• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Ashwagandha


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 mentatpsi

  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 03 February 2010 - 09:53 PM


So for awhile now I've felt my focus levels diminish and my actions following a sort of flow which is not self-induced (almost as if I react more than use my own will). I've been experimenting with a great deal of herbs and supplements to remove this, and though I've had success I stumbled upon something greater. I decided to begin Ashwagandha supplementation regularly the moment I read a particular fact about its mechanism of action:

"The drug-induced increase in cortical muscarinic acetylcholine receptor capacity might partly explain the cognition-enhancing and memory-improving effects of WS extracts in animals and in humans."

.

Now I've taken it several times, noticed the enhancement of focus almost to the extent of being an antithesis to Piracetam. I feel readily capable of handling the influx of information involving communication and academia. It is also important to note I'm taking it in conjunction to other supplements and that it is most amplified by Coffee.

#2 Chaos Theory

  • Guest
  • 272 posts
  • 23
  • Location:United States

Posted 04 February 2010 - 09:09 PM

I'm a fan of ashwagandha. I use 225mg of the sensoril brand before bed. I mostly notice better sleep quality and as a result better mood and less stress.

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for BRAIN HEALTH to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 mentatpsi

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 04 February 2010 - 09:58 PM

I'm a fan of ashwagandha. I use 225mg of the sensoril brand before bed. I mostly notice better sleep quality and as a result better mood and less stress.


Ya there are definitely anti-anxiety benefits to aswagandha. I find the muscaranic activity rather interesting. I'm not sure exactly the mechanism by which it exerts this effect, but it seems to focus me while not disabling me from exploring other thought streams.

I'm imagining the sensoril brand is standardized? Have you noticed anything else other than emotional benefits?

#4 mentatpsi

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 04 February 2010 - 10:00 PM

"The compounds slightly enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the lateral septum and globus pallidus, and decreased AChE activity in the vertical diagonal band. These changes were accompanied by enhanced M1-muscarinic-cholinergic receptor-binding in lateral and medial septum as well as in frontal cortices, whereas the M2-muscarinic receptor-binding sites were increased in a number of cortical regions including cingulate, frontal, piriform, parietal, and retrospinal cortex. The data suggest the compounds preferentially affect events in the cortical and basal forebrain cholinergic-signal-transduction cascade."[2]


the information is from my blog, but I've the research links if anyone is interested.

#5 mentatpsi

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 05 February 2010 - 04:27 AM

"Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 microM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 micromol kg(-1) day(-1), for 13 days, p.o.) recovered A beta(25-35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks."[3]


Edited by mentatpsi, 05 February 2010 - 04:28 AM.


#6 Shay

  • Guest
  • 54 posts
  • 6

Posted 05 February 2010 - 05:18 PM

"Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 microM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 micromol kg(-1) day(-1), for 13 days, p.o.) recovered A beta(25-35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks."[3]


These are exciting claims! My mother has had a series of strokes that have left her somewhat impaired, perhaps ashwagandha can help her.

#7 medicineman

  • Guest
  • 750 posts
  • 126
  • Location:Kuwait

Posted 05 February 2010 - 05:55 PM

"Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 microM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 micromol kg(-1) day(-1), for 13 days, p.o.) recovered A beta(25-35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks."[3]


These are exciting claims! My mother has had a series of strokes that have left her somewhat impaired, perhaps ashwagandha can help her.


if she is on anti-thrombotic drugs such as warfarin, while I am not aware of any issues, you should consult an expert :)

#8 mentatpsi

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 05 February 2010 - 10:14 PM

"Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 microM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 micromol kg(-1) day(-1), for 13 days, p.o.) recovered A beta(25-35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks."[3]


These are exciting claims! My mother has had a series of strokes that have left her somewhat impaired, perhaps ashwagandha can help her.


if she is on anti-thrombotic drugs such as warfarin, while I am not aware of any issues, you should consult an expert :)


Excellent point.

This website [Univera science - Nutrients Ingredients/Interactions] should provide information regarding interaction. Just click on the Continue button and it should open a new window. Ashwagandha is in the database. Hope that helps.

#9 cougar

  • Guest
  • 114 posts
  • -6
  • Location:Canada

Posted 06 February 2010 - 04:17 AM

"Subsequent treatment with WL-A (1 microM) induced significant regeneration of both axons and dendrites, in addition to the reconstruction of pre- and postsynapses in the neurons. WL-A (10 micromol kg(-1) day(-1), for 13 days, p.o.) recovered A beta(25-35)-induced memory deficit in mice. At that time, the decline of axons, dendrites, and synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was almost recovered. WL-A is therefore an important candidate for the therapeutic treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as it is able to reconstruct neuronal networks."[3]


These are exciting claims! My mother has had a series of strokes that have left her somewhat impaired, perhaps ashwagandha can help her.


if she is on anti-thrombotic drugs such as warfarin, while I am not aware of any issues, you should consult an expert :)


Excellent point.

This website [Univera science - Nutrients Ingredients/Interactions] should provide information regarding interaction. Just click on the Continue button and it should open a new window. Ashwagandha is in the database. Hope that helps.

Excellent site. Thank you so much.
By the way, I couldn't find warfarin interaction in this database.

#10 Dorho

  • Guest
  • 354 posts
  • 56

Posted 06 February 2010 - 10:22 AM

Is there scientific evidence regarding the superiority of some specific Ashwagandha extract over others? I'm interested in thought clarification, myelinization as well as anti-anxiety effects preferably without excess sedation.

#11 Chaos Theory

  • Guest
  • 272 posts
  • 23
  • Location:United States

Posted 07 February 2010 - 05:24 PM

I'm imagining the sensoril brand is standardized? Have you noticed anything else other than emotional benefits?


As far as I know, Sensoril is the highest potency extract out there. They have some studies posted on their website.

http://www.sensoril....nt...oril®.html

I've mentioned this before on here. Sensoril recommends 250mg/day, which is the dose used in all of their studies. The jarrow sensoril is 225mg which is probably close enough for similar results. My personal experience, 450mg(2 capsules) at bedtime seems to put me into a very deep sleep, which I have found makes it somewhat difficult to wake the following day. On the upside, I find the 450mg dose to also provide an anxiolytic effect throughout the following day. However, due to the fact that it makes waking up more difficult for me, and the fact that ashwagandha supposedly lowers cortisol, I decided to play it safe and only take one capsule, 225mg at bedtime. I feel it still enhances sleep quality a bit but does not make me prone to hitting the snooze button on my alarm every day. If a company came out with a ~300mg sensoril pill at a reasonable price I might opt for that.

Edited by Chaos Theory, 07 February 2010 - 05:24 PM.


#12 mentatpsi

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 07 February 2010 - 06:01 PM

Yes, the 8%. I bought a brand, LEF, for the same quantity, as was suggested by the Sensoril Study. My intent is to try the same approach, if it has too much of a sedative property I shall take the LEF brand at night, and a lower potency brand during the day.

Thank you very much for the links to the studies, interesting reads.

Edited by mentatpsi, 07 February 2010 - 06:02 PM.


#13 Dorho

  • Guest
  • 354 posts
  • 56

Posted 07 February 2010 - 07:21 PM

Thanks for the info, I think I'll try Sensoril.

#14 JLL

  • Guest
  • 2,192 posts
  • 161

Posted 12 February 2010 - 01:43 PM

Here's my review of all the studies I could find on ashwagandha as a potential nootropic. Seems pretty good.

#15 mentatpsi

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 904 posts
  • 36
  • Location:Philadelphia, USA

Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:32 PM

After trying it for awhile, I'm beginning to think it is better used as a repair herb for short term use. My reasoning is that it at times provides too much of a sedation, even when taking it at night. In addition to the increase in sleep needs, I have also found it sometimes slowing my thought flow and although this can be benfiicial when the moment desires it, at times of brainstorming it can reduce coverage of where thoughts flow.

I am certain some people will benefit from this herb more than others, and that this beneficial property is based on where the individual hopes the nootropics shall take him. I myself value highly dynamic creativity.

For now, I'm going to go back to Bacopa.

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for BRAIN HEALTH to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#16 Thorsten3

  • Guest
  • 1,121 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Bristol UK
  • NO

Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:51 PM

Yes, the 8%. I bought a brand, LEF, for the same quantity, as was suggested by the Sensoril Study. My intent is to try the same approach, if it has too much of a sedative property I shall take the LEF brand at night, and a lower potency brand during the day.

Thank you very much for the links to the studies, interesting reads.


Is it just me or is Ash quite a weak supplement (or very subtle)?? I don't notice anything from it really. Bacopa, rhodiola, Gotu and others are far more noticable in the way they hit your system. The only reason I show any further interest with Ash is because of its supposed anti-anxiety effects. It's just not worth the bother, unless I maybe buy the herb in its raw state?? These caramalized tablets (extract) I have are supposedly high potency but the effects are weaker than a refreshing glass of water for me in how they combat against anxiety. I may just draw a line with this one and forget about it.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users