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The cause of Piracetam Mania

nootropics piracetam mania membrane fluidity neurotransmitters

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#1 Philosopher

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 01:27 PM


Since Piracetam increases membrane fluidity, all the brain's neurotransmitters flow quickly and better. When a person takes a high dose of piracetam, their membranes rapidly become more fluid, and all the chemicals flow better than before, resulting in a manic brain. Eventually, the body regulates its production of neurotransmitters to fit the new fluidity of the membranes on piracetam, and the mania goes away.





Came upon the theory while brushing my teeth just now
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#2 Philosopher

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 01:30 PM

Some users may reply that they are unaffected by piracetam because their membrane fluidity is already at its peak
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#3 kassem23

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 11:16 PM

That's a very simple-minded way of looking at it, and I'm sure that enhanced membrane-fluidity by itself doesn't cause mania. Piracetam's mechanism of action isn't fully elucidated yet, and I may very well be bipolar II or cyclothymic, so my neurobiology isn't normal in any way.

Edited by kassem23, 01 January 2012 - 11:17 PM.

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#4 absent minded

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 11:53 PM

maybe the researchers need more piracetam so they can finally understand piracetam's MOA in more detail or maybe they already take it and piracetam doesn't really work :laugh:
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#5 JChief

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:07 AM

I'm convinced that the substance resulted in several hypomanic reactions when I was taking it regularly. It wouldn't happen all the time. I have been taking uridine for about a month now to great effect. Initially I was taking piracetam and was feeling good so I gave it a rest. Well tonight I took a rather large dose (for me) of 3.5g and after about an hour or so I noticed a slight chance in perception. It's like I forgot what this stuff actually did when I was taking it regularly. Right now I feel the urge to sleep or stretch.. just like I need to relax. But my mind is working as if I were wide awake? It's odd. Piracetam has got to be one of the most interesting substances I've ever tried. And it doesn't behave exactly the same each time. Verbal communication is usually always constant as is music/visual changes in perception. I'd argue in those that are susceptible (bipolar types) piracetam can indeed induce mania. I still haven't figured it out. Even after months of random experimentation.
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#6 Animal

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 02:53 PM

It's simply depletion of acetylcholine that causes the hypomanic response; anticholinergics are well known as potential manic triggers. However I doubt Piracetam is potent enough to cause this effect unless sleep deprivation is also involved and very large amounts are taken. It's also likely that genetic predisposition and the polypharmacy of the users who experienced piracetam induced mania also contributed.

Isochroma for example had a full manic episode, with absurd grandiosity and paranoid delusions. Essentially he thought he was becoming God and that the world moved in slow motion because his mind was processing the information at a hyper-cognitive rate. But then again he was consuming a ridiculous amount of piracetam, and never left home without it. He even ate tablespoons of it straight from the tub while in the middle of a conversations in public. :wacko:
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#7 Nootropix

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 03:49 AM

I also have manic experience for year by Piracetam use without enough choline source ,like Animal said .
Large dose of lecithin daily ,manic symptom disappear .

#8 Nootropix

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 02:58 PM

Why in manic mode i have no any headache of not enough choline ?

#9 stablemind

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:45 PM

This may be a little off topic but Aniracetam is the only racetam which I could find a study for pertaining to Bipolar. I can't find the original source though.


Congress on Preventive Psychiatry
Athens, 1999 Feb. 24-28

Aniracetam treatment for lithium-produced cognitive deficits of bipolar patients

Aniracetam is considered to be a drug that can modulate the brain acetylcholine system. Administration of aniracetam (trade name: Referan, 1500 mg/day) has been reported to be effective in enhancing the cognitive function of patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. It is the first time that aniracetam is being used to improve cognitive dysfunction in patients with bipolar affective disorder on lithium treatment. Cognitive dysfunction has been reported to be one of the most serious side effects of lithium salts. Our research purpose was to clarify the relationship among bipolar affective disorder, lithium treatment and cognitive deterioration of these patients.

In the present study, we administered aniracetam to bipolar patients who were being treated prophylactically and evaluated possible changes in the RANDT Memory Test, in the Benton Visual Retention Test and in the Mini Mental State Examination. The subjects were 128 patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder based on DSM-IV criteria, receiving litium treatment for at least 3 years and under a regular follow up in the mood disorders clinic of our hospital. 67 patients (33 males and 34 females) were complaining of cognitive deterioration and difficulty in coping with routine daily activities. Prior to administration of aniracetam and at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 weeks after administration, evaluation of the patients' condition on the basis of the instruments quoted above was carried out. The recall time (reaction time) in both Randt and Benton tests and the overall scoring significantly improved after the 12th week, while 97% of the patients expressed subjective improvement. This effect could be due either to a positive amelioration of a sub-clinical depression or to a direct effect on the cognitive function of the patients.

The findings showed that aniracetam administration significantly improved the cognitive function of the patients. This change may have been due to improvement of the mental state of the patients (basically improvement of the patients' depressive state) but most likely explanation is that aniracetam has a direct effect on the mechanism by which lithium produces memory dysfuntion in bipolar patients and most probably on intracellular second-messenger generating systems and in particular on reception-coupled hydrolysis of phosphati-dylinositol-4,5 biphosphate (PIP2).

G.N.Christodoulou, P.N. Malitas, B. Alevizos
University of Athens Medical School,
Department of Psychiatry, Mood Disorders Clinic,
"Eginition" Hospital, Athens


Maybe this would be the better option of all the racetams.

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#10 truboy

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 02:44 PM

+1 for choline connection.
When taking piracetam buy it self or with low dose of lecithin(or choline citrate) - i am becoming a bit maniac.
As soon as i increase the dose of lecithin the mania goes a way.
If i increase the lecithin dose even more - depression kicks in.
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nootropics, piracetam, mania, membrane fluidity, neurotransmitters

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