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I've Never Had a Cavity


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#1 User1000

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 10:40 PM


Title says it all: I've never had a cavity...I've also never broken a bone, excluding my pinkie knuckle.

Side note: don't punk people in the back of the head. :blush:


Growing up I ate a fairly decent diet, although it did consist of a lot of crap carbohydrates. My parent never kept soda of any type in the house and I had no exposure to it until I was a teen. There was sugar type of snacks but not really that much.

In my mid-late teens my diet became horrible and I believe the only reason I am not a diabetic is because I worked so damn hard (physically) during that time. Nowadays, I eat much better, brush once a day (being honest) and never floss.

It may seem like I am some sort of super human with ultra-strong bones, but I tell ya' I'd trade it in to lose this gut of mine any day :laugh:

Also to note: The lack of broken bones is not from my sheltered life, I have done a lot of jobs and sports that would be considered risky enough for broken anything for a long time now.

Does anyone else have a cavity free and broken boneless life? Let me know!

:-D

#2 jughead

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 02:16 AM

How old are you? I'm 24 and haven't had a cavity. I broke one of my toes, but I don't see how it couldn't have broken given the impact it took.

#3 niner

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 02:35 AM

Growing up I ate a fairly decent diet, although it did consist of a lot of crap carbohydrates. My parent never kept soda of any type in the house and I had no exposure to it until I was a teen. There was sugar type of snacks but not really that much.

In my mid-late teens my diet became horrible and I believe the only reason I am not a diabetic is because I worked so damn hard (physically) during that time. Nowadays, I eat much better, brush once a day (being honest) and never floss.

It may seem like I am some sort of super human with ultra-strong bones, but I tell ya' I'd trade it in to lose this gut of mine any day :laugh:

Also to note: The lack of broken bones is not from my sheltered life, I have done a lot of jobs and sports that would be considered risky enough for broken anything for a long time now.

Does anyone else have a cavity free and broken boneless life? Let me know!

I've never broken a bone; kind of surprising given some of the stuff I've done and the fact that I'm osteopenic. Cavities? I wish I'd never had any. If you don't floss, you might find yourself losing those fine cavity-free teeth to periodontal disease anyway, so you might want to watch that. To lose the gut, lose the carbs. Cut out sugar and refined grains. If you just swore off of all wheat, that alone might do it. Eat more fat. That's right. Eat fat to get thin. (only works if you also cut down on the carbs)

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#4 Shoe

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 11:08 PM

I've never had a cavity, probably because I take pretty good care of my teeth and don't consume a lot of sweets and soda. I've never broken a bone either, but that's mostly due to luck, I'd say.

#5 JLL

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 01:22 PM

Man, I wish I'd never had a cavity. But regardless of diets (and I've tried several) I still seem to get some. I wrote a post about that a while ago:
Genes, Diet and Oral Health: Why Do Some People Get Cavities and Others Don't?
I've known people who eat crap food and drink sodas all the time and never brush their teeth and still no cavities.
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#6 Ron

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 06:23 PM

Also cavity-free so far in life. I'm not sure what to attribute that to since I didn't have good oral hygiene growing up...brushed once a day and did not floss. I also drank lots of soda and ate like crap until I was out of college. I don't credit genes because both my parents and my sister have plenty of cavities. I did drink lots of milk. Maybe that's a factor.

#7 yoyo

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 04:02 AM

No cavities, though i had two root canals because i got punched.

i think lots of tea is the main thing.

#8 User1000

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 05:33 AM

Thanks for the replies,

I was once told by a dental hygienist that my 'cusps' were shallow and that helped prevent the accumulation of gunk.

#9 cheezeweezel

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:34 PM

Never had a cavity, in spite of poor dental hygiene for the first 45 years (impeccable dental hygiene now). Never broken a bone; just lucky there. I'm closing in on 50.

I had a nasty hangnail once, though.

#10 The Immortalist

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 09:46 PM

Never broken a bone and I have no cavities in my adult teeth. I had tons of cavities when I was a kid though but luckily my dental hygiene and eating habits improved so I don't have any on my second set of teeth that grew in.

#11 nowayout

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 03:24 AM

I never had a cavity or broken bone. I am 46. Few people in my generation who grew up in South Africa get cavities, because of fluoridation of the drinking water. According to my uncle, a dentist, the difference with the previous generation, who grew up unfluoridated, is huge.

#12 Droplet

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 06:07 AM

Touch wood I never broken a bone but then I had an over protected upbringing. As an adult, I have been in situations that one or two inches could have meant it ending badly and had sprains but thankfully no breaks. :) I'm mildly hemiplaegic so one half of my body is weaker, less bendy and more prone to being hurt. As for cavities, I've unfortunately had them. I do confess to a lifelong sweet tooth but I have always brushed.

#13 fracking

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 05:01 AM

Marilyn Monroe was reported to have told photographers that they never photographaed her best feature her perfecr teeth. She was cavity free then.

#14 PGN

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 09:08 PM

My hubby is 53, has never seen a dentist in his iife! No cavities and perfect, straight teeth, never had acne, never gets bitten by mosquitoes. I, on the other hand, bad acne, bad teeth, lots of fillings, bridges, root canals. Mossies dive bomb me the second I step outside. His body chemistry is apparently repugnant to mosquitoes. Life is so unfair sometimes. But I look younger than him at least and I'm 3 years older

Edited by PGN, 01 June 2012 - 09:09 PM.


#15 machete234

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 07:43 PM

I got flourides as a kid and we never had soda at home and at least until I was 24 and started eating bad food I never had a cavity.
I also never broke a bone or Im not sure of it.

For like 4 years now I have a discoloration at the bottom of a tooth and Im watching it but it isnt really changing.

#16 seivtcho

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:19 PM

The most important for being free of cavities are regular (best daily daily - possible, but not recommended is once for two days) effective teeth brushing. By effective I mean brushing with a regular tooth brush, that to brush away all of the dental plaque on all surfaces of the teeth. This is the only thing, that everyone need in order to stop forming new cavities. Fail to do so, and whatever else You are using will lead to cavities formation or parodontitis and loosening of teeth. I have posted this over and over and it seems, that noone is reading it, and each time I post it the converstion proceeds for electric brushes, mouth rising solutions and other, that are not really necessary for the cavity free teeth. If You do not have some genetic predisposure, such as hereditory enamel imperfections, or impared shape of the teeth, all You need is regular brushing.

#17 leftside

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:24 PM

Nice to see other cavity free people. Same here. I'm 43. Plenty of broken bones though - from mountain biking :)




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