• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo

Are there careers in life extension research that don't require an


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ MITOMOUSE has been fully funded!

#1 cyborgdreamer

  • Guest
  • 735 posts
  • 204
  • Location:In the wrong universe

Posted 01 October 2009 - 03:24 AM


Okay, so I graduated college with a BA in computer science and I'm now starting a PhD program in computational biology. I enjoy computer programming, I'm interested in biology, and I'm committed toward pursuing a career that works toward extending the human lifespan. The problem is that the long hours and high pressure environment in grad school are KILLING MY SOUL! Maybe I just need to give it more time but, as of right now, I wake up exhausted/sleep-deprived and spend the whole day waiting for my work to be over. By the time I actually finish, I'm too drained to do anything but plop myself in front of the TV, praying that I somehow manage to get enough rest before it starts all over again.

So my question is, do I have any other options? Is there any way I could drop my degree and do life extension research in a low-pressure, 9:00-5:00 setting?

Edited by cyborgdreamer, 01 October 2009 - 03:27 AM.

  • like x 1

#2 cyborgdreamer

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 735 posts
  • 204
  • Location:In the wrong universe

Posted 01 October 2009 - 03:27 AM

Oops, the title got cut off. I was supposed to say: 'Are there careers in life extension research that don't require an advanced degree?'

#3 niner

  • Guest
  • 16,276 posts
  • 2,000
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 01 October 2009 - 03:54 AM

Okay, so I graduated college with a BA in computer science and I'm now starting a PhD program in computational biology. I enjoy computer programming, I'm interested in biology, and I'm committed toward pursuing a career that works toward extending the human lifespan. The problem is that the long hours and high pressure environment in grad school are KILLING MY SOUL! Maybe I just need to give it more time but, as of right now, I wake up exhausted/sleep-deprived and spend the whole day waiting for my work to be over. By the time I actually finish, I'm too drained to do anything but plop myself in front of the TV, praying that I somehow manage to get enough rest before it starts all over again.

So my question is, do I have any other options? Is there any way I could drop my degree and do life extension research in a low-pressure, 9:00-5:00 setting?

What's happening now in grad school? Is is all coursework? The usual scenario is that the first year or so is pretty intense while you learn all the stuff you should have learned in undergrad plus some more stuff. It might get better with time. On the other hand, if the intensity is due to factors that don't look like they are going to change, then maybe it would be a good idea to consider something else. If you have enough familiarity with lab work, you could probably be a tech in a lab. I'm not sure that would be a good long term plan, though.

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Advertisements help to support the work of this non-profit organisation. [] To go ad-free join as a Member.

#4 lunarsolarpower

  • Guest
  • 1,322 posts
  • 54
  • Location:BC, Canada

Posted 01 October 2009 - 04:36 AM

Biology research assistants generally make $11-15 per hour I think. Usually they have a BS or MS in a related field but I wouldn't think it would be strictly required since most of the learning is on the job. Not a great long-term career financially of course. I don't know about the different types of graduate school but most professional schools are 110% effort 110% of the time it seems. One exception I remember hearing about was a guy going to UCLA law school who went to class 3 days a week and played video games the rest of the week. That was during his first year though so who knows how it turned out. Many of the graduate programs I have heard about are worse because of the humiliating attitudes of those in charge than because of the significant work load.

There are so many other ways to make a difference than just by earning degrees. I feel like being in school serves to narrow the range of possibilities one is able to see open to them. It's a whole wide world out there and much of it is waiting to be explored, invented, discovered and created.

When evaluating your position and options consider your talents, your goals, your present position, how what you're doing will impact those and don't forget to consider the business principle of sunk costs if you think you may be heading down the wrong road.

#5 John Schloendorn

  • Guest, Advisor, Guardian
  • 2,542 posts
  • 156
  • Location:Mountain View, CA

Posted 06 October 2009 - 09:16 PM

It will get better when you are in a position that allows you to think that you're actually making a difference in life-extension. I rather strongly suspect that if you start thinking that you will no longer want a 9-5 job, but will want to work on it all the time. Now, do you think your grad school is your best way to make a real difference? If yes, then you'll get your emotions in line with your goals in time. If no, then what are you doing there anyway ;-)

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Advertisements help to support the work of this non-profit organisation. [] To go ad-free join as a Member.

#6 John Schloendorn

  • Guest, Advisor, Guardian
  • 2,542 posts
  • 156
  • Location:Mountain View, CA

Posted 06 October 2009 - 09:17 PM

Heh. Thanks for suffering to save everybody's life.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users