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Resveratrol: Current State of Science?


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#1 Psych

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 04:09 PM


There's so much hype, capitalist-driven marketing, and apparently equivocal studies demonstrating usefulness of resveratrol. Is it worth to continue taking it and why?

#2 2tender

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 05:04 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.

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#3 Psych

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 05:39 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.



I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!

#4 2tender

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 05:56 PM

If the formula youre taking, is not the one Im taking, then I would switch brands, take it for a month and see how you feel. If its good, continue, if not, dont. I have found some supplements are not equal to others. Fillers, binders, excipients, capsule type, even batch of actual ingredient can all cause side effects such as the one you describe. Common sense, if its giving you untolerable side effects or not doing what you think it should do after a reasonable period of time, then stop using it. JMO

#5 niner

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 06:24 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.

I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!

The benefits of resveratrol may or may not be apparent in the short term. There are a lot of compounds that are health-promoting, yet you can't "feel" them. Just as an example, if you get out of bed tomorrow and you don't have a heart attack, what does it feel like? People with inflammatory conditions may notice resveratrol in the short term, and you might notice it if you are engaged in endurance exercise training. It's possible that you are in fact having a bad reaction either to resveratrol or some other component in the product you are taking. Is it high purity? (98+%)

#6 Psych

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 06:41 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.

I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!

The benefits of resveratrol may or may not be apparent in the short term. There are a lot of compounds that are health-promoting, yet you can't "feel" them. Just as an example, if you get out of bed tomorrow and you don't have a heart attack, what does it feel like? People with inflammatory conditions may notice resveratrol in the short term, and you might notice it if you are engaged in endurance exercise training. It's possible that you are in fact having a bad reaction either to resveratrol or some other component in the product you are taking. Is it high purity? (98+%)


I've been taking Nitro 250. In your opinion, what's the liklihood that my overall health will improve should I continue to invest in and consume this product (or any comparable formulation)?

#7 eason

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 07:20 PM

I don't think you should really rely on one thing to change your health. Health is so complex that you need to make sure you have all your bases covered. Nitro 250 seems like a good product, but I'm not sure I'd take it every day. With the increased bioavailability, it might be too much resveratrol. We still don't know the ideal amount of resveratrol for humans, but my opinion would be to space it out more so that you're not getting too much.

#8 niner

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 07:25 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.

I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!

The benefits of resveratrol may or may not be apparent in the short term. There are a lot of compounds that are health-promoting, yet you can't "feel" them. Just as an example, if you get out of bed tomorrow and you don't have a heart attack, what does it feel like? People with inflammatory conditions may notice resveratrol in the short term, and you might notice it if you are engaged in endurance exercise training. It's possible that you are in fact having a bad reaction either to resveratrol or some other component in the product you are taking. Is it high purity? (98+%)

I've been taking Nitro 250. In your opinion, what's the liklihood that my overall health will improve should I continue to invest in and consume this product (or any comparable formulation)?

That's a great product, but it isn't cheap. What might you do with the money if you deployed it elsewhere? The effect on your health depends on what your health is like now. If you are overweight and dyslipidemic, or if you have osteoarthritis, or diabetes, then I would continue it. If you're young and healthy, and find yourself scrimping on good food and important supplemental vitamins for lack of money, then I would drop it. If your rash/eczema condition proves to be tied to this formulation, you could either try something else or drop it entirely.

#9 2tender

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 08:00 PM

IMO N250 is the best, however, the emulsion may be the source of your sides. I would switch to one of the micronized powders, exclusively and see if it continues. If it does, then stop or adjust all Resveratrol use.

Edited by 2tender, 21 March 2010 - 08:01 PM.


#10 unglued

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 08:03 PM

Niner's response sounds like wise advice.

As for the current state of the science, on the many other topics in this forum, we've heard about a lot of mouse studies with mixed results. Currently there are 15 human clinical trials registered. The key things to note are
  • The only ones that have been completed so far are Phase I safety studies to show if it has bad side effects, not the ones designed to show that it does any good, which always come later.
  • None of the studies underway are designed to answer the question many of us really wonder about: "If you took two thousand healthy middle-aged people and gave a thousand of them resveratrol and a thousand of them a placebo for several decades, how many of each group would still be alive 40 or 50 years later?" No company wants to fund such a long study, and few of us want to wait that long to find out whether we should kick ourselves for not taking it or for taking it. The closest available studies are looking at "diseases of aging" like diabetes, obesity, cancer, and Alzheimer, in which the effects can be assessed in just a couple of years (and which the FDA recognizes as something they'll approve a drug for if it works).
  • There are only Phase III studies (the final type that the FDA would require before they'd let anyone sell it, if this were not a naturally occurring supplement), both in Alzheimer's. One of which calls itself a pilot study and ends in December 2010. The other ends in June 2011.

So if the standard of evidence you would personally find acceptable is that the FDA approves it as a drug for a disease you don't have, then science may have an answer in a little less than two years. If you need solid evidence that it slows down aging in our species, there are no trials currently planned that would directly answer that question. But those studies are both so small (50 or 60 subjects) and so short (a couple of years) that I'm guessing they'll be inconclusive unless resveratrol has a fairly powerful, obvious effect.

As for side effects, the Phase I studies have each enrolled at most 42 subjects, and even the Phase III studies are small. So if it gives one out of a hundred people a rash, all of the studies would probably miss it entirely (zero subjects affected) or assume it was a coincidence (one subject affected).

Edited by unglued, 21 March 2010 - 08:13 PM.


#11 Psych

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 08:07 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.

I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!

The benefits of resveratrol may or may not be apparent in the short term. There are a lot of compounds that are health-promoting, yet you can't "feel" them. Just as an example, if you get out of bed tomorrow and you don't have a heart attack, what does it feel like? People with inflammatory conditions may notice resveratrol in the short term, and you might notice it if you are engaged in endurance exercise training. It's possible that you are in fact having a bad reaction either to resveratrol or some other component in the product you are taking. Is it high purity? (98+%)

I've been taking Nitro 250. In your opinion, what's the liklihood that my overall health will improve should I continue to invest in and consume this product (or any comparable formulation)?

That's a great product, but it isn't cheap. What might you do with the money if you deployed it elsewhere? The effect on your health depends on what your health is like now. If you are overweight and dyslipidemic, or if you have osteoarthritis, or diabetes, then I would continue it. If you're young and healthy, and find yourself scrimping on good food and important supplemental vitamins for lack of money, then I would drop it. If your rash/eczema condition proves to be tied to this formulation, you could either try something else or drop it entirely.


I'm 50 y.o. in "average" health with no diagnosed health problems.
Do you think other pure formulations of resv (less expensive) will provide similar benefits to that of Nitro 250?

#12 Psych

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 08:24 PM

Niner's response sounds like wise advice.

As for the current state of the science, on the many other topics in this forum, we've heard about a lot of mouse studies with mixed results. Currently there are 15 human clinical trials registered. The key things to note are

  • The only ones that have been completed so far are Phase I safety studies to show if it has bad side effects, not the ones designed to show that it does any good, which always come later.
  • None of the studies underway are designed to answer the question many of us really wonder about: "If you took two thousand healthy middle-aged people and gave a thousand of them resveratrol and a thousand of them a placebo for several decades, how many of each group would still be alive 40 or 50 years later?" No company wants to fund such a long study, and few of us want to wait that long to find out whether we should kick ourselves for not taking it or for taking it. The closest available studies are looking at "diseases of aging" like diabetes, obesity, cancer, and Alzheimer, in which the effects can be assessed in just a couple of years (and which the FDA recognizes as something they'll approve a drug for if it works).
  • There are only Phase III studies (the final type that the FDA would require before they'd let anyone sell it, if this were not a naturally occurring supplement), both in Alzheimer's. One of which calls itself a pilot study and ends in December 2010. The other ends in June 2011.

So if the standard of evidence you would personally find acceptable is that the FDA approves it as a drug for a disease you don't have, then science may have an answer in a little less than two years. If you need solid evidence that it slows down aging in our species, there are no trials currently planned that would directly answer that question. But those studies are both so small (50 or 60 subjects) and so short (a couple of years) that I'm guessing they'll be inconclusive unless resveratrol has a fairly powerful, obvious effect.

As for side effects, the Phase I studies have each enrolled at most 42 subjects, and even the Phase III studies are small. So if it gives one out of a hundred people a rash, all of the studies would probably miss it entirely (zero subjects affected) or assume it was a coincidence (one subject affected).


I highly appreciate your obviously well-informed and professional response. I hope to become more educated about the research and future direction.

#13 Psych

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 09:32 PM

I don't think you should really rely on one thing to change your health. Health is so complex that you need to make sure you have all your bases covered. Nitro 250 seems like a good product, but I'm not sure I'd take it every day. With the increased bioavailability, it might be too much resveratrol. We still don't know the ideal amount of resveratrol for humans, but my opinion would be to space it out more so that you're not getting too much.


These are interesting comments. Perhaps taking 250 mg. every other day maybe more economical and tolerable?

#14 2tender

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 11:22 PM

I think that EOD is still of value. I have used that protocol and still experienced enhanced stamina during exercise. There are other ways you could dose as well 3 days on, 2 off etc. as long as its taken 3 days a week is what I have found to be beneficial at minimum.

#15 eason

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 03:17 AM

These are interesting comments. Perhaps taking 250 mg. every other day maybe more economical and tolerable?


Perhaps I should have asked why you are using the resveratrol.

I assumed that you are looking for the "anti-aging" benefits since you didn't describe any problems in your first post. A few such long-term studies have been conducted in mice, and the doses from those studies were generally low (4.9mg/kg-22mg/kg in MICE). How do these doses translate to humans? We don't know, but the range seems to be somewhere within 50-500mg/day (for life).

On the other hand, if you are looking to acutely improve athletic performance, reduce inflammation, alleviate metabolic syndrome or diabetes symptoms, fight cancer or help improve any other disease state, the optimal dose is higher (likely much higher) (keep in mind that many of these things have limited although promising evidence).

#16 eason

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 03:30 AM

I should have added that 250mg of Nitro is definitely not 250mg of plain resveratrol. You are getting much more bioavailable resveratrol with the Nitro 250.

#17 Psych

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 01:32 AM

I should have added that 250mg of Nitro is definitely not 250mg of plain resveratrol. You are getting much more bioavailable resveratrol with the Nitro 250.


What is this new NitroMX recently advertised by RevGenetics? Is it "better" than Nitro250? I'm now confused.

#18 full_circle

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 02:05 AM

just curious: did anyone on Resveratrol experience internal bleeding? the dosage of Resveratrol talked about here is, i consider, huge. and Resveratrol in that large amount is supposed to thin the blood quite a lot. just curious.

#19 maxwatt

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 10:44 AM

just curious: did anyone on Resveratrol experience internal bleeding? the dosage of Resveratrol talked about here is, i consider, huge. and Resveratrol in that large amount is supposed to thin the blood quite a lot. just curious.

Who wants fat blood? :)

Bleeding has not been reported here. In my experience no such effect was noted. Do you have a reference for this?

#20 2tender

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 01:17 PM

just curious: did anyone on Resveratrol experience internal bleeding? the dosage of Resveratrol talked about here is, i consider, huge. and Resveratrol in that large amount is supposed to thin the blood quite a lot. just curious.


Ive never heard of internal bleeding as a result of use. Did this happen to you? Its widely known that supplement use can thin the blood and surgeons advise stopping all supplements before an operation.

#21 full_circle

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 10:57 AM

i'm surprised that blood thinning property of Resveratrol is not known here.
and to the upper poster: no and i do not take Resveratrol.

Edited by full_circle, 26 March 2010 - 11:00 AM.


#22 mikeinnaples

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:38 PM

i'm surprised that blood thinning property of Resveratrol is not known here.
and to the upper poster: no and i do not take Resveratrol.


Well blood thinning and bleeding are two different animals.

At one point I was taking 2 grams disolved in alcohol and mixing in with lethecin, 3 grams of fish oil, and a baby aspirin every day and didnt so much as experience stool color change from GI bleeding. Given that GI bleeding would be the first thing you would see ....take it as you will.

#23 full_circle

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 01:47 PM

"Well blood thinning and bleeding are two different animals."

i wish our biology were that clearcut.. (and why would resveratrol cause gi bleeding at all? it is brain capillaries that will go 1st and the symptoms of it, it may take years for you to begin to notice, but once you notice it..)

Edited by full_circle, 26 March 2010 - 02:00 PM.


#24 eason

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 06:13 PM

"Well blood thinning and bleeding are two different animals."

i wish our biology were that clearcut.


Biology really is that clearcut.

#25 full_circle

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 06:38 PM

nah

#26 2tender

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 10:58 PM

Actually I think the current state of Science regarding Resveratrol is the same as it has been. More studies than not point to positive effects on general health, provided one is taking the purest available. The fact remains, that, some people cant tolerate it for extended periods of time. Personally, I think it is worth taking, in reasonable amounts, as opposed to not taking it. I draw this conclusion from the standpoint of not using it for weeks at a time, then re-starting. I definately feel a positive difference. I am using the best available purity, pre-emulsified and micronized product available though and in reasonably good health for a young senior citizen.

I see what you're saying. My issue is this: I've used a high quality formula on & off for several months, and noticed no benefits, except less skin irritation (rash or eczema) when not taking it!

The benefits of resveratrol may or may not be apparent in the short term. There are a lot of compounds that are health-promoting, yet you can't "feel" them. Just as an example, if you get out of bed tomorrow and you don't have a heart attack, what does it feel like? People with inflammatory conditions may notice resveratrol in the short term, and you might notice it if you are engaged in endurance exercise training. It's possible that you are in fact having a bad reaction either to resveratrol or some other component in the product you are taking. Is it high purity? (98+%)

I've been taking Nitro 250. In your opinion, what's the liklihood that my overall health will improve should I continue to invest in and consume this product (or any comparable formulation)?

That's a great product, but it isn't cheap. What might you do with the money if you deployed it elsewhere? The effect on your health depends on what your health is like now. If you are overweight and dyslipidemic, or if you have osteoarthritis, or diabetes, then I would continue it. If you're young and healthy, and find yourself scrimping on good food and important supplemental vitamins for lack of money, then I would drop it. If your rash/eczema condition proves to be tied to this formulation, you could either try something else or drop it entirely.


I'm 50 y.o. in "average" health with no diagnosed health problems.
Do you think other pure formulations of resv (less expensive) will provide similar benefits to that of Nitro 250?



It may be worth a try, there are some products from the same provider, that I am considering, there isnt much of a diff. in price. Pure, micronized, is the way to go IMO.

#27 niner

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 02:54 AM

i'm surprised that blood thinning property of Resveratrol is not known here.
and to the upper poster: no and i do not take Resveratrol.

Perhaps it's not known because it doesn't exist? Unless you can provide some evidence for your assertion, I'll have to assume it's not the case. Nothing personal, but here at ImmInst we like new claims to be accompanied by references of some sort.

#28 full_circle

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 03:02 AM

are you saying you yourself still do not know blood thinning property of Resveratrol?

#29 bacopa

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 03:23 AM

on anti-aging compunds, GlaxoSmithKline, and Resveratrol.

http://www.technolog...4966/?nlid=2848

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#30 2tender

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Posted 27 March 2010 - 03:54 AM

on anti-aging compunds, GlaxoSmithKline, and Resveratrol.

http://www.technolog...4966/?nlid=2848



I think the study is a farce, designed to immolate GSK and Sinclair. Pfizer is scrambling to keep up. They know that the future is now, and they dont have the science to compete.




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