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Which universities/programs are focused on longevity research?


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#1 David V

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 07:02 PM


Curious to see if anybody knows:

Which universities or colleges have programs that are specifically focused on longevity research? Have you attended school there? Would you suggest it the school to a friend?

#2 Athanasios

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 11:46 PM

Are you looking for graduate studies or undergraduate?

I mostly see anything of impact in graduate research. The available categories themselves are fairly broad and the research each lab is doing can be vastly different.

#3 Alex Libman

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 03:03 AM

Not to take anything away from academics and research universities, but I believe that the private sector will play the dominant role in bringing about the greatest longevity research.

"Formal" academia has an inherent pro-government bias (ex. "global warming"), and lengthening the lifespans of the Medicaid / Medicare liabilities is the very last thing that government bureaucrats will want to see! Longevity research is the ultimate argument argument against government-imposed equality and for "trickle-down economics", because reviving the first cryogenic (or whatever other breakthrough procedures may come about) can cost millions of times more than reviving the billionth one! That could never be sustainable in a socialized health-care system, because the system is biased for mediocrity. "Inequality" is absolutely essential for rapid economic and thus scientific growth.

So I recommend looking at a university as a stepping stone and nothing more - and the best of employers will even incentivize you to work reduced hours while you take night classes to finish your grad school / PhD!

Edited by Alex Libman, 31 March 2010 - 03:06 AM.


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#4 eternaltraveler

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 04:22 AM

practically none.

You can pick up good skills in graduate school, and there are a few isolated programs where you can do good if you look very hard, but most of all university sponsored longevity research is geared toward the government having to pay less money in social security and medicare (if people lived 1000 years that means they'd collect social security for 935 years!). Or at least thats how researchers have to sell it.

#5 David V

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 07:42 AM

Not to take anything away from academics and research universities, but I believe that the private sector will play the dominant role in bringing about the greatest longevity research.

"Formal" academia has an inherent pro-government bias (ex. "global warming"), and lengthening the lifespans of the Medicaid / Medicare liabilities is the very last thing that government bureaucrats will want to see! Longevity research is the ultimate argument argument against government-imposed equality and for "trickle-down economics", because reviving the first cryogenic (or whatever other breakthrough procedures may come about) can cost millions of times more than reviving the billionth one! That could never be sustainable in a socialized health-care system, because the system is biased for mediocrity. "Inequality" is absolutely essential for rapid economic and thus scientific growth.

So I recommend looking at a university as a stepping stone and nothing more - and the best of employers will even incentivize you to work reduced hours while you take night classes to finish your grad school / PhD!


Yeah, I don't think you know what you're talking about, maybe you should go troll a different forum tomorrow... please. This question has nothing to do with the US government or US politics. It has nothing to do with Economics. It has nothing to do with socialized health-care. It has nothing to do with global warming.

The only thing this topic relates to is trying to figure out where to focus my attention. I'm looking for students who might be interested in a research grant from a privately funded non-profit that wants to invest in 'formal academia'. You on the other hand, seem to be spamming your own shrill dogmatic liberal-economic gospel and detracting from this conversation. Please feel free to say whatever you want about your political beliefs, but please don't detract from my topic that has nothing to do with them.

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#6 Alex Libman

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 05:19 PM

Alright, so I've made a false assumption that you were a student looking for a good academic institution that focuses on longevity research, and wanted to put in my two cents about academia not being the only research venue that is out there. My bad.

Best of luck in your endeavor. Posted Image




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