you want to be careful before you start your car in the morning. PS, don't be surprised if your post gets deleted.

Crep

It gets to be more than a little frustrating when you are a beginner at this Resveratrol issue. I guess I can speak for many people, like me, who are looking into Resveratrol and trying to come up with the best brand and dosage that will benefit me the most with the least amount of side effects. However, everytime I get close to making that decision, somebody just "shoots it down" for one reason or another. I am very open-minded about Resveratrol, therefore, I have been taking a while to make up my mind about which brand and dosage is best for me. So far I would like to think that I have chosen to use (Longevinex) because I like the idea behind that brand. For example, 1). I have heard that the founders of the mice experiment developed Longevinex. 2). I have heard that lower doses of (as contained in Longevinex) Resveratrol are actually better for you than larger doses. 3). Longevinex contains (I would believe to be the correct amount) of Quercetin, which has been said to bind with Resveratrol at the right time so it can survive the Liver. Quercetin, I believe, has also been said to open up more longevity genes. 4). Longevinex also contains vitamin D-3, which has just released a study that it helps prevent cancer by 77%. 5). I like the idea of how Longevinex is encapsulated to preserve the Resveratrol molecule. All I am doing is putting the pieces together (not marketing). To sum it up, it sounds to me like Longevinex has the right balance of Resveratrol and other supporting ingredients that make you believe that in a Lonevinex pill or two per day you have not just Reveratrol doing all the "miracle type" work here. I like the idea of that. It seems that there was a thought process when they developed Longevinex. But with all of these various threads that by themselves and making people try to pull all the information together from these many threads. Then you have people putting down different brands for different reasons that are possibly just confusing people (especially newbies like myself). Therefore, it becomes more difficult to put a finger on the correct brand and dosage of Resveratrol to be confident to start taking it yet without further research. Therefore, it would be nice if we started a thread that just asks simply: "What brand and dosage of Resveratrol are you taking and why, as well as what has it done for you and are there any lasting side effects?" In addition, a thread should be started that says: "Has anybody actually, in all honesty, backed up with documented proof, found that a certain brand and dosage of Resveratrol sucessfully treats any diseases including Cancer in humans?" But finally before I decide, I am going to contact Bill Sardi myself at Longevinex and get some answers to some peoples negativity toward Longevinex and then I will try to have those answers "double Checked" for accuracy before I make a Longevinex purchase. Of course, I will post my findings here with a post to hopefully help the next person(s) out who are maybe "on the fence" about Longevinex. Maybe it's all BS but I am going to try and find out!



#28 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:51 AM

Don't listen to them Kismet, I hate when people say "search the threads". We know we are able to search the threads, you guys can keep your mouths shut. If you don't want to answer, don't answer. I'm sure someone who doesn't think they're too cool would be more than happy to answer some repeat info. Some people like to have pertient information in the actual thread they're using, and don't want to go reading through other threads.

Cheers
Crep

What do you people take IP-6 for? And how much? Why should there be a risk of iron deficiency (i.e. 1mg of IP-6 chelates x mg iron?).

Search for IP6 in the Supplements section of the forum where it has been discussed.

Damn, but searching is so tedious.  :) It's just that there seem to be many misconceptions about IP-6. I hoped we could educate some who may be taking IP-6 for the wrong reasons. Maybe that's not the right thread anyway, so nevermind. 

joe57777, paragraphs please.



#29 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:55 AM

Marco, IMPORTANT. Before giving it to your wife, read the entire breast cancer caused by resveratrol thread. If I were you, I wouldn't allow your wife to take it, but read and decide for yourself.

Cheers
Crep

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#30 Crepulance

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:57 AM

If you're going to try Longevinex for a month, I would try it for at least 4 months. That is how long I took it before I was able to notice fairly incredible results, such as my eyesight getting better by 50%


Crep

From Joe's post: But finally before I decide, I am going to contact Bill Sardi myself at Longevinex and get some answers to some peoples negativity toward Longevinex and then I will try to have those answers "double Checked" for accuracy before I make a Longevinex purchase. Of course, I will post my findings here with a post to hopefully help the next person(s) out who are maybe "on the fence" about Longevinex. Maybe it's all BS but I am going to try and find out!






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