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NAC Eye Drops


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Poll: NAC Eye Drops (32 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you use NAC eye drops?

  1. No, and I wouldn't even if they were free. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  2. No, I don't think it is worth the cost. (1 votes [3.12%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.12%

  3. No, I haven't really looked into it. (6 votes [18.75%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.75%

  4. No, not yet but I plan to start. (11 votes [34.38%])

    Percentage of vote: 34.38%

  5. No, for some other reason (please state). (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. Yes, I use Can-C eye drops. (6 votes [18.75%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.75%

  7. Yes, I use Brite Eyes eye drops. (5 votes [15.62%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.62%

  8. Yes, I use Vision Clarity eye drops. (1 votes [3.12%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.12%

  9. Yes, I use some other NAC eye drop (please state which). (2 votes [6.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.25%

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#1 gwgaston

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 05:41 AM


I'm really curious to know who is using NAC Eye Drops and which brand you are using? They all seem to be about the same and expensive. Not much NAC in them so I'm guessing we are paying for the novelty and sterility? These are way too expensive for me now. My mom just had cataract surgery and I was looking into eye drops for her. I see various 'Brite Eyes' from the vendors like LEF and Ethos.

#2 Blue

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 06:40 PM

Not sure if there is any reason for the high price except that at least some forms are patented. Looks like all the positive reserach in humans is coming from a Russian team/researcher who also holds a patent.

This independent (but using another commercial product) research in dogs looks not all that promsing for curing, but maybe for stopping progress, even considering that this formulation contains several other possible active substances:
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/16939459

Edited by Blue, 07 February 2010 - 06:51 PM.

  • Informative x 1

#3 e Volution

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 01:12 AM

Interesting timing as I am also going through the same issue with parental cataracts and researching eye health, so also very interested in the NAC eye drops (just ordered LEFs Lutein & Zeaxanthin eye care supplement)

I just got an email from my mother regarding cataracts and laser surgery which I found very interesting, and might help any of you guys who are going through this with the oldies (or will likely go through in the future):

A year ago he [my dad] had one eye lasered, where the lens is reshaped by the laser to correct your vision. The other eye has formed a cataract - the lens becomes cloudy and is replaced with a plastic lens that is clear (obviously) but also shaped to give you correct vision. To do this they scan your eyeball to work out what degree of curve and thickness the new lens has to have. So far so good, but now they discovered a cataract forming in the eye that has had the lens lasered and the problem is that once a lens has been lasered they can't scan it to work out dimensions for a new lens. They said they are working on a logarithm for this purpose but it is not available yet

^Very interesting regarding the logarithm (did she mean algorithm?). I know nothing about laser eye surgery but perhaps its worth being conscious of its negative effects on potential future cataract surgery.

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#4 Marios Kyriazis

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 03:48 PM

A great deal of research on NAC eye drops was performed by only one team of Russian researchers, lead by Mark Babyzhayev. He is the patent holder for the Can-C brand. Apparently the Bright Eyes brand that contains also vitamins in the preparation can destabilize the action of acetyl-carnosine in the eye. The thing I find astonishing is that, despite his continuing positive research (mostly published in peer-review journals), there is little other research either to support or refute the claims. I would have thought that there would be much more interest in this compound.
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#5 gwgaston

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 06:21 PM

The solution used in the canine study that Blue linked to has other things such as 'a buffered vehicle containing the antioxidants glutathione, cysteine ascorbate, L-taurine and riboflavin'... and twice as much NAC... but the popular commercial solutions I have found seem to vary little outside of possibly one of the lubricant and amount of it used.


Can-C
---------------------------------------------------
Active ingredients: Glycerine (lubricant) 1%, Carboxymethylcellulose sodium (lubricant) 0.3%.
Inactive ingredients: Sterile Water (ophthalmic grade solution pH 6.3 to 6.5).
Antioxidants: N-Acetyl-Carnosine (NAC)* 1%.
Buffers: Borate, Potassium Bicarbonate.
Preservative: Purified Benzyl Alcohol.



Life Extension Brite Eyes III
---------------------------------------------------
N-acetyl-carnosine 1.0%
Glycerin (lubricant) 1.0%
Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (lubricant) 0.03%

Also contains: boric acid, citric acid, potassium bicarbonate, purified benzyl alcohol, and sterile water.




Vision Clarity
---------------------------------------------------
Pharmaceutical Grade Ingredients:
N-acetylcarnosine (NAC) 1.0%
Glycerin (lubricant) 1.0%
Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (lubricant) 0.15%
Sterile water (ophthalmic grade isotonic solution, pH 6.3 to 6.4)
Buffered with boric acid, citric acid, and potassium bicarbonate, and, as a preservative, purified benzyl alcohol.

#6 kismet

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 06:39 PM

I would have thought that there would be much more interest in this compound.

Nah, that makes no sense. Why would someone pay huge sums of money to study someone's else compound? It (usually) doesn't happen with pharma, it won't (probably) happen here. Although, sometimes the NIH or similar organisations fund studies FWIW.

You can expect independent animal research, because it's cheap... e.g.:

Mol Vis. 2008;14:2282-91. Epub 2008 Dec 11.
Effect of carnosine, aminoguanidine, and aspirin drops on the prevention of cataracts in diabetic rats. Yan et al.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....21/?tool=pubmed

Mol Vis. 2009 Oct 21;15:2129-38.
Effect of a combination of carnosine and aspirin eye drops on streptozotocin -- induced diabetic cataract in rats. Shi Q, Yan H, Li MY, Harding JJ.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC2773744/

and if anyone could send me the following, I'd appreciate it:
J Drug Target. 2009 Jan;17(1):36-63.
N-Acetylcarnosine and histidyl-hydrazide are potent agents for multitargeted ophthalmic therapy of senile cataracts and diabetic ocular complications.
Babizhayev MA, Guiotto A, Kasus-Jacobi A.
"...The ophthalmic drug N-acetylcarnosine eye drop formulation with sustained time- release and increased absorption of L-carnosine in the aqueous humor (a prolonged effective dose) showed follow-up treatment efficacy for age-related cataracts for enrolled patients into the randomized double blind placebo controlled crossover clinical trial [is this a new trial, the extension of the trials published in Rejuv. Res. or just re-reporting the same? Inquiring minds want to know...], and in over 50250 various cohort patients [?!], was demonstrated to have an efficacy, safety and good tolerability for prevention and treatment of visual impairment in the older population data base. "

Edited by kismet, 08 February 2010 - 06:41 PM.


#7 Marios Kyriazis

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 07:15 PM

and if anyone could send me the following, I'd appreciate it:
J Drug Target. 2009 Jan;17(1):36-63.
N-Acetylcarnosine and histidyl-hydrazide are potent agents for multitargeted ophthalmic therapy of senile cataracts and diabetic ocular complications.
Babizhayev MA, Guiotto A, Kasus-Jacobi A.
"...The ophthalmic drug N-acetylcarnosine eye drop formulation with sustained time- release and increased absorption of L-carnosine in the aqueous humor (a prolonged effective dose) showed follow-up treatment efficacy for age-related cataracts for enrolled patients into the randomized double blind placebo controlled crossover clinical trial [is this a new trial, the extension of the trials published in Rejuv. Res. or just re-reporting the same? Inquiring minds want to know...], and in over 50250 various cohort patients [?!], was demonstrated to have an efficacy, safety and good tolerability for prevention and treatment of visual impairment in the older population data base. "
[/quote]



He only did one follow up double-blind study with around 70 patients, can't remember the exact number. It is the same study, reported in different publications!
As for the 50250 'cohort patients', this is the estimated total number of patients who have used Can-C since its launch. They just did an analysis of the side effects reported and the pattern of re-ordering, which shows -in their opinion- the degree of satisfaction by the client

#8 platypus

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 10:17 AM

The solution used in the canine study that Blue linked to has other things such as 'a buffered vehicle containing the antioxidants glutathione, cysteine ascorbate, L-taurine and riboflavin'... and twice as much NAC... but the popular commercial solutions I have found seem to vary little outside of possibly one of the lubricant and amount of it used.


Can-C
---------------------------------------------------
Active ingredients: Glycerine (lubricant) 1%, Carboxymethylcellulose sodium (lubricant) 0.3%.
Inactive ingredients: Sterile Water (ophthalmic grade solution pH 6.3 to 6.5).
Antioxidants: N-Acetyl-Carnosine (NAC)* 1%.
Buffers: Borate, Potassium Bicarbonate.
Preservative: Purified Benzyl Alcohol.

Life Extension Brite Eyes III
---------------------------------------------------
N-acetyl-carnosine 1.0%
Glycerin (lubricant) 1.0%
Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (lubricant) 0.03%

Also contains: boric acid, citric acid, potassium bicarbonate, purified benzyl alcohol, and sterile water.

Where did you find the ingredient-list for Brite-Eyes? It seems that they are equivalent to Can-C eyedrops for which there seem to be quite a bit of hype for cataract reversal. Are there testimonials about Brite Eyes III where people claim it cured their cataracts, reduced floaters & presbyopia etc.?

#9 tomnook

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 05:01 PM

I've used Relentless Improvement's "Carnosine Eye Drops (w/ 1% N-Acetyl-L-Carnosine)" for the past three or four years. Four months "on" and eight months "off" - one drop in each eye a.m. and before bed. I've nothing but good things to say about them. I had lasik in both eyes ten years ago and noticed my nighttime vision deteriorating five or six years post surgery. I also supplement daily with the generally recommended vitamins : zeaxanthin, astaxanthin, lutein, bilberry so it may be one of those which has made the difference. A recent eye check up confirmed that there had been no deterioration in my vision since the surgery ten years ago. I'm genetically predisposed to macular degeneration hence my attention to eye care.

I also used the drops to help my elderly dog's vision and witnessed "cataracts" almost "disappear" in what seemed to be weeks - again, one drop am and pm with four months on and eight months off.

I'm 56 btw :)


Edited by tomnook, 27 January 2011 - 05:05 PM.

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#10 Marios Kyriazis

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 06:40 PM

Eight months off seems a long time, I would have advised 2-3 months. Why did you decide to leave the treatment off for so long?

The cataract almost disappearing is the 'snow melting effect' which was described quite clearly by researchers.

#11 tomnook

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Posted 27 January 2011 - 07:44 PM

The cost of lengthier application coupled with the fact that I didn't actually notice any deterioration in my eyesight between treatments. The original lasik treament which I received was somewhat of a disaster with one of my eyes suffering a "partial flap" and as a consequence resulting in significant scar tissue in the line of sight. This scar tissue seems to have disappeared since using the caronsine drops and I no longer notice a blur.

Interesting, yes, "snow melting effect" is a good description.

#12 maxwatt

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 11:47 AM

The LEF product did nothing for my 13 yr-old dog and I gave up after a year. She is now pretty much blind, I'm her seeing-eye human. I have to mind she does not bump into things when I walk her.

I started the drops as soon as she began developing cataracts, but they continued to progress.

#13 tomnook

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 04:41 PM

The LEF product did nothing for my 13 yr-old dog and I gave up after a year. She is now pretty much blind, I'm her seeing-eye human. I have to mind she does not bump into things when I walk her.

I started the drops as soon as she began developing cataracts, but they continued to progress.


Of course the tricky part is getting your dog to keep it's eye open for 30 seconds after applying the drops :unsure:

#14 Juicy

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 10:58 PM

Canine study? Mind to link me to this product or ingredient.

 

The solution used in the canine study that Blue linked to has other things such as 'a buffered vehicle containing the antioxidants glutathione, cysteine ascorbate, L-taurine and riboflavin'... and twice as much NAC... but the popular commercial solutions I have found seem to vary little outside of possibly one of the lubricant and amount of it used.


Can-C
---------------------------------------------------
Active ingredients: Glycerine (lubricant) 1%, Carboxymethylcellulose sodium (lubricant) 0.3%.
Inactive ingredients: Sterile Water (ophthalmic grade solution pH 6.3 to 6.5).
Antioxidants: N-Acetyl-Carnosine (NAC)* 1%.
Buffers: Borate, Potassium Bicarbonate.
Preservative: Purified Benzyl Alcohol.



Life Extension Brite Eyes III
---------------------------------------------------
N-acetyl-carnosine 1.0%
Glycerin (lubricant) 1.0%
Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (lubricant) 0.03%

Also contains: boric acid, citric acid, potassium bicarbonate, purified benzyl alcohol, and sterile water.




Vision Clarity
---------------------------------------------------
Pharmaceutical Grade Ingredients:
N-acetylcarnosine (NAC) 1.0%
Glycerin (lubricant) 1.0%
Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (lubricant) 0.15%
Sterile water (ophthalmic grade isotonic solution, pH 6.3 to 6.4)
Buffered with boric acid, citric acid, and potassium bicarbonate, and, as a preservative, purified benzyl alcohol.

 



#15 albedo

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Posted 31 December 2015 - 12:33 PM

More experience with CAN-C? Or Bright Eyes III?

 

There was never a reply to Platypus's question about composition of Bright Eyes III. I assume CAN-C might be the best try as from the original inventor holding the patent (Babizhayev).

 

Please keep this and other thread on eyes health living: it is so important!

 

I would like to give a try and ask my doctor for follow up. The typical setting with an ophthalmologist is they see a cataract starting (my case !!) and see you one year after saying “it is now time to surgery”. Unfortunately, I also have an increased genetic risk for exfoliation glaucoma and would like to avoid a cataract surgery. I am supplementing already with everything I know to be potentially beneficial (L-Carnosine, Bilberry, R-ALA, SODzyme, GliSODin, Resveratrol in particular ...). I am experimenting with low doses metformin but that is another approach (it looks like R-ALA is beneficial independently from its lowering glucose effect *).

 

* Efficacy of a-Lipoic Acid Against Diabetic Cataract in Rat

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17295134



#16 albedo

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 08:36 AM

There is also recent information on CAN-C and results here: http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=756736



#17 mikey

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 02:05 AM

There is also recent information on CAN-C and results here: http://www.longecity...ndpost&p=756736

 

I posted that. Here it is in full:

----------------------------------------

My vision was 10/15 until I was 41. Then my vision of things farther away than about 50 feet started to not be as clear.

 

After another year or so my close vision was less than perfect.

 

I have progressive lens eyeglasses. Although I could read the paper without glasses, I would use the lower part of my eyeglasses to read the paper so that it would be crystal clear.

 

I tried n-acetyl-carnosine eye drops, as Can-C, because someone that has great credibility said that they had improved his vision significantly.

 

Well, the first time I used them I sat down to read the paper and the print was crystal clear without my glasses.

 

This was amazing, so I had my yearly eye test a couple months early.

 

The doctor said that my vision was 0.25 better in every area and my astigmatism was almost gone.

 

I had to buy new glasses.

 

Then about 10 months later I sensed that my glasses weren't giving me crystal clear vision, so I went in for another eye test.

 

Again, the doctor said that my eyes had improved 0.25 in every measure. But my astigmatism got  a bit worse, but it wasn't as bad as it was before.

 

Can-C is a brand that costs about $38, discounted on Amazon, the lowest price I've seen.

 

Relentless Improvement makes the same eye drops for $21.99 on Amazon.

 

I continue to put a drop or two in each eye every day - of the product by Relentless Improvement.


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#18 albedo

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 07:16 AM

Thank you Mikey for reactivating this thread. I am still searching a good source of NAC eye drops and still waiting for more posts on experience with CAN-C, Bright Eyes III (assuming the composition is the one reported here (w/ 1% NAC) as LEF is not disclosing it) Relentless Improvement (same) or others. Please note that when you click on the amazon link you gave for CAN-C you are routed to the Epitalon thread.



#19 aconita

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 11:47 AM

A bit off topic but castor oil seems to do the same if not better than NAC eye drops, at a fraction of the price, of course.

 

 

 

 



#20 albedo

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Posted 11 January 2016 - 01:55 PM

I have never heard about castor oil for cataracts. Maybe as a lubricant for dry eyes hence reducing the inflammation which might contribute to the disease? A small search seems find it as folk remedy in several cultures though. At least NAC is supported by few studies as below. Interesting nevertheless, thank you for sharing and if you have good pointers please let us know.

 

N-Acetylcarnosine, a natural histidine-containing dipeptide, as a potent ophthalmic drug in treatment of human cataracts

http://www.sciencedi...196978101004077

 

Efficacy of N-Acetylcarnosine in the Treatment of Cataracts

http://link.springer...20-00004#page-1

 

 

 

 I had not heard this before but it makes some sense.  Castor oil is used as a lubricant for dry eyes.  Dry eyes in particular can lead to inflammation, which can contribute to cataracts.

Looking in to it I could not find any actual studies, but apparently this is an old remedy used in various parts of the world.  But I also read that it can take about 3 months.

It is safe and is worth a try.  The only natural thing I have ever seen for cataracts is a dusty miller extract, which is also an old pharmaceutical preparation for eye drops in the treatment of cataracts.  But this has to be used very cautiously since it is caustic.  So the castor oil sounds like a much better alternative.

If glaucoma, which can also contribute to cataracts, is present then coleus forskohlii and vitamin C sources are recommended to drop the intraocular pressure.  Coleus forskohlii will work orally, but again works best for cataracts as eye drops.



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#21 Logic

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 01:27 PM

Lanosterol reverses protein aggregation in cataracts

http://www.nature.co...ature14650.html

 


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