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Vitamin E


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11 replies to this topic

Poll: tocotrienols (35 member(s) have cast votes)

tocotrienols

  1. yes (25 votes [71.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 71.43%

  2. no (10 votes [28.57%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.57%

Vote

#1 ajnast4r

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 01:16 AM


tocotrienols

#2 ajnast4r

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 02:02 AM

my suggestion is a small amount, <10mg of a branded palm tocotrienol complex

Edited by ajnast4r, 29 October 2009 - 02:19 AM.


#3 Blue

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 08:43 AM

Not an essential nutrient or even a normal part of most diets. If we include this, then where do we draw the line? There are hundreds of non-essential supplements sold. Also expensive with very few human studies.

#4 ajnast4r

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 05:40 PM

Not an essential nutrient or even a normal part of most diets. If we include this, then where do we draw the line? There are hundreds of non-essential supplements sold. Also expensive with very few human studies.



trace amounts are found in most diets, hence the low dose suggestion


http://en.wikipedia....iki/Tocotrienol

Tocotrienols are found in high concentrations in rice bran.[10] Other natural tocotrienol sources include coconut oil, cocoa butter, barley and wheat germ



#5 Mind

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Posted 29 October 2009 - 05:47 PM

Not an essential nutrient or even a normal part of most diets. If we include this, then where do we draw the line? There are hundreds of non-essential supplements sold. Also expensive with very few human studies.


Vitamin E is not an essential nutrient?

#6 ajnast4r

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 10:36 PM

Vitamin E is not an essential nutrient?


the body only has specific transport mechanisms for alpha tocopherol... so TECHINCALLY only alpha-toc is essential. but clearly they work synergistically

Edited by ajnast4r, 31 October 2009 - 10:41 PM.


#7 Pike

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 01:05 PM

afiak, tocopherols inhibited tocotrienols. can't remember if they inhibit absorption or direct function, but it's posted up here somewhere.

#8 maxwatt

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 12:20 AM

The last time I looked into it, the only studies that showed benefits to tocotrienols were sponsored by the manufacturer of same. Maybe there is more data now showing a positive effect? If not, ditch them. I believe they are basically tocotrienols with unsaturated side-chains.

#9 Pike

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 12:39 AM

i'm going to be voting no for the simple reason that i believe our multi will do fine in the e-vitamin department with a good mixed-tocopherol composition

that, and i can only imagine tocotrienols would hike up the price quite a bit

Edited by Pike, 04 November 2009 - 12:40 AM.


#10 shazam

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 05:30 AM

i'm going to be voting no for the simple reason that i believe our multi will do fine in the e-vitamin department with a good mixed-tocopherol composition

that, and i can only imagine tocotrienols would hike up the price quite a bit


You know, he's got a point. If I wanna get them, I'll just get Tocosorb. And you know what? The tocopherols will compete for absorption ANYWAY, so it's kinda pointless expense.

On the other hand, you could instead include trienols ONLY, and maybe a little alpha toco. Yeah yeah yeah, not tested, all that tripe, but still, the studies are indicating that trienols have more benefits than the pherols, though I'm not entirely sure if they also do what the pherols do.

For now though, my vote is no. Jarrow probably did it about 3 times better than you could without racking up crazy expense anyway, no offense. Plus you'll please the paranoid "BUT IT HASNT BEEN DONE YET" crowd.

#11 2tender

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 12:08 AM

They work well for hair, skin and hormonal balance, probably more effective than pherols. The powder is less problematic than softgels, some people have problems digesting the oils. A jar containing 36 gms of powder can last for months using a low dose regimen of 30 to 50 mgs daily. JMO

#12 Athanasios

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 06:41 AM

The last time I looked into it, the only studies that showed benefits to tocotrienols were sponsored by the manufacturer of same. Maybe there is more data now showing a positive effect? If not, ditch them. I believe they are basically tocotrienols with unsaturated side-chains.

I think the research on red palm oil is what has sparked interest.

Edited by cnorwood, 15 February 2010 - 06:44 AM.





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